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Full text of "S. F. News Letter (1890)"

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SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY. JANUARY 4, 1890. 



TABLE 



Leading Articles : Page 

Antt-Truci Legislation ... . 1 

The Water-Kales Decision 1 

A:i International Debate 2 

Fame 11 'a Pli?bt 2 

John P. Dudd 2 

McAllister's Lost Opportunity 2 






NTENTS. 



The Price nf Salvation. 2 Sunbeams. 

What is a Nuisance? 3 

-five Figures. 3 

GoldeuSouth Africa, 3 

Muuic pal Elephants 3 

End of the Colton Case 3 

Society .4 

What a Newspaper Woman Said . 5 

Pleasure's Wand 6 

A Slap at the Sunday Paper 7 

ir will not Work 7 

Sparks ... 8 

The Railroads - 9 

Sporting. 10 

Two Lips and Roses 11 



Page 

Our Central American Neighbors. 11 

"Arabian Music Room " 11 

Vanities 12 

Library Table 18 

Financial Review 14 

Town Crier 15 



16 

Scientific and Useful.. 17 

Real Property 18 

Bourse and Underwriter. 19 

Earlv 'Frisco Reminiscences 20 

The Captain's Cap 20 

The Rose Jar 21 

"Biz".. 22 

World, Flesh and Devil 23 



Society "Boys 

Homesteads and Matrimony. 

A Clerk's Luck 

Does not Like a Secret Ballot. 
Next. 



24 
24 
25 
2* 
27 
Comments on Foreign Affairs 28 



ANTI-TRUST LEGISLATION. 



THE Legislature of Missouri, at its last session, enacted a law 
prohibiting corporations entering into any pool, trust or com- 
bination intended to fix or limit the price of any article or com- 
modity, and imposing penalties for the violation of the prohibi- 
tion. Among other things, it declared void contracts made in 
violation of the Act, and provided for the forfeiture of the cor- 
porate rights and franchises, and the revocation of the charters of 
corporations entering into combinations forbidden by the Act. 
The Secretary of State was charged with the duty of enforcing 
the provisions of the Act, where corporations, in response to a re- 
quest by him, neglected or refused to file affidavits declaring their 
non-connection with pools, trusts or combinations. Several hun- 
dred corporations failed to comply with the request within the 
period allotted for that purpose, and he has given official notice 
of the revocation of the charters of the local companies, and in 
the case of the foreign ones doing business in the State, he has 
given notice of their failure to comply with the law, the penalty 
being forfeiture of charter after thirty days' notice. As a matter 
of course, the action of the State will be vigorously resisted by the 
parties in interest. Many of the corporations affected are enor- 
mously wealthy, and will not, if they can by any possibility 
avoid it, submit to the abrogation of their charters. Very much 
will depend upon the good faith and ability with which the State 
officers make up a test case. The law may in part transcend the 
powers of the State, and yet be perfectly constitutional in all 
other respects. It is understood that it will be attacked upon 
two grounds. First, that it violates the rights of private property 
guaranteed by the fundamental law; and, secondly, that it in- 
fringes on the domain of Congress in attempting to regulate inter- 
state commerce. The second ground is the more important one. 
The first is clearly untenable. No private property is affected if 
the law be complied with. Enactments requiring insurance and 
other companies to file statements, under penalty of the forfeiture 
of their charters, have again and again been declared to be consti- 
tutional. Charters are privileges conferred; not rights inherent. 
They are the creatures of legislation, and are subject to it. With 
regard, however, to corporations doing business of an interstate 
character, it would seem that congressional legislation is necessary 
to make such inhibitions effective. To illustrate, one of the for- 
eign corporations to be affected by the enforcement of the law, is 
the Western Union Telegraph Co., which is not a Missouri cor- 
poration, and whose business is largely between one State and an- 
other, and to that extent, as the United States Supreme Court has 
held, forms a part of the interstate commerce, which can be regu- 
lated by Congress alone. It may be that such of its business 
as is local may be suspended by the action of the State, and, if so, 
that in itself would be a sore blow. With regard to gas and water 
companies, and other corporations whose business is purely local, 
there would appear to be no doubt as to the potency of State 
legislation. That very point has just been decided in Illinois, in 
the case of the Chicago Gas Trust Company. The companies 
formed themselves into a trust for the purpose of raising the price 
of gas. The Supreme Court holds that for a corporation to sub- 
serve such a purpose, is not only opposed to public policy, but is 
in contravention of the spirit, if not the letter, of the Constitu- 
tion, and that it is the duty, as well as the clear right of the State, 
to ascertain if any of its chartered corporations are thus abusing 
their powers, and to take effective measures to prevent them. 



THE WATER RATES DECISION. 

THE Supreme Court's decision in regard to fixing water rates 
does not come as a surprise. It is, in fact, just what every 
thoughtful man knew it must be. The city fathers chose to 
an issue about which there could not reasonably be two opinions. 
Tht y claimed the right to arbitrarily fix the charges the water 
company should be entitled to collect, and refused to listen to any 
evidence tending to show that the rates they proposed to estab- 
lish would not permit a fair interest on capital to be earned. They 
contended that they were by law constituted the sole judges of 
what were reasonable charges, and that consequently there was 
no appeal from their fiat. They could fix the rates exorbitantly 
high or ruinously low, and neither the taxpayers on the one band 
nor the stockholders of the water company on the other had any 
right of challenge, question, investigation or appeal. Spring 
Valley very naturally took exception to the position assumed by 
the Supervisors, and, on its application, Judge Hoge decided, after 
lengthy arguments on both sides, that the action of the Super- 
visors was subject to judicial review, and that, if arbitrary and 
unreasonable, as it appeared to be in this case, it could beset aside; 
and he so ordered. From that decision the city took the appeal 
which has just been, by the almost unanimous concurrence of the 
judges, decided in favor of the water company. Of course, noth- 
ing else could have happened. There never was a doubt in any 
fairly well informed quarter as to what the result must be. The 
courts, both State and Federal, have uniformly held that to arbi- 
trarily fix such charges as will not permit a fair interest to be 
earned is to take private property without making due com- 
pensation therefor, which is forbidden by the fundamental law of 
the land. 

It should be observed that the Supervisors did not go into court 
and affirm that they had well and diligently performed their func- 
tions, and after due inquiry had, according to their best judg- 
ment, fixed fair and reasonable rates. Had any such answer 
been truly made, it is clear that it would have been deemed suf- 
ficient, and would have prevailed. The Court says: " It may be 
conceded that when the Board of Supervisors have fairly investi- 
gated and exercised their discretion, the Courts have no right to 
interfere on the sole ground that in their judgment the rates so 
fixed are not reasonable. That view is attested by numerous au- 
thorities. But it seems to us that this complaint presents a very 
different question. Its whole gist is that the Board of Supervisors 
have not exercised their judgment or discretion in the matter; 
that they have arbitrarily, without investigation, and without 
any exercise of judgment or discretion, fixed these rates without 
any reference to what they should be, without reference to the 
cost to the company, and so low as to render it impossible to 
furnish the water without loss, and so as to amour*- to a practi- 
cal confiscation of the plaintiff's property. If this b_ true, and 
the defendant's demurrer admits it, a party whose property is 
proposed to be so taken should not be without a remedy." 

The why and the wherefore, as well as the extent of the Court's 
decision, are thus made so plain that a wayfaring man, though a 
fool, need not err therein. Assuming that the Supervisors are 
honestly intent upon understanding their duty and doing it, they 
can now have no difficulty in determining what to do next. It is 
their business to forthwith meet, and, acting as a court of good 
conscience, bear, consider and determine what are fair and rea- 
sonable rates. The reaching of that determination is by no means 
the difficult task that some people may suppose. In point of 
fact it is one of the most simple and business like propositions 
imaginable. It is only necessary to determine what interest the 
water company may reasonably expect and be allowed to earn. 
All else that remains is a mere arithmetical calculation that can be 
worked out by an expert in a few hours. If seven per cent., say, 
be deemed a fair thing, it is the easiest matter imaginable to es- 
tablish rates that will yield that net income, over and above the 
company's fixed obligations for operating expenses and other 
charges which are known and ascertainable. It is idle humbug 
to pretend there is any difficulty about the matter at all. Those 
who so pretend know better. The only difficulties that at any 
time existed have only been such as designing persons have cre- 
ated for ulteiior purposes. Why should there be all this worry, 
toil and trouble over a question that two business men could 
equitably settle between themselves within a day? There is venom 
for certain newspapers and capital for a certain class of politicians 
in keeping it an open sore, but there is nothing in it for anybody 
else. The taxpayers are willing that Spring Valley's stockholders, 
of whom there are over eleven hundred, shall earn a reasonable 
interest on their investment. Why, then, longer bedevil the 
question with further appeals and costly litigation? It is due to 
justice and the honor of the«ity that this matter be settled with- 
out more ado. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 4, 1889. 



AN INTERNATIONAL DEBATE. 

BLAINE and Gladstone are debating the tariff question in the 
North American Review. Mr. Blaine is at a disadvantage in 
this discussion; he fights with his right hand tied behind him. 
His principal argument usually has been abuse of England. Brit- 
ish gold and the machinations of the Cobden Club have been 
excellent substitutes forreasoning — a species of exercise at which, 
owing to his magnanimous habit of taking the wrong side of 
every question upon which two sides could b3 discovered, the 
Plumed Knight has been rather shaky. But now, in debating 
with an Englishman of Mr. Gladstone's character, even Mr. Blaine 
is compelled to observe a certain decorum in his reference to Eng- 
land. If that country has interfered corruptly in American elec- 
tions * j break down American industry, it has been under Mr. 
Glad, one's leadership, for he represents preeminently the free- 
trade sentiment of the English nation. When it comes to cool, 
candid reasoning, Mr. Blaine is simply not in the fight with the 
Englishman. Mr. Gladstone subjects the theory that protec- 
tion raises wages to a crucial test. He shows that in the United 
States there are practically two nations, one protected and the 
other unprotected. These two work side by side. Are the wages, 
he asks, of the protected laborers any higher than those of the 
unprotected ? Everybody knows that they are not. It is the 
tariff-shielded coal miner, not the unprotected carpenter, who 
has to support his family in a hovel on sixty-five cents a day. 
Even Mr. Foster, the Harrisonian fat-frier of the last campaign, 
admitted that the monopolists got most of the benefit from the 
tariff; their workers know that they get it all. Mr. Gladstone 
did not put his case as strong as he might. He allowed it to 
seem as if the portion of the American people under the tariff 
umbrella and the portion out in the free-trade rain were substan- 
tially equal. The truth is that nineteen American workmen out 
of every twenty work under free-trade conditions, as far as the 
sale of their product is concerned, although they all have to pay 
tariff taxes on what they buy. The protectionist contention is 
that the wages of the twentieth, which are the lowest of the lot, 
fix the rate of wages for the nineteen. It is a small tail to wag 
so large a dog. Mr. Blaine's method of dealing with these con- 
siderations is characteristic. He assumes that Mr. Gladstone 
desires all Americans to give up manufacturing and go to raising 
grain and meat, and says that England believes in protection be- 
cause she pays British steamers for carrying her mails. Mr. Blaine 
ought not to waste his talents on diplomacy; they would qualify 
him admirably to practice law before Judge Rix. 

PARNELL'S PLIGHT. 

REGRET Parnell's plight aswemust.it is not possible to be 
honest, and at the same time deny that he is in the position 
of the engineer hoist with his own petard. For several years last 
past he and his followers have been on the lookout for social scan- 
dals with which to drag down political opponents. Parnell, La- 
bouchere and T. P. O'Connor have been a triumvirate who have 
traded in that sort of thing. They scored their first success 
against Sir Charles Dilke. A more able, useful and promising 
man than any of them, he was fiendishly pursued and relentless- 
ly driven into private life, and all because, that whilst a liberal 
of the liberals, he did not believe in Mr. Gladstone's particular 
scheme of Home Rule. The evidence against him, and which was 
used with venomous reiteration, was such as no man of the 
world would believe, but no matter, it serves its purpose. Last 
year Hughes-Hallett was driven from the House of Commons by . 
similar means and a seat gained by the Irish party. During the I 
past few weeks countless press^iespatches, all emanating from 
the same source and therefore to be taken with a great deal of al- 
lowance, have been published in this country in reference to what 
has come to be known as the Cavendish Square scandal. What 
the truth in regard- to that matter is, we do not pretend to know, 
but what is plain enough is that out of private scandal of some 
kind or other, a very dirty and disgusting attempt is being made 
to besmirch the Royal family, and to make political capital 
against the Unionist party. The insinuation against Prince Vic- 
tor has already been disproven and withdrawn, and the chances 
are that the other allegations are equally foundationless. AH 
these scandals reach this country through the same source and 
that source is the party of which Mr. Parnell is the ostensible 
leader, ^i et, strange to say, all this time it has been known that 
Parnell's own private life was as rotten as it well could be He 
was using a vain and weak man, and sending him upon all sorts 
of expeditions in order to get him oat of the way of the too 
great freedom of his voluptuous and beautiful wife. Captain 0'- 
Shea may be an idiot, or worse, but Parnell knowing him well 
recommended him as "a fit and proper person to represent Gal- 
way in Parliament" and lived in his house, and in criminal inti- 
macy with his wife meanwhile. There is, however, this to be 
said; if Parnell lived in some countries, we know his escapade 
would tend to make him more of a hero than an outlaw. 



JOHN P. DUNN. 

THIS individual, whose reputation as an obstructionist is well 
known, has refused to return into the State Treasury the 
$100,000 not needed in the support of the State Prison. Mr. Dunn 
says there is no law for it. What nonsense. When Mr. Devlin, 
the President of the State Board of Prison Directors, called upon 
Mr. Dunn in regard to the matter, he said it was an excellent 
thing, indorsed the action of the Governor, and said he would be 
glad to make the transfer, provided the Board of State Prison 
Directors asked him to do so by resolution. This they did, and 
when Mr. Devlin called upon him again and presented the resolu- 
tion referred to. he refused to make the transfer, on the ground 
that there was no law for it. But in the meantime the Democratic 
leaders have gotten to Mr. Dunn's bigoted ear and told him it 
would not do; that it would be too favorable to the Republican 
party and the Governor of the State, and hence his action. It 
matters not, the effect is the same. The people understand that 
corner-grocery politics is at the basis of Controller Dunn's change 
of base. Instead of being in the State Treasury the $100,000 will 
lie dormant in its fund, as Governor Waterman has requested the 
Prison Directors not to audit a single claim calling for pay out of 
that fund. It is not needed in the support of the Prison, and Mr. 
Dunn is as well aware of it as any one. This is the same Dunn 
who refused to receive part payment of taxes from the Railroad 
Company several years since, put the State to an immense ex- 
pense, brought it to the verge of bankruptcy, and caused all classes 
dealing with the State, particularly the laboring classes, to lose a 
large percentage of their hard earnings in discounting their claims. 
This he did on account of his hate to the Railroad Company and 
for political reasons ; the same feelings actuating him in the pres- 
ent case. Thank God, the next election will dispose of John P. 
Dunn, the obstructionist. 

MCALLISTER'S LOST OPPORTUNITY. 



WARD MCALLISTER, the autocrat of the New York Four 
Hundred, read to a party of friends the other day a letter 
offering him a handsome commission if he would enable the writer 
to get into society. The gentleman said that he had all the neces- 
sary qualifications, and promised to conduct the transaction on a 
cash basis. Apparently Mr. McAllister considered the proposition 
inadmissible, but it is hard to see why. He would scarcely deny 
the proposition that whatever is English is correct, and he must 
know that in England payments for social introductions are too 
common to excite remark. There are dowagers of an Eiffel alti- 
tude of rank, with pedigrees more ancient even than those of the 
Astors and Vanderbilts, who make a regular profession of taking 
young ladies to board in the guise of guests, and procuring them 
presentations at Court and opportunities to meet eligible parties of 
the Cleveland street and other aristocratic sets. Of course, the 
terms are not paraded on the house-tops, but the facts are well 
understood by those who have any business to know. So, why 
should not Mr. McAllister capitalize his influence in the way sug- 
gested? In England the persons who do such things are guilty 
of a certain deception, since society there is based on birth and 
breeding, and those who have its confidence are under an implied 
contract not to make merchandise of its favors. But there are 
no such restrictions in New York. Society there is a matter of 
money. Its undisputed queen, Mrs. Astor, can scarcely put on a 
fur sacque without an apology to the humble animal from which 
she derives her crown. So, as long as all the members of the 
Four Hundred undeniably buy their way in, why should they 
not do it through Mr. McAllister? Nobody could spend the 
money to better advantage. 

THE PRICE OF SALVATION. 



THE Examiner has been asking numbers of more or less prom- 
inent people what improvement, in their opinion, would most 
benefit San Francisco during the present year. Several of the 
ministers interviewed express a preference for a revival of religion, 
but the Rev. Mr. Gray, of the Church of the Advent, is more 
practical. " What we most need in our work just now," he ex- 
plains, ■• is money." It is indeed. It is in that direction that the 
world sees its only present hope of religious unity. If the Pres- 
byterians, the Baptists, the Methodists, the Catholics, and all the 
other followers of the' Master, should send delegates to a general 
conference, charged with healing all the schisms in the church 
universal, they would wrangle over every subject but one. But 
they would all agree upon the text: " The laborer is worthy of 
his hire," and the higher the better. Mr. Talmage, whose Brook- 
lyn Tabernacle recently burned down, has appealed to all the 
world to help him rebuild it. He has not yet appealed to his 
own congregation, composed of several thousand of the richest" 
people in the country, nor has he depleted his own pocket. He 
earns about $40,000 a year by the sweat of his jaw, and has some 
hundreds of thousands of dollars comfortably salted down in 
mortgages and other choice securities. but|he obeys the Scriptural 
injunction: "Take no heed to the things of this world," and 
therefore forgets that he has anything when he is passing around 
the hat. Mr. Gray is right. A revival of religion would be well 
enough in its way, but there is a saving grace about solid coin 
that touches tne inmost fibers of the clerical heart. 



: ! — 



Jan. 4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SUGGESTIVE FIGURES. 



THE Untied States, daring the last fiscal year, received from its 
foreign petal urrioe, three times as much as it expended. 
It made an en irmoiu profit on it-- foreign letter-carrying business. 
It is a curious and altogether exceptional experience. Other 
countries run their foreign postal business at more or less of a 
oss. Their desire to cultivate commerce is so great that they are 
content to lose something on every little messenger (such as let- 
ters are) sent out to win it. They invariably pay subsidies in 
ige received from the letters carried. That they 
find their advantage in the increased trade that results cannot be 
doubted by any man acquainted with the trend of the world's 
commerce. It is anomalous that at a time when local over-pro- 
duction in miny articles is rendering foreign markets so essential 
to the continued growth of this country it should neglect such 
elective means for the extension of our trade boundaries. M ak- 
in? a profit on our foreign addressed letters is something new 
under the sun. It is not free trade, nor is it protection. It is a 
direct tax upon trade to the advantage of our competitors. It is 
so indefensible and absurd as to almost stagger one in the effort 
to believe it true. Yet the fact is not in doubt. The annual re- 
port of First Assistant Postmaster-General Clarkson shows that 
for the year ending July 1, 1889, the number of articles sent in 
the mails exchanged with foreign countries amounted to 93,015,- 
506, and the number of articles received to SI, 882, 210. For its 
share of the expense of carrying these articles our government 
p* id ?687,542. It received in the shape of postage upon them, 
$2,190,995, being a net profit of $1,503,453, or nearly 250 per cent. 
The most ardent free-trader will assuredly not argue for the con- 
tinuance of a state of things that, so far from leaving trade free, 
taxes it for no apparent reason further or other than that it ex- 
ists. It may be said that if the foreigner chooses to carry our 
letters at less than cost price, and make us a present of the differ- 
ence, we can stand it if he can. But that is just where the shal- 
lowness and stupidity of our system comes in. The foreigner is 
very willing to let us enjoy a sprat of postage if we will but re- 
frain from competing with him for a mackerel of trade. That is 
it exactly. Steam lines are the commerce-winners of the age. 
Our government profits to the extent of a million and a half a 
year by this business. Let it begin by expending w r hat it receives, 
and observe the effect. If the result is not a great accession of 
new customers, there must be something very exceptionally 
wrong in our trade methods. Our present policy is a disgrace to 
the commercial intelligence of the nation. 

MUNICIPAL ELEPHANTS. 



SECRETARY SPOTTS has been furnishing the City Hall Com- 
missioners with some figures which presumably are intended 
to prove something, They relate to the comparative cost of our 
New City Hall and the Philadelphia Public Buildings. Mr. Spotts 
says that the two structures were begun in the same year; that up 
to date Philadelphia has paid $13,377,245.48 forits elephant, while 
we have paid only $3,783,673.97 for ours, and that only a fourth 
of the Philadelphia monstrosity is habitable, while the whole is 
not expected to be finished for six years. Mr. Spotts does not say 
what his object is in making this comparison, but it probably is 
to show that we are playing in pretty fair luck, compared to some 
other people. A pertinent answer might be that the Philadel- 
phians have something to show for their money, and we have not. 
The gigantic swindle that has enriched successive generations of 
official Brotherly Lovers produces an imposing architectural ef- 
fect. The San Francisco City Hall produces nothing but sore 
eyes and malaria. But that is aside from the main question. If 
every dollar of the thirteen millions spent in Philadelphia had 
been thrown away, the fact would not make the waste of money 
on the San Francisco freak any more agreeable. Four million 
dollars is a good deal to be stolen from one city, whether another 
four times as large has had its pockets picked of four times as 
much or not. Doubtless, if the San Francisco Democratic ring 
had the opportunities of the Philadelphia Republican ring it could 
get away with just as much. Clive was astonished at his own 
moderation, because he helped himself to only $1,200,000 out of 
the treasury of Moorshedabad when he might have taken two or 
three millions. Buckley, of San Francisco, and McManes of Phila- 
delphia are not built that way. Their rule is to go for every thing 
in sight. If one gets more than the other the difference is the 
measure of their opportunities, not of their intentions. The New 
York State Capitol at Albany, and the Public Buildings at Phila- 
delphia are the two monumental examples of Eastern jobbery. 
Mr. Spotts will hardly comfort us by telling us that our City Hall 
as yet has cost less than either of them. The fact remains that 
it has cost a sum that would build four thousand workmen's cot- 
tages, or fifteen buildings like the new California Hotel, or that 
would rebuild all our eighty schoolhouses in modern style of 
brick and stone, and leave enough over to supply the Fire De- 
partment with all the new apparatus it needs, and that for all 
that money we have a City Hall that any loyal San Franciscan 
with an eastern visitor in tow, would go ten blocks out of his 
way to avoid. 



GOLDEN SOUTH AFRICA. 

SOl'TII AF1UCA is the latest and most promising El Dorado 
of the persevering and speculative gold hunter. The diamond 
mines of Kimberley, with their brilliant output of $22,000,000 a 
year, are being overshadowed by the greater promise of the gold 
fields of the Boer Republic. There can now be no question but 
that the latest contributor to the world's gold product has come 
to stay and cut a distinguished figure in the monetary affairs of 
mankind. There are those, indeed, who believe that the best 
days of California and Australia are about to be rivaled, if not 
surpassed. For ourselves, we are bound to say that we do not 
quite believe all we hear and read in this connection, but when a 
very liberal per centage is taken off, by way of discount, the un- 
deniable facf remains that a vast region, in which gold hearing 
reefs abourd, has been opened up to the skill and enterprise of 
the hardy and adventurous miner. There can be no doubt Sib out 
the existence of the gold, for it is being shown up, and in large 
quantities. When we read official reports of this, that and the 
other mine yielding so many thousand ounces as the result of the 
last month's clean-up, we know that we are dealing with reliable 
data, and realize that such outputs indicate a great and promis- 
ing gold field of illimitable possibilities. Each succeeding weekly 
mail steamer takes to Europe a larger export of the precious 
metal than its immediate predecessor. It is a sign that is not to 
be mistaken. That gold had to be dug out of somewhere, or it 
could not be exported. There is very little alluvial mining. 
When the few and comparatively small mills that have as yet 
reached the ground, can thus early make so good a showing, 
it does not require a very great deal of experience in gold mining 
to enable the fact to be safely determined that a big business 
awaits the proper application of skill and capital. The gold 
regions, so far as at present explored, do not appear to be " poor 
men's diggings." Although the quartz and burnt conglomerate 
in which the gold is found, crop out on the surface, nothing can 
be done without a mill, and that of course costs money. There 
is little employment for working miners, by reason of the fact 
that Kaffir labor is reasonably abundant and cheap. The Boer 
law denies to the natives the right to mine on their own account, 
and makes it a criminal offense for them to possess or sell un- 
coined gold. Verily, the ways of the Ethiopian are hard, even in 
his own land. He is practically enslaved on the soil of which he 
is the lord and master, and by a Dutchman and a Republican. 

WHAT IS A NUISANCE? 



NO man is permitted by law to maintain a nuisance to the an- 
noyance or injury of his neighbor. There is no question or 
doubt at all about the principle intended to be compassed by the 
law. The individual pursuit of happiness is limited only by the 
right of one man to infringe upon the rights of another. It is not 
always clear as to when he does or does not do that. The full 
Supreme Bench of New Hampshire has just given a new, far- 
reaching and strange interpretation of what constitutes "a nui- 
sance." The State Legislature in 1887 passed a law declaring any 
building used for the sale of intoxicating liquor a nuisance, and 
enabled twenty citizens of any town to call on the County Attor- 
ney to abate the same, jurisdiction in equity being given to the 
Supreme Court, just as it is in California. The law was at once 
put in force by a citizen's league, notably at Manchester and at 
Keene, which latter place was practically without hotel accom- 
modation for several weeks. Of course the question of the con- 
stitutionality of the law was promptly raised, and it is that which 
has now been passed upon by the highest appellate court, which, 
with singular unanimity, and almost with enthusiasm, holds that 
the lawlis so hide-bound , w r ater-tight and copper-bottomed as to ren- 
der it utterly futile to attempt to drive the proverbial coach and six 
through it. It is a new way of accomplishing prohibition, but a 
singularly effective one so long as the interpretation of the Su- 
preme Court can be depended upon. If a saloon is in law a nui- 
sance, anybody can cause its suppression. But where such an 
interpretation is possible there must be a very different public 
conscience from that which prevails in California. 

END OF THE COLTON CASE. 



MRS. COLTON'S attempt to have again dragged into court a trial 
of her suit against the Railroad Company has been very for- 
tunately frustrated by the Supreme Court, in bank, handing down 
a decision which upheld Judge Jackson Temple's decision deny- 
ing her a new trial. This puts an end to a lawsuit which takes, 
rank among the celebrated cases of California, and Judge Temple 
has to be congratulated upon the fact that the Supreme Court has 
upheld him in most of his findings. It is so long since the case 
was tried in Santa Rosa that few people were aware that it was 
yet in court, and the decision last Thursday, to the exception of 
a few who kept themselves informed about it, came as a surprise. 
In its trial were employed the most brilliant lawyers of the State, 
and to one, at least, it was most disastrous. Among Mrs. Colton's 
attorneys was G. Frank Smith, who began the case at the time of 
a strong anti-railroad agitation, and depending, no doubt, on this 
feelingThe risked his entire fortune in it, only to see it swept away 
in the maelstrom of legal mystery. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan 4, 1889. 



IT is, perhaps, fortunate that the condition of the skies here- 
abouts on New Year's Day has ceased to be of much moment 
to our beaux and belles, else would the vagaries of the weather 
god have kept them on fcke anxious seat during the preceding 
' week. It has been impossib! to count with any degree of cer- 
tainty six hours ahead as to what kind of Atmospheric tempera- 
ture would be given us. We have had snow-like frosts, sum- 
! mer-like sunshine— at least to us of San Francisco— in alternation 
; during the day, while between times the rain drops came down 
| as merrily as though the rainy season were only just commenc- 
ing, and showers yet a novelty, instead of such an old story. 
Time was that New Years' Day in San Francisco was looked 
! forward to the whole twelve month round as one of the jolliest 
i and most enjoyable in the year, and therefore clear skies over- 
I head and dry ground underfoot were always prayed for to render 
I the holiday a success. But since New York took the lead in con- 
demning the custom of New Year's calls as being no longer good 
form, we have gradually dropped it also, until keeping open 
house is now more honored in the breach than in the observance, 
and all who can go out of town to spend the first days of the new 
year, while those who can't, make believe that they do, for to be 
seen within the city limits on New Year's Day is unfashionable 
to a degree. If New York has its Tuxedo Parle, where the inner 
circle of its Four Hundred go to while away the New Y T ear time, 
San Francisco has its Monterey. It is rapidly becoming the cor- 
rect thing to pass the holidays under Del Monte's hospitable roof- 
tree, and the New Year festivities there this year were partici- 
pated in by a large number of our leaders of fashion. 

For th« week was spent with much gaiety at the Del 
Monte. Every afternoon there was a concert and in the evenings 
there was an impromptu dance to the delightful music furnished 
by Brandt and his admirable orchestra. Brandt's selections are 
always good, and the only fault that can be found with him is 
that he is sometimes a trifle too fast; if this were rectified there 
is no doubt that he would soon furnish the music at all fashion- 
able entertainments. The New Year's Eve Ball was a delightful 
affair, as there were not too many on the floor to incommode the 
dancers. At 11 o'clock a hot supper was served, which was quite 
in keeping with the Del Monte style. At midnight the door 
leading into the dining-room was thrown open, when a bugler 
appeared and blew a blast heralding the New Year's birth. James 
Brett Stokes, who was at one of the tables, immediately sprang 
up with a bumper of champagne wine in his hand, drank to its 
health, and gaily carolled forth a song whose refrain consists of 
"drink it down." It was drunk down quite merrily and the 
chorus was repeated till the rafters rang with the words. 

Another grand success was the Charity Ball at the Hotel Ven- 
dome on New Year's Eve, which was one of the most brilliant 
gatherings of the many which have taken place since the opening 
of the hotel. 

A farewell dinner was given last Monday evening to Captain W. 
S. Schenck, TJ. S. M. C.,on his departure for Philadelphia, by a 
few of his intimate friends. Among those who were present 
were Colonel Stuart M. Taylor, C. L. Weller, Chauncey M. 
St. John, John Q. Adams, Harry E. Wise and Clement Bennett. 

A cotillion will be given next Tuesday evening by Harry E. 
Wise at the residence of his parents Mr. and Mrs. John S. Wise. 
There will be twenty-five couples. 

In the afternoon that wonderful old veteran, Col. J. D. Steven- 
son, celebrated his 90th birthday by holding a reception at Pioneer 
Hall, where a large number of his friends called to congratulate 
him and wish him " Many happy returns." 

Fortunately the weather on New Year's Day was on its good 
behavior, warm, bright and dry. So the inauguration of the new 
Tennis Court at Alameda was a success, and the games played 
• witnessed by a goodly-sized collection of guests. But, alas! hope 
told a flattering tale to those who counted upon a continuance of 
fine weather, for Thursday brought us more rain and hastened the 
return to town of many of our absentees who had intended mak- 
ing a longer stay in the country had the weather been more pro- 
pitious. Last night took place the regular german of the Oak- 
land Cotillion Club in our sister city across the bay, and the dance 
given by Miss Perry at her father's, General Perry's quarters at 
the Presidio. 

The club dance at Mrs. Houghton's rooms at the Palace Hotel 
on Friday evening of last week was a very pleasant gathering. 
The rooms looked pretty in their Christmas decorations of green. 
lighted up with red berries, were comfortably filled with guests, 
and an excellent supper was not one of the least attractions 
offered by the hostess for their gratification. Another was a brief 
german, led by Frank Carolan and Miss Houghton, who intro- 
duced several pretty figures. 

The society wedding of next week will be that of Miss Sophie 
Gibbs to Mr. Frederick Johnson, which will be solemnized at 
Grace Church on Tuesday evening, a reception to follow the cere- 
mony at the home of the bride's parents on Post street. 



Apropos of weddings, it is whispered that there will be another 
wedding in the Thornton family ere long, the bride-elect being the 
daughter of Mrs. Bessie Thornton, a cousin of Mrs. Stuart Taylor, 
and sister of May Thornton, who was married a few weeks ago 
to Mr. Taylor of Palermo. 

Other events on the cards for next week are the club party at 
Mrs. Pope's on Thursday night; the Bachelors' german at B'nai 
B'rith Hall on Friday night, with Mr. Vernon Gray as leader; a 
lunch; two dinners; a high tea, and Mme. Billoni's concert at 
Irving Hall, which promises to be a society affair. 

It has been rather a hardship for Mrs. Percy Selby to be obliged 
to give up her comfortable quarters in town, where she was so 
nicely settled, as she supposed, for the winter. However, the 
limine has been purchased by Mr. Delmas, and his family will 
take possession of it as soon as it is vacated, which will proba- 
bly be within a couple of weeks. It has been Mrs. Delraas's in- 
tention to give a bail ibis winter to celebrate the entrance of her 
daughter, Miss Delphine, into society, and she at one tiiiie B&BStid 
the Palace Hotel as the place where it would come off. But dom , 
she will in all likelihood give it as a sort of housewarming, after 
the family get settled in their new home, the former residence of 
Mr. William T. Coleman, on Taylor street. 

California is well represented at the East this winter, and Wash- 
ington claims a large percentage of the Pilgrims from the Pacific 
Coast as its own. Among the latest acquisitions there are Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Newlands, who have taken a house, and will re- 
main in Washington the rest of the season, and I heard yesterday 
that it was not improbable that Mrs. Newland's sister, Miss Mc- 
Allister, would be their guest a portion of the time. 

A late addition to our society comes in the persons of Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry P. Bowie, who have reconsidered their intention of 
spending the winter at their pretty San Mateo cottage and have 
taken rooms for the rest of the season at the Lick House. Mr.?. 
Bowie's pretty daughter, Miss Howard, who is one of the admired 
belles of our society, is -with her mother, and has been gladly 
welcomed to town by her young friends. 

Mrs. Easton, accompanied by her grand children, the youthful 
members of Col. Fred Crocker's family, left for Coronado Beach 
on Wednesday last where they will remain a couple of months at 
least, possibly longer. 

Madame Louisa J. Higgs and her father, Professor C. Geoffrie, 
gave a snap-dragon party on New Year's eve, and several friends 
were invited to meet the great violiniste, Madame Camille Urso, 
and her husband, Monsieur I. Luere. A charming conversazione 
soiree was passed, all enjoying the old English pastime of snap- 
dragon. The guests invited to meet Madame tlrso were: Judge 
and Mrs. Selden Wright, Miss Roberta Wright, Mrs. J. Tallant, 
Miss Hart, Mr. E. Lourdry, Mr. W. Harrington, Miss D. Griswold, 
Mr. W. W. Griswold, Miss B. Schafer, Mrs. Dr. Bard, Miss May Blos- 
som Davis, Miss Josie Davis, Mr. Mitchell Grant, Mr. and Mrs. 
Austin, Mr. H. Austin, Miss Elene Austin, Mr. F. Austin, Mr. 
John Wildman, Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Will, Mr. and Mrs. H. Engle- 
brecht, Mr. W. Higgs, Mr. and Mrs. Ashlow and Mr. C. Higgs. 
A large Xmas pudding was served to the guests at 10:30, and the 
health of all absent friends was toasted. 

A very delightful house party was given by Mr. H. S. Dexter, 
at his lovely home, " LaCantera," at Calistoga. during Xmas week. 
Among his guests were: Lieut, and Mrs. Bailey, Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Everett Wise, Miss Newlands, Miss Lena Maynard, Miss Mellis, 
Mr. Elliott McAllister and Mr. H. N. Chauncey. 

Mrs. O'Connell, wife of Captain J. J. O'Connell, and daughter, 
arrived last Monday from the East. They are ai Angel Island 
where they will be delighted to see their friends on Thursdays- 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Highton, Mrs. E. R. Highton, Miss Edith 
Highton and Miss Ethel Cook spent the Christmas holidays at the 
Hotel del Monte. 

Parisian lady, thorough French and Music Teacher, wishes en- 
gagement as resident or visiting governess, or would chaperon young 
lady; unexceptional city references. Address " Lady," News Lettkk. 

The sensible man eats his dinner at the Maison Riclie, at the 
corner of Geary street and Grant avenue. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W. B. CHAPMAN, 



SOLE AGENT FOR 
PACIFIO OOAST, 

123 California St. S.F. 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOB SALE BY ALL FIB8T-CLA83 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



5 



WHAT A NEWSPAPER WOMAN SAID. 

[Bi Di Vnoto*.] 

»» uniMi do 70a prefer," said I to e person of mach expert- 
W ■ooetn »ell around" Journalism, » to bo called a news- 
paper woman or a literary lndy ' ■ Well, to till yon the truth," 
sbe with a bitter laugh, •« I think I should prefer t<> have 

my prtiftM-tiMiinl capacity Ignored. I ftm heartily su k of the 

whole) rhe pitieble, and also the most despicable weak- 

md hypocrisies of our poor human nature are exposed to 

«, lnwyVr* and journalist*. Take for instance, the familiar 
subject of newspaper personalities; the fashion is to shrug the 
■boulders and roll up the eyes in holy horror at the very idea of 
having one's name in the paper. Ami yet the truth is, that in 
private, people seek newspaper notoriety, while inveighing 
■ it in public. It is a fact si-eeptihle of proof in every news- 
paper office that women themselves have written full accounts of 
DtertainmentS and their own toilets, and sent them to the 
social editor, with the request that he publish what they have 
written without the alteration of aline. Many a gentlemanly re- 
porter presents his card at the front door of some aristocratic 
mansion, and asks for points concerning the trousseau to be used 
in the description of the wedding when it should come off. His 
request is refused, with more or less courtesy, because ' the idea 
of publicity is repugnant to the lady.' He retires and reports his 
failure to his chief, who at once puts into his hand an order from 
the identical lady, to her dressmaker, authorizing that function- 
ary to give fall and exhaustive particulars about all her garments. 
Then the 'victim ' of such distressing newspaper publicity, secret- 
ly sends marked copies of the paper containing the description to 
everybody she knows, or wishes to impress with an idea of her 
social importance, and when the article is commented upon, she 
exclaims, ■ How did that get in, I should like to know; when the 
man came up here I just wouldn't see him.' Much has been said 
about the underhand methods of procuring society news; the way 
is underhand, but seldom does the dishonor rest with the reporter. 
Back stairs and dressing-rooms are not the chief source of infor- 
mation, after all. 

"To be sure, there are people living such quiet, humdrum lives 
that they are perfectly safe from the intrusion of the reporter and 
his note book. Space is too important to be spared even for the 
mention of their names. These are the people who make the 
most fuss about the custom of reporting social affairs. They in- 
wardly resent being let alone because it would seem to imply that 
they are without social prominence. To my mind there is a vast 
amount of hypocrisy in resenting the publication of one's name 
among a list of guests. Unless one goes in company of which he 
or she would be ashamed, it is an insult to a hostess and to her 
friends, to find fault because names of her guests are published in 
a social column. 

" If it be known that you write for the press," continued my 
journalistic friend, "you will receive a vast amount of patronage. 
You will get free tickets to charitable entertainments, and be ex- 
pected "to give a column ' ad ' in exchange. • There, that's some- 
thing to put in your paper,' is a stock phrase with those who seek 
to lay you under a sense of obligation by working off some old 
chestnuts upon you. Should you allow yourself to be beguiled 
into using any such contribution, you are undone. Through the 
vanity of your < friend ' it is speedily circulated that you are in- 
debted to your acquaintances not for a trifling incident, but for 
much of the inspiration and execution of your literary work. 

"Then people have such a mean way of disavowing their re- 
sponsibility for imparted information. Take interviews, for 
instance," said my friend. " Now, I have never, in all my expe- 
rience, used the name and views of any one without having had 
the full consent of the person, given at the time with a full 
knowledge of bow the interview was to be used. Afterwards, 
when some forty-'leventh cousin remonstrates, the 'victim' of 
newspaper duplicity replied: <I had no idea my name was to be 
used, or I'would not have given my views.' Such hypocrisy! 
Take another instance. Someone tells you a good story or shows 
you an object of interest. You say, ( I must write that up,' and 
not a word is said to prohibit it. Or you ask permission to use it, 
and the request is granted with a readiness that shows how flat- 
tered the person is at the idea that he, even in this remote way, 
will be connected with the press. Perhaps, after your article is all 
written and laid away awaiting its turn for publication, you hear 
the same incident, told in a little different style, in a mixed com- 
pany. From the originator of the story, you have already had 
permission to use it; it does not occur to you to seek a second 
permission. Then your article appears, and what a chatter of 
protest and accusation goes up from all the tiny intellectual daws ! 
Before you know it, the incident has assumed grave proportions. 
You are accused of having violated the laws of hospitality; you 
are misrepresented and maliciously maligned in every way. What 
you may have written in a spirit of kindness — declined, perhaps, 
by one paper because it was too much of a puff — has been so dis- 
torted in the interpretation of its motive that you are at last 
merely the embodiment of an evil spirit going about with note- 
book and pencil, seeking whom you may impale on the point of 
a caustic pen. 'It is not safe to speak before her; there is no 



freedom of speech where she i> ; she only appears for the sake of 
what she may ohance to pick up,' is the thorn--. Oh 1 the ever- 
lasting conceit of people without any education, powerless to 
think for themselves, who have never perpetrated a joke, who 

are mentally what those are physically • whose fat blood sleeps as 
it slips along their veins.' What egotism, what senaelesa conceit, 
for these mental jelly fishes, whose brain spreads out in a shape- 
less mass without the backbone of a single original idea to hold 
it in position, to imagine for an instant that they, except by con- 
tract, can furnish a single idea to a trained professional writer! 
"Another thing— those who write have to father more than 
they ever dreamed of. The wiseacres can always detect ■ who 
wrote the article.' They belong to the class who believe that 
every writer on a paper knows just who wrote every paragraph 
in its columns. They do not believe that a modern Junius pre- 
serves his incognito. Animated by a desire to say < I told you 
so,' such people feel it their duty to go about warning others to 
beware of this or that person, because he or she 'writes for the 
papers,' and sacrifices friend and foe just to score a point. 
When asked to produce proof for such a charge, they reply, ■ Oh, 
I can't say when or how; I have always thought it was so.' 
What right has any one to proclaim surmises or suspicions as 
certainties? And yet, when a writer so maligned, traces such a 
rumor to its source, and demands a retraction, and a cessation of 
such a scandal, everybody seems to think that it is much ado 
about nothing. Why should a writer be forced to stand such a 
malicious style of criticism? Apply this rule to other vocations. 
Where would it lead? Most likely into a suit for libel. If the 
treasurer of a charitable society were to be the subject of covert 
insinuation that she had misused funds, if a leading officer should 
hear a rumor that he was working his society in his own inter- 
ests, would not both be justified in demanding an investigation, 
and in forcing a retraction? Certainly, unless they were entirely 
lacking in self-respect. But a writer, particularly a woman, must 
bear it all in silence; be adjudged quarrelsome if she seek justice 
or strives to clear her reputation for such aspersions of dishonor- 
able conduct. 'It is foolish to stir things up; it is better not to 
take any notice, to let it die out quietly.' Bah! out upon such 
cowardly councils! I believe in no pusillanimous peace policy, 
no shrinking to face the issue." " You wax indignant," said I, as 
my journalist friend paused for breath. "I have good cause to 
be angry," was her reply, " for the meanest and most contemptible 
of the attacks tipon me have been made by women who, like 
myself, were or have been self-supporting, who know what it is 
to work for a living." " It is too bad," said I, sympathetically, 
" but what are you going to do about it? " 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 4, 1889. 




We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 



OTTO HEGNER, the infant prodigy, who can play and com- 
pose at the same time on the piano, was to have been the at- 
traction at the Baldwin this week and next, but owing to his un- 
successful Western tour, Manager Abbey has recalled him. The 
Duff troupe stayed a week longer than was intended, and have 
been singing The Queen's Mate to delighted audiences. The com- 
pany has met with much encouragement from our theatre-goers, 
and have made hosts of friends. Miss Kate Gilbert has been an 
especial favorite here, and has been especially admired for her 
singing and dancing. 

Next week the Baldwin will be closed, and on Monday, Janu- 
ary 13th, the Emma Juch Grand Opera Company will open in 
Faust. During the week II Trovatore, Mignon, Maritana, Carmen, 
The Bohemian Girl and Die Freichutz will be sung. In the com- 
pany, aside from Mme. Juch, are Laura Bellini, Marie Ruebert, 
Lizzie Macnichol, Susie Leonhardt, Fanny Gonzales, Charles 
Hedmont, Frank Baxter, Franz Vetra, Alonzo Stoddart, William 
Bott and I. S. Guise. The orchestra is under the direction of 
Herr. Add Nuendorf. 

Stockwell's performance of Daniel Groodge, in Mankind, has 
proved a treat to those who have seen it. Daniel Groodge will 
always be a good character to be copied. Mr. Stoekwell does not 
exaggerate his work in the least, and although he lays no claim 
to dramatic acting, he has shown that he is something more than 
a comedian. Mankind might be cut down an act and yet have a 
good ending; the last act could be omitted without an injury be- 
ing done the piece. Mankind will remain on the Alcazar boards 
for another week. 

# # # 

Aida has proved such a strong drawing card at the Tivoli, that 
it will be kept on another week, and probably longer. While 
making mention of the various performers last week, we failed to 
notice Henry Norman, whose interpretation of Rarnpbis, the 
High Priest of Isis, has won for him considerable praise. Al- 
though the music is heavy, he is capable to do it justice, and this, 
coupled with the fact that he thoroughly grasps the idea of the 
difficult part, makes his performance a noteworthy one. 

# # * 

The next opera to be produced at the Tivoli will be a new one, 
entitled Furiosa, or the Daughter of Hades. The music is by Theo- 
dore Vogt, and the libretto by Fritz La Fontaine. Vogt is a thor- 
ough musician, and those who have seen the rehearsals of Furiosa, 
say that it is a particularly bright composition. La Fontaine has 
already written several stage productions; some of them have 
been successful, and some have not. He wrote the greater por- 
tion of the libretto of W. W. Furst's grand opera Theodora. The 
new opera is described in three acts, the first being laid in Hades, 
the second on Earth, and the last in Hades also. So far as we can 
discover the story runs as follows: The devil is gifted every year 
with a boy, much to his sorrow, as he wishes his offspring to be 
a girl. Finally his wish is gratified, and the girl proves more 
than a match for her Satanic papa by coming to earth, and while 
there making the most of her opportunities. Her father's efforts 
to get her back to where she belongs, and the girl's exploits to 
evade him, form the chief factors of the opera, and judging from 
this, it ought to be bright and interesting. The leading parts will 
be taken by Louise Manfred, Mamie Taylor, Henry Norman and 
Max Figman. 

# v # 

The clever stock company at the Grand Opera House has 
strengthened its popularity with our theatre-goers by the good 
work done in The Great Metropolis. Although* the piece has met 
with great success, it will be replaced next week by Harbor Lights, 
well-known melodrama full of strong scenes and stirring stage 
mechanisms, which will be given full play. Patti comes to this 
house February 3rd., and will stay with us three weeks. Mme. 
Patti evidently did not study our calender correctly this year, for 
she generally comes here during Lent, when our unsuspecting so- 
ciety folk draw no tighter the strings of their money bags than 
they do at any other time. She comes to us this vear a short 
time before Lent. This is her farewell tour. 

# # # 

The Boston Specialty Company's worthy constellations are 
still shining brightly at the California. A more commendable 
specialty company nas not been seen here in a long time, and for 
freshness of features and general originality it deserves praise. 

# # # 
^ That very feeble effort at burlesque, pantomine and comedy, 
Spider and Fly, will take its departure after to-morrow night, to 
wrestle with the purses of the people in the remaining California 
show towns. Vernona Jarbeau, the talented French comedienne, 
will appear in Strictly Confidential, Monday night. The comedy 



was especially written for Miss Jarbeau, and is said to be lively 
and humorous. 

# # # 

The new Gilbert & Sullivan opera, The Gondoliers, or the Kings 
of Barataria, the tenth of the unique series of comic operas planned 
by these talented authors, is a grand success, according to the 
latest telegraphic dispatches. The plot of the new opera is Gil- 
bertian in every way. It depends upon the adventures of two al- 
leged brothers, living in Venice, in love with the same girl. It 
turns out next that the gondoliers are not brothers, and that one 
of them is heir to the vacant throne of Barataria; but no one can 
decide which of the two brothers is the fortunate heir. There is 
an infinite amount of complication before things are happily set- 
tled, and all the incidents involve the true Gilbert humor. The 
authors have gone out of their regular line by introducing five 
maidens instead of three, and by having the scene of their opera 
in some other country than Europe. The English papers speak 
very highly of the work, and describe the music as being •• irre- 
sistible in its spontaneous gaiety," and " refined and thoroughly 
characteristic of the composer." Vanity Fair says: "The dialogue 
ripples along like a smiling brook, and it is eveu less freely pep- 
pered with quips and cranks than usual. It is singularly free 
from the saturnine death's-head paradoxes in which Mr. Gilbert 
reveled when dealing with The Mikado and The Yeomen of the 
Guard." A singular fact is, that there is not a single solo in the en- 
tire opera; thus Sir Arthur gives no principal a chance to gain 
more applause than the rest of the cast. Al. Hayman has se- 
cured the rights to produce it west of Pittsburg, and we may see 
it sooner than was expected. 

# # # 

Miss Lena Devine's concert at Irving Hall on Wednesday even- 
ing, January 8, 1890, promises to be one of the most brilliant 
concerts ever given in this city. Miss Devine is well known in 
musical and social circles in this city, and her numerous friends 
are all anxious to hear her after her great success in Europe. 
Mise Devine has been absent for over four years. During this 
time she has studied with the great maestro, Lamperti, and under 
his personal direction made her d€hv.t, and since then has appeared 
with increasing success in Italy, Nice, Baden-Baden and London, 
where she will return next season to fulfill engagements which 
she has signed. Miss Devine's voice is a beautiful high soprano 
of great range, flexibility and unusual sweetness. The assistants 
at this concert will be Mrs. H. J. Stewart, the finest pianist on the 
coast; Mr. A. Wilkie, tenor; Mr, H. J. Stewart, and the Henry 
Heyman String Quartette. Mr. Henry Heyman has entire charge 
of this concert; his name is a sufficient guarantee in itself to in- 
sure success. 

* * * 

Miss Emma Nevada has left Paris for Madrid, and Miss Marie 

Van Zandt has an engagement at Lisbon. Verdi is spending 

the winter in a hotel at Milan, engaged in making notes for a new 

opera. & Pall Mall Gazette reporter lately interviewed Emma 

Albani, and makes her say that her repertoire includes twenty 
operas and as many oratorios. He does not give the list of ora- 
torios. We should like to see it. The lady is further credited 
with stating: " I have sung in Sir Arthur Sullivan's works most- 
ly." Leaving his comic operas out of count, Sir Arthur Sullivan 
has written The Prodigal Son, The Martyr of Antioch and Tlie Golden 
Legend. Are these the works upon which, according to the Pall 
Mall Gazette, Albani has been mostly engaged ? On the same au- 
thority we learn that the lady claims to have " created " the part 
of Desdemona in Verdi's Otello. Where? When? Some one 
will have to interview the interviewer.— —Lillian Russell has per- 
fected her arrangements with John W. Morrissey for her appear- 
ance in English opera in May of the coming year. Her contract 
has been under consideration for a long while. At first Miss 
Russell demanded a salary of $200 a night, but this will be con- 
siderably modified. It will be her first appearance in English 
grand opera, and she will sing in The Bonemian Girl, Martha and 

Fra Diavolo. Miss Lettie Aldrich, who is well known in this 

city, will shortly open in Washington under the management of 
Gustave Frohman, in Maid Marian. The play was written by 
Miss Seawell, and so pleased Mr. Frohman that he accepted it on 
the first reading. Miss Aldrich has been spending the last few 
months in New York studying for its production, and great hopes 
are entertained she will carry the play to a brilliant success. She 
is in Washington with her uncle, Senator Stewart, of Nevada. 

California is undoubtedly facile princeps as a horse raising country, 
and naturally where the breeding of fast horses is a specialty, the 
making of fine harness also becomes a specialty. This can be easily 
seen by a visit to the magnificent store of Main & Winchester, 214-220 
Battery street. There every sort of carriage furniture can be found, 
and of the best description.* 



McAlester& Jones, Real Estate Agents and Rent Collectors: Office 
422 Montgomery street. The best regulated office in the city. Men of experi- 
ence, having studied the wants of landlords aud tenants for 28 years; reli- 
able, prompt and responsible in the management of real estate, renting, 
elling and collecting, and taking full charge of property at lowest rates. 

Gilmore's Celebrated Band uses the Decker Bros'. — the artists' — 
piano. Kohler & Chase sole agents, who sell at low prices and on 
easy terms. 



Jan I. : 



SAN FRANCISCO NKWS I.KTTKK. 



A SLAP AT THE SUNDAY PAPER. 

Itmvwhftt Mirprmnp in the present day to notice the eiTorts 
Mill brine made t>y certain religious denominations <>f t li <- old 

:i invi-.liiU m hat they consider the sanctity of 
the Sabbath. One by one. daring the past few decades, the bar- 
riers which the chorch— independent of creed or sect, dissenting 

us well a* orthodox — had set up to restrain the people from the 
indulgence in even innocent and rational recreation, have been 
down and set at naught. Restrictions have been soqghl 
to be laid upon railroad travel on -\ Sunday, and in the British 
[alee these .ire still, to a certain extent, in force, the Sunday ser- 
vice upon most lines being limited to one or two trains. Amuse- 
ments are similarly curtailed in that country; the theatres are 
closed, and even the mild dissipation of a visit to such places as 
the Sydenham Crystal Palace or the Alexandria Park, in London, 
bein£ rather winked at on the part of ecclesiasticism than ap- 
proved. The continental countries of Europe, Catholic as well 
as Frotestant. are much more liberal in this respect. The Catho- 
lic, as a rule, considers that he has ministered sufficiently to his 
spiritual wants by noon, and the rest of the holy day is a holiday 
in fact. The German Protestant takes his family with him to 
the theatre or the concert garden, where the evening is spent in 
innocent enjoyment. Here in America we have long since out- 
run the straitlaced fashions of our Puritan forefathers, and have 
decided every citizen is entitled to follow such lines of business or 
of pleasure as he deems best on Sunday as much as any other day, 
so long as he infringes no law and interterferes with the rights of 
no one else. It is accordingly surprising to find that at the pres- 
ent time the editor of a Sunday paper in Pennsylvania should 
have been censured by the elders of his church, Presbyterian, and 
threatened with excommunication if he persists in its publication. 
He will appeal the matter to the general assembly, and make a 
test case of it. It might, however, be suggested with propriety 
to the presbytery responsible for the above measure, that if they 
mean to act up to the strict letter of the law, as laid down in the 
Fourth Commandment of Moses, it is the Monday and not the 
Sunday paper, the publication of which should be ecclesiastically 
interdicted, inasmuch as the bulk of the work on a morning paper 
is done, as the worthy elders ought to know, on the day previous 
to its issue. Most probably, however, the animus of the measure 
is directed against such of the breathren as indulge in the unholy 
pastime of reading worldly literature upon the Sabbath, and 
thereby diverting their attention from spiritual things; and though 
there are certain papers which it might certainly come under the 
head of " work " to read, it may be reasonably doubted whether 
any such class of work was contemplated by Moses. 

IT WILL NOT WORK. 

THE people understand Governor Waterman, his honesty of 
purpose, integrity and incorruptibility of character. They 
know he has been more of a business governor in every respect 
than any that have preceded him; and if he w ignorant of politics, 
and pays no attention to every whipper-snapper that has sought, 
and still seeks to make an impression upon him, (for his own ends 
and gain), it does no harm to the state; and therefore it will not 
do for those newspapers that have failed to run the office of the 
Governor to suit themselves to ignore him, and treat him and his 
good deeds in behalf of the State with silence. The people are 
not to be deceived by any such action, and it certainly is not in- 
dicative of a very high standard of journalism to pursue such a 
course. The truly great newspaper commends upright and ser- 
viceable conduct in a public official, whether the one in interest is 
a friend or foe of such journal, and when it refuses to give credit 
to a public servant who has done well by the people he serves, 
such an act is simply cowardly. Governor Waterman may not 
have met the wishes of every time-serving politician that made a 
demand upon him, but that he has pleased the people cannot be 
gainsaid. He went into office under peculiar circumstances; he 
has been truer to his party obligations than his party has been to 
him, simply because he could not be used. No man could have 
occupied higher or more dignified ground than he did, when in 
his brief, but determined letter to the Attorney-General he cut the 
gordian knot that held Justice Field of the U. S. Supreme Court 
in the toils, and settled a vexed question by a stroke of his pen, 
giving him a national reputation. He has made the prisons of 
the State almost self-sustaining by his business like administra- 
tion of those great interests; and, at the close of his present term, 
they will be in such a condition that $5,000 per month will be 
all the State will be asked to appropriate in behalf of those at San 
Quentin. The construction of the great dam at Folsom, at his 
suggestion, is a monument to his far-seeing business purpose, for 
it will be of incalculable benefit to the State. His prompt action 
in connection with the floods at Sacramento, his appeal to the 
government to aid in saving the great valley from destruction, 
and the prompt response which came from the government, plac- 
ing at the disposal of the proper officers nearly $111,000, for the 
purpose mentioned, all go to prove how earnest Governor Water- 
man is in behalf of the State, and that the silence of the "Satanic" 
press cannot stifle the story of his well-doing; the people know 
the stuff he is made of, and have entire confidence in his official 
life. 



January H, 181)0 



IRVING HALL. 

WEDNESDAY EVEHDKI 

CONCERT BY 
MISS LENA DEVINE, 

(First appearance after four years' absence in Europe), 

ASSISTED BY 

MRS. II. J. STEWART, I'ianlslo, 

MR. ALFRED WILKIE, Tenor, 
Henry lleyniaii's String Quartette 

AND 

MR H. J. STEWART, M. B. 

Henry Heyman Musical Director. 

ESF~ Reserved Seats at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s Music Store. 

BALDWIN THEATRE. 

Mr. Al. Hayman, Lessee and Proprietor | Alfred Bouvier, Acting Manager 

Matinee To-day at 2. Last Night of .the Brilliant Spectacular Comic 
Opera, 

THE QUEEN'S MATE I 

Gorgeous Costumes! Elaborate and Wonderful Scenery! Brilliant Elec- 
tric Effects ! Grand March of Surpassing Beauty! 200 People on the 
Stage! Presented by the Famous J. C. DUFF COMIC OPERA COMPANY. 

Commencing January fith, this Theatre will be closed for one week. 

Monday, January 13tU— EMMA JUCH'S GRAND ENGLISH OPERA 
COMPANY. Seats ready Monday, January 6th. 

THE GRAND OPERA SEASON. 

BALDWIN THEATRE Monday, January 1 3th 

Mr. Hayman takes pleasure in presenting to the music-loving public of* 
San Francisco, the 

EMMA JUCH GRAND ENGLISH OPERA COMPANY. 

100 MEMBERS ! 40 ORCHESTRA ! 50 CHORUS! 

Conductor Ad. Neuendorff | Stage Director Emil Hahn 

(Under the direction of Chas. E. Locke). 

FOURTEEN PERFORMANCES OF GRAND OPERA IN ENGLISH. 

Repertoire for First Week : 

Monday, January 13th FAUST I Thursday MARITANA 

Tuesday TROVATORE Friday CARMEN 

Wednesday MIGNON | Sat'day Matinee. .BOHEMIAN GIRL 

Saturday Evening FREISCHUTZ. 

Special.— Notwithstanding the expense incurred iu bringing this Com- 
pany across the contineut, the same prices will prevail as charged in New 
York, Philadelphia aud Boston. 

Best Reserved Seats $3, $1.50, $1. 

The Sale of Seats for first week will commence Mouday, January 6th, 
at 9 a. m. 

NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Handsomest Theatre in the World. 

Mr. Al Hayman, Lessee and Proprietor | Mr. Harry Mann Manager 

MATINEE TO-DAY— Prices— 25c. 50c, 75c. Best Reserved Seats. 
The Big Boom! Theatre Packed Nightly! The Great 

BOSTON HOWARD ATHEN/EUM COMPANY. 
Giant Pioneers of High-Class Vaudeville. 
Evening Prices— 25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00. All Reserved. 
Matinee Pri ces— 25c, 50c and 75c. Best Reserved Seats. . 

NEW BOSH-STREET THEATRE. 

M.B. Leavitt... Lessee and Proprietor | J. J. Gottlob Manager 

This afternoon at 2. To-night at 8. Fraser and Gill's Burlesque Extrava- 

ganZa ' SPIDER AND FLY I 

The Great Triple Troupe, embracing— 1st. A Popular Pantomime Com- 
pany; 2d. A Brilliant Burlesque Organization; 3d. A High-Class Vaudeville 

Monday, January GtU— The Charming Comedienne, VERNONA JAR- 
BEAU, and her Comedy Company. 
Seats now on s ale. i 

ALCAZAR THEATRE. 

Wallenbod & Stockwell Managers 

Matinee To-day. Best Seats— 25c and 50e. Every Night precisely at 8. 
The Scenic Sensation, MANK , ND1 

Bach Scene a Painter's Masterpiece. 
Best Seats iEvenings)-25c, 50c, 75e. ,„„,,„„„ 

Seats on sale six days in advance without extra charge. 

GRAND OPERA HOOSE. ~ 

Maguibe, Rial & Osbooene Managers 

No-night- the QREAT METROpoLIS i 

Have you seen this Glorious Play ? This Week will be the Last Oppor- 

tU Moiwlay Evening, January 6, 1890-A Majestic Production ol 
HARBOR LIGHTS I 



TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 



Kbbling Baos Proprietors and Managers 

AIDAI 
a r.reat Triumph ! Second Week I Standing Room Only ! A Gorgeous 
Produotfon : UorVttos, containing full English text of "Arda," distributed 
FREE OP CHARGE. 
Prices for Aida— 75c, 50c and 25c. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 4, 1889 




THERE is not a more imposing spectacle under the sun than 
Lawyer Delmas. From the shining tops of his patent leather 
shoes to the glistening crown of his immaculate beaver he is the 
sum of perfection. From the smiling appearance of his self- 
satisfied countenance to his peculiar intonation of the English 
language there is no argument to the assertion that Mr. Delmas 
considers himself and his kind the summum bonum of creation. 
Indeed, it is to be hoped that it is so. Lawyer Delmas deserves 
credit. Sprung from lowly parents, he has, by methods which 
are considered unwarrantably " smart," accumulated quite a tidy 
sum of money ; and if anybody is curious enough to learn how he 
obtained his start, the volume, and also the pages, of the Califor- 
nia Reports shall be told him after communicating with ibis office. 
But, after all, is the possession of brains a blessing ? Is Delmas 
the lawyer as much to be admired as that good and noble brother 
of his— Joe, the pork butcher, in San Jose? There is not a soul 
in San Jose who dare say a word against him. He has never 
gouged bis patrons— rather call them clients— in their pork chops. 
They have always been sweet and fresh, and the chops do not 
come from a porker which has been fed by Chinamen. No. 
Delmas' pork chops are the pride of San Jose, because they 
are good, and because when he sells a pound the chops 
weigh a pound. The pork butcher Delmas, of San Jose ; does 
not, after he has assisted a poor hog-raiser to defend his pigs 
from a pack of thieves who would steal them, take nearly all of 
the animals in lieu of his services, and then threaten the man 
with the law to protect his unjustifiable action. On the contrary, 
the pork butcher is glad that he has been able to do what is right, 
and the payment he takes is moderate and in fair proportion. 
Nor does Delmas thepork butcher— whose sausages have nottheir 
equal in Santa Clara County — discharge employes without pay 
because they have failed in a series of "skinning" operations. 
By old and young, by those who have been regaled sumptuously 
on his pork chops and sausages and other delicate parts of the 
hog, and by those Who have not eaten of them but intend to do 
so, Delmas, the pork butcher of San Jose, is spoken of in terms 
of pride, love and veneration, and were he ambitious he could 
easily be elected to the high and honorable position of Pound- 
master, which office he would discharge honestly, and cause stout 
comparisons to be made with his brother, who was once in the 
District Attorney's office of that county. But Delmas, the seller 
of good, sweet, fresh pork chops is not ambitious. He is happy 
now, for he is confident that his business and his income will 
very largely increase, as his nephew 7 and niece are such favorites 
with our Four Hundred that they will naturally advertise among 
their friends the goodness of his porcine cuts, and get him several 

new customers. 

# * < 

A certain young gentleman, who has but lately arrived in 
this city by the Panama route, gives excellent promise of 
making his mark in the social, literary and mercantile hemi- 
spheres. There is a general top-loftiness about him which augurs 
unfavorably for any man not from Harvard, and so much savoir 
faire and savoir vivre that it is very evident that socially we shall 
not suit him. His advent among us is owing to the peculiar fond- 
ness a millionaire has for young gentlemen who have been under 
an alleged course of study at this college, because he vainly be- 
lieves that this system of education has a beneficial effect both 
upon the mind and upon the manners. This Harvardian sprig of 
culture, on boarding the good steamer San Jose, proceeded to make 
things lively, as the vernacular has it, and usurped the time-hon- 
ored privileges both of the master and the purser of the ship. 
He selected such people as he wished to sifc with at meals, and 
appealed to the Captain when the purser made a remonstrance. 
Finally, to please the bumptious boy, the purser yielded; but great 
was his wrath when he discovered that the people whom he had 
selected to sit at meat with him refused to tolerate his presence, 
and informed the Captain that rather than be at the table over 
which he cast his superabundant effulgence they would dine with 
the stokers in an empty coal bunker. Alas for Harvard culture! 

* « * 

The immortal Captain Schenck, of the Navy, who never crossed 
the bay without feeling certain qualms suggestive of physical 
disturbance, has been transferred from this sphere of unuseful- 
ness to Philadelphia. It is only known to Captain Schenck and 
his conscience what he did. Men about town know what he 
did, but that was not in the line of nautical business, though it 
was decidedly naughty. Anyhow, it is a moot question whether 
Captain Schenck is or is not intimately posted about some naval 
affairs. Philadelphia gentlemen, who fondly believe their wives 
to be above the wiles of assiduous flattery, should not introduce 
this phenomenon of a Naval Captain, who has never been to sea, 
into their homes. 

« # » 

" What on earth can be the matter with Ballenberg? " exclaim- 
ed a society belle (of some seasons) the other night, as that 



Prince of dance musicians struck up a waltz. " Why, that's as 
old as the hills. It's Barden Lieder." " I guess it's out of com- 
pliment to the German Leader," replied her partner. " He's 
ditto." 

* * * 

"Well, I do declare now," said Henry Redington, as he sat 

down on the stairs with Miss "What is it this time? A 

marriage," coyly inquired that most fascinating little flirt, as she 
looked at him with one lustrous eye round the corner of her 
point lace fan ; her thoughts running on Besique, of course. " I 
don't see the sequence of your remark," answered Henry, in that 
matter of fact way which has kept him in " maiden meditation 
fancy free " these many, many years — oh, we dare not hint how 
long. << I was only going to say, if Carrie hasn't employed a new 
dressmaker who presses down the seams of her sleeves." 

# * * 

"Sam Mayer?" she gently enquired. " That's his name, is it!" 
She had only been six weeks on the coast, poor thing, and 
wasn't up to much. " What's his business? " " He's a singer," 
the young man told her. "A silent singer, eh?" "Silent? 
Depends on what you call silent." " I wonder if he's any rela- 
tion of the man grandfather used to tell us about when we were 
children," she went on musingly; " a man who was noted for his 
singing of ■ The Anchor's Weighed?' " " A relation! " quoth her 
friend. " He's the man himself." 

* * • 

Let no woman think to elevate to her standard the man she 
has married for his money. In this city, several years ago, a 
pretty young creature married a well-known millionaire, cele- 
brated as Bluebeard for his many wives and love affairs. She 
made the sacrifice for the sake of her family, and then, woman- 
like, tried to make the best of it by educating her precious exam- 
ple of a husband up to the proper standard. But, unfortunately, 
he was as illiterate as he was wealthy. She began by reading 
aloud to him. If it had been one of Zola's, one would have 
thought it quite fitting. He listened a while, and then said: 
" What's that you're reading?" " Why, its ' Miles Standish's 
Courtship,' dear." "What? I am astonished at you reading 
such a book as that. I won't have my wife read the courtship 
of any man." " But it is by Longfellow." " I don't care whether 
it is by Longfellow or Shortfeliow. Put it in the fire. I won't 
have such a book in my house." And into the fire it went. 

The woman who has a bad skin can easily cure its defects by using 
Mme. Rachel's Bloom of Youth for the complexion. 

MOET & CHANDON 



azHz^nviiiF^a-iN-E. 




"WHITE SEAL," Rich and Dry. 
"BRUT IMPERIAL," 

ACKNOWLEDGED 

THE FINEST 

BRUT WIN"E 

IN THE WORLD. 

Sole Agents, 

Sherwood & Sherwood, 

212-214 Market Street, S. F. 

ESTABUSHEI> 1834. 

GEORGE MORROW & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

PRIVATE TRADE SOLICITED. 

39 Clay Street, - - - San Francisco. 



Jan. t. 1889 



SAN FK VXC1SCO MOWS LETTKK. 



9 



THE RAILROADS. 



NOTWITHSTANDING the feet that the courts have decided 
that the railroad company is under no legal obligation to pay 
taxes levied under the new Constitution, the Southern Pacific 
Company paid into the State treasury last Monday v ^..iv < - 
This action on the part of the railroad company is in keeping 
with its past record. Its managers have always been ready and 
willing to pay their full share of the expenses of the State and 
county governments. Kven in the cases which -were litigated, 
and most bitterly on the part of the State's officers, the company, 
at the end of the litigation, and after a decision in its favor, paid 
the State treasury hundreds of thousands of dollars. There never 
has been any desire on the part of the company to shirk any bur- 
den or evade the payment of any tax. The contest arose because 
of a determination on the part of certain State officials to avail 
themselves of the provision of the new Constitution to cinch the 
railroad companies. The litigation which ensued thoroughly 
tested the constitutionality of the State provisions, and the Su- 
preme Court of the United States, after the most mature consid- 
eration, sustained the corporations, and decided that the entire 
scheme of taxation of railroad property under the new Constitu- 
tion was invalid. Their provisions are as worthless to-day as 
they were when that decision was rendered, and if the railroad 
company were so inclined it could successfully resist the collection 
from it of a single dollar of taxation. It chooses, however, to 
bear its full proportion of public burdens and pay its taxes. It is 
more than probable that very few private individuals would pur- 
sue a similar course. 



A railroad locomotive is not the handiest of things to steal, but 
it seems there is an enterprising gentleman in Alabama who es- 
sayed sucb a theft a few days ago. The following from an East- 
ern paper, shows how the daring robber performed this feat: i( A 
locomotive was stolen from the Alabama Great Southern Railroad 
Company at Tuscaloosa lately. The thief enjoyed a ride of eight 
miles, narrowly missed a collision with a freight train, was shot 
at, leaped from the running engine and escaped. To the officials 
of the road the affair is a mystery. A freight train is made up at 
Tuscaloosa late at night, and while it was waiting for the south- 
bound fast express to pass, and the engine was on a siding, un- 
coupled from the train. Just after the express passed, the freight 
train crew saw a man throw the switch open to the main track, 
leap into the cab of the engine, open the throttle, and he was 
gone like a flash with the locomotive. As quick as possible the 
crew secured guns, and boarding a switch engine, started in pur- 
suit of the locomotive and the thief. It was nine miles to the 
first station north, and a through freight going south was follow- 
ing close behind the express. A mile from Cottondale, the first 
station, the pursuers came insight of the stolen locomotive. They 
opened fire at the man in the cab, and he slowed up a little, 
leaped from the engine and escaped in the woods. The men on 
the switch engine had no time to follow. They heard the roar of 
the fast approaching freight train, and with less than ten seconds 
to spare, got the two engines on a side track in time to avoid a 
collision." 

The whole amount of taxes for the year 1889 charged upon the 
railroads assessed to the State Board of Equalization was $668,- 
024.45, of which $292,328.06 was for State purposes, and $375,696.- 
09 for counties through which the roads run. Of these taxes $667,- 
778.37 has been paid, leaving $245.78 delinquent, which is due 
from the Pullman Palace Car Company, the only company as- 
sessed by the State Board of Equalization which failed to make 
payment of its taxes. The amounts paid into the State Treasury 
have been distributed to the several funds as follows: General 
Fund, $199,132.08; School Fund, $78,114.82; Interest and Sink- 
ing Fund. $8,094.80; State University Fund, $4,047.40; Grammar- 
School Course Fund, $2,833.18; Railway Tax Fund for the several 
counties, $375,556.09. Total, $667,778.37. 



A railroad official, when speaking of the late Franklin B. Gowen, 
said that one of his most marked characteristics was a dislike of 
riding on a pass, and his custom was to pay his fare when riding 
over the Philadelphia and Reading road at the time he was Presi- 
dent of it. Neither would he ride over his road in a sumptuous 
private car, riding on the ordinary express trains usually. When 
he went on a special mission he rode on his little blue dummy, 
the "Ariel," which flew over the main line when he was' in a 
hurry. 

The bridges and railroad tracks which were washed out in South- 
ern California, will be replaced in three or four days, and traffic 
will be resumed to all points. The Atchison company has been 
particularly unfortunate, having lost a large number of its bridges 
and many miles of its road. 



A. N. Towne left New York on Tuesday for New Orleans, on 
his way for home. 

For Neckties that are matchless in their beauty go to J. W. Car- 
many & Co., 25 Kearny street. 



Messrs. Deutz & Geldermann's 

GRAND VIN d'AY 




GOLD LACK SEC! 

in Magnums, Quarts and Pints, 

OF THE FAMOUS 1884 VINTAGE. 

For Sale in bond or duty paid by 

Charles Meinecke & Co., 



April 20. | 



Sole Agents Pacific Coast. 



FINE FURNITURE ! 



We are in receipt of many novelties in odd 
pieces of FURNITURE, among which may be 
mentioned MAHOGANY, 

ANTIQUE OAK, 

And BRASS EASELS, LADIES' WRITING 
DESKS, PARLOR and MUSIC CABINETS, 
FANCY CHAIRS, ROCKERS, TABLES, 
SCREENS, PEDESTALS, BOOK CASES, etc. 

Late designs in PARLOR, DINING-ROOM, 
LIBRARY, CHAMBER and HALL FURNITURE, 
BRASS BEDSTEADS in great variety. 

Sole Agents tor the Welch Folding Beds. 

W. & J. SLOANE & CO., 

Carpets, Furniture and Upholstery, 
641-647 Market Street. 




Mackintoshed Coats 4 Cloaks 



— FOE — 

MEN AND WOMEN. 



GOODYEAR RUBBER CO. 



R. H. PEASE, Jr., 



Agents. 



S. M. RUNYON, 
577 and 579 Market St., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 




MILLBRAE DAIRY, 

THE MODEL DAIRY OF CALIFORNIA. 

F. H. GREEN, Proprietor. C. H. TILTON, Manager. 

PURE COUNTRY MILK AND CREAM 

Produced from healthy cows, wholesome feed, and rich pastures. Fresh 

from Millbrae, San Mateo County, twice daily. Delivery 

to all parts of the city. 

The farm and city departments are open to Inspection at all times 

Office and Depot : MISSION AND NINTH STREETS, 

Branches: Second and Mission Streets, Streets. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 4, 1889£ 



PUGILISTIC— Billy Murphy and Ike Weir are recovering nice- 
ly from the wounds that caused a postponement of their pro- 
posed meeting. Providing these two erratic young gentlemen do 
not handle guns or go in swimming between now and the night 
of the 13th instant, the California Athletic Club's members may 
see the featherweight International combat on that date. Weir 
has been attending to his training, and there is no doubt that he 
will be in condition. As to Murphy he is always fit. 

There is nothing decided yet as to the McAuliffe-Carroll fight 
for the light-weight championship. At first McAuliffe declared 
he could not fight at 133 pounds, and he waived the light-weight 
championship, providing he could be allowed in the ring at 138 
pounds. Carroll accepted this, and McAulitfe's chuckle could be 
heard all over the East. It was proposed then that February 
should bring the men together, and now, when there is a chance 
to sign articles and put up forfeits, the Eastern man has a sore 
finger that " will necessitate a lengthy postponement." If 
McAuliffe cares for the good will of this paradise for fighters, he 
had better cure that finger quickly and take his chances against 
Jimmy Carroll. The people here like fair dealing, and McAuliffe 
does not bear the best reputation since his fight with Carney, 
when the latter was given such a poor show. Apropos of that 
battle, Americans have no right to raise such an outcry against 
the rutiianisni displayed by Smith's friends when he fought 
Slavin. When Carney and McAuliffe fought, the same unfair 
proceedings took place. The acts of one, however, do not justify 
those of the other, but it is only the men who are fair-minded in 
sports, irrespective of nationality, who may rightfully raise their 
voices. The question seems to be — where are those fair-minded 
sports to be found' There are so few of them elsewhere, that 
without being too egotistical, we can say — right here. Is that 
the reason McAuliffe has a sore finger? 

Immediatelv following the Murphy-Weir battle at the C. A. C. 
the Dempsey-McCarthy fight will take place. Both men are in 
training and doing well. 

Sometime this month the Occidental Club will give a fight be- 
tween Joe Bowers and Billy Smith, the Sydneyite, who defeated 
Frank Glover. 

Billy Naughton, the newspaper man who went to Europe in 
advance of Peter Jackson, has written the following to friends 
here regarding the great dusky heavy weight: 

Hotel Continental, Paris, December 8, 1889.— I send you a few notes on 
the pugilistic situation in Euglaud, which may be of use to you. As you 
will notice, my letter is dated from the French capital. The fact is that 
Jackson, Fitzpatrick, Parson Davies and myself have been spending a few 
days here. The others went back on Sunday last to tour the English 
provinces, and I elected to stay here a while and visit some of the points of 
interest. Well, it goes without saying that since Jackson put Smith down 
he (Peter) has been fairly worshiped by the " toffs " in Englaud. He has 
been flooded with presents, one which he thinks a lot of being a dumb-bell 
pin composed of sapphires and diamonds, the gift of Lord Lonsdale, who 
passed through California eight or nine months ago. Smith has fallen in 
public estimation in the same proportion that Jackson has risen. The noble 
Pelicans have no further use for him. The management of the Royal 
Aquarium, Westminster, secured Jackson and Smith for a nine nights' en- 
gagement, commencing November 14th. They proved a big attraction. 
Since that Jackson has sparred at Plymouth, Portsmouth and Brighton, and 
to-night he opens at Leeds. He will, after the principal English cities have 
been visited, tour Wales, Scotland and Ireland, and after that the intention 
at present is to return to America, leaving Liverpool on January 14th. 

The boxing season in London has been injured by the action of the head 
of the Police Department, who issued a manifesto declaring that the police 
would not be allowed to preserve order at boxing tournaments and con- 
tests. This, of course, meant mob law in London at big affairs, and several 
indoor fixtures had to be canceled. Among them was Ben Hyams' mon- 
ster tournament at Agricultural Hall, and two or three important ten and 
twelve round contests. Frank Murphy is the lion of the hour in Birming- 
ham. He bad a benefit recently, and gathered in a few shekels. He bas 
been telling his old friends that he is in a hurry to get back to America, 
and as they are anxious to see him perform before he leaves England's 
shores again, they have raised a purse of £100, for which he will box one 
T>f his class named Johnstone shortly iu the London district. 

Of course you have heard that Charley Mitchell and Jem Mace are to box 
three rounds for £500 a side. It will take place in a few weeks' time, and 
the indications are that the attendance will be large. 

There is a wrestling boom at present pervading London. Tom Cannon is 
in the thick of it, and all the principal London music halls have their 
troupes of either French or Cumberland wrestlers. Antoine Pierre is also 
to the fore, and has earned the name of the "terrible Greek," by the man- 
ner in which he has been throwing his opponents around at the Canterburv 
Music Hall. W. W. NaughtoN. 

Nothing yet has been done to sign Jackson and Sullivan; in 
fact, Major McLaughlin, who bas returned only lately from 
Europe, and who has seen both men, is of the opinion that it 
will be a long time yet before they cun be brought together. Sulli- 
van insists on $15,000 being offered as a purse, and until he gets 
that he will not fight. 

BASEBALL— Despite the wet weather the St. Louis Browns 
and Bostons succeeded in playing their last three games, and 
gave exhibitions that more than pleased the large audiences who 
witnessed them. Latham, with his running, jests and antics, is 
the feature of the Browns, and is surprisingly active in his move- 
ments, his frame seeming to be set on wires. As both clubs play 
earnestly, with a desire to win, the result has been good games. 
While both clubs field about equally well, the Browns are more 



successful at the bat; they will play here this afternoon and to- 
morrow. If the weather is favorable they may remain here an- 
other week. Then the Bostons will go to Los Angeles to play off 
an engagement there, and the Browns to Portland, Oregon. As 
none of the local clubs have played with the latter club, a picked 
nine will perhaps give them one game. This will be first-rate 
practice for the home players, as it will teach them a point or 
two. All the Eastern players now here regret that San Francisco 
is not closer to the East. They recognize this city as being a 
great ball place, and would like to have it in the circuit of one of 
the large leagues. Nash says he is ready and willing to come out 
here next winter and take his chances on the weather. Although 
Fogarty and Fred Carroll are prominent brotherhood players, it 
is said neither has yet signed a Brotherhood players contract. 
San Francisco, Oakland and Sacramento have sent contracts east 
for players to sign, and by the end of this month they will be in 
shape, with few vacancies to fill. 

YACHTING — Commodore Macdonough's new yacht is still on 
the ways at Benicia. Her builder has had her hull com- 
pleted for several weeks, but has been compelled to delay the 
launch on account of the slowness shown by the makers of the 
steel rudder. News of the launching of the new yacht may be 
looked for in the next issue of the News Lettee. Lurline is still 
at her moorings at Sausalito. but she will soon be taken up to 
Benicia where she will be replanked from end to end. Her frame 
is in perfect condition, but her planking has become soft like a 
great many other yachts built of California timber. No other 
changes will be made in Lurline unless the Messrs. Spreckels 
should decide to alter the trim of her ballast below the deck. She 
has no superior in finish and appointments on either the Pacific 
or Atlantic Coast. The handsome little cutter built by the Messrs. 
Davidson at North Beach from lines and drawings furnished by 
Burgess is still on the stocks. Her builders and owners are wait- 
ing for fine weather to launch their new craft. Nellie is still in 
commission. Col. Donahue will not lay her up until Commodore 
Macdonough's newyacht makes herappearance; Nellie will be on 
hand to set the pace for the new cutter on her first cruise. 

FOOTBALL. — This splendid winter sport has been delayed this 
season by the weather. California footballers have not 
learned to play in the rain. The San Francisco players have been 
in training for some weeks, and now that the University men 
have recovered from the holidays, the two teams maybe expected 
to meet immediately after the weather becomes settled. Messrs. 
Kittle and Harrison have taken the lead in getting the San Fran- 
cisco men into form, and they have succeeded in securing a fine 
team. The names include many high class college men, who 
have upheld the honor of Yale and Harvard, and should, when 
they appear upon local grounds, do gallant work. 

ZPOUVCnyCEIEt'X" SEC 




OIHI.A.JVLIF.^GI-IN'IE]! 

The brand used by H. R. H. the Prince of Wales. 

Wm. Wolff & Co., Sole Agents, 

105 Front Street, San Francisco. Cal. 



THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, 

on Market Corner Tenth Street, 

Is the most realistic and interesting Battle Scene ever produced. Read 
what General Howard aud others say of it in our Catalogue. 

OPEN 9 A. m. to 11 P. M. ___^__ 

CALIFORNIA LEAGUE BASE BALL GROUNDS. 

End of Haight-street Cable Road. 
CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES. 

To-day at 2:30 p. M BOSTONS vs. ST. LOUIS BROWNS 

To-morrow at 2 p. M BOSTONS vs. ST. LOUIS BROWNS 

Admission, 25 cents. Reserved seats on Sundays, 26 cents extra. Ladles 
free on Thursdays and Saturdays. 




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Jan. 4, 1839. 



SAN KRAXCTSCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



TWO UPS AND ROSES. 
A Recollection. 



Once 'neath Cathedral dome— 
ffol Saint Peter's of Koine, 
But "Mary's" here at home — 

I saw a gentle girl; 
With roses in her hand 
That followed Love's command, 
Nor could the spell withstand 

Of perfuming this pearl. 
And the girl? She looked down — 
And the roses couldn't frown. 
But held their leaves, though brown, 

Craving for Love's sips; 
VThen the brown leaves turned green 
As ever man had seen, 
In all their beauteous sheen 

Drinking from her lips. 
Ah, me! that day how I 
Would give my life and die 
And forfeit earth and sky 

Could I but be that rose ! 
That 1 might touch that lip, 
And from it honey sip, 
And in it my soul dip 

In love's life-long repose! 
San Francisco, December 28, 1889. Patrick M. King. 



OUR CENTRAL, AMERICAN NEIGHBORS. 



WHILST the Central American delegates are at Washington, 
endeavoring to bring about a closer commercial connection 
with the United States, their people at home are hard at work at 
an effort to accomplish a closer union among themselves. Meas- 
ures have been adopted that promise results of very considerable 
importance. A practical movement has been set on foot, looking 
to the unification of the Central American States, through a sys- 
tem of federation. In many respects the system to be adopted 
will follow the political methods in force in the United States. A 
Congress which has been for some time in session at San Salvador, 
has adopted a name for the new federated States. They are to 
be called the States of the Republic of Central America. It is a 
long and not very euphonious designation, but Spanish speaking 
people are accustomed to lengthy titles. The Republic is to have 
as Chief Executive a President, who will hold office for one year, 
and whose powers and duties will resemble those of the President 
of the United States. The office is to be filled by representatives 
of each of the five contracting States in turn. Commerce in 
natural productions will be free between the States, as will that 
in manufactured articles, except where it would interfere with a 
government monopoly in the country into which the introduction 
of such articles is sought, or where the manufacture of the article 
is forbidden. The day of small independent States is apparently 
passing away. Of course the interest of this country in the mat- 
ter is that our neighbors shall eschew political revolutions, and 
constitute themselves strong, healthy and vigorous States. The 
more united they are, the better neighbors and customers they 
will be. Internal dissensions and disintegration have too long 
prevailed for the permanent good and prosperity of these little re- 
publics. Signs on every hand indicate an improving condition of 
affairs. 



'ARABIAN MUSIC ROOM.' 



New Artotype Series.— Plate 28. 



RWEISSE, in his picture, "Arabian Music Room," shows a 
. just appreciation of Oriental characteristics and customs, 
and has faithfully portrayed them. He has a remarkable aptitude 
for painting marble and silken fabrics, and it is said that in this 
he excels even the touch of his former master, the great Ge"rome. 
There is a wonderful amount of detail in this painting, and the 
tracery and veins on the great marble slab which forms the back- 
ground of the scene, are wonderfully true. The figure work is 
especially good. That of the girl with the long-stringed instru- 
ment in her hand, is full of grace, and with all the languorous 
beauty which is generally supposed to be the heritage of Asiatic 
women. Weisse is a Parisian, and has had pictures in the Salons 
of 1887 and 1888, this being a Salon picture. He belongs to the 
Society of French artists, and has received numerous medals. I; 
was by a stroke of good fortune that Mr. Gump succeeded in ge 
ting this and another one, which is the interioT of an Arabian 
Mosque. Mr. Weisse is a great favorite in Paris, and the snatch- 
ing away from that city of these two master-pieces was not very 
pleasing to the Parisians. 

Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-409 Montgomery street. 

W. H. Patrick, Teacherof the Piano, removed to 428 Geary Street. 



OIL AND COLOR PAINTINGS 

.A.T -A-TTCTIOIT ! 

WE WILL SELL AT AUCTION, ON 

MONDAY AND TUESDAY, - - - January 13th and 14th, 

At 12 o'clock noon, at store of 

MESSRS. DEAKIN BROS. & CO, 

No. 33 Post Street, under Mechanics' Library, 

AN ELEGANT LINE OF 
Imported Oil «* Water-color Paintings 

AND 

English Etchings, 

Selected with the greatest care, as the personal 

work of one of the best connoisseurs on this 

Coast, and imported direct by Messrs. 

DEAKIN BROS. & CO. 

THE OFFERING ALSO INCLUDES A COLLECTION OF 

Japanese Curias ; Magnificent Carved Cabinets i Quilts, hand 

embroidered ; Articles of Vertu, etc, etc. 
Satsuma Ware, Bronzes, etc. 



Goods now on exhibition at the store of Deakin 
Bros. & Co., No. 33 Post Sireet, near Kearny, 
and -we recommend the offering as an op- 
portunity for art buyers and 
connoisseurs. 

Sale is peremptory, as the premises must be 
vacated on January 18th, to be occupied by the 
new Savings Bank. 

Easton, Eldridge & Co., 

Auctioneers. 



BBRTOIT SEC 




A NATURAL AND FRUITY WINE 

EM. MEYER & CO., 



Sole Agents Pacific Coast, 



413 and 415 Pine Street. 




THE preferred stationery for ladies is linen paper without gloss, 
white or cream-tinted, smooth or rough in finish, and of the 
standard octavo size, to fold once in a square envelope. Medium 
rough paper and etching paper similar to that prepared for etchers 
is used by those who write with stubs or with quill pens. Inser- 
tion paper is a fancy novelty with alternate thick and thin lines 
across the page. The colored papers most used are pale blue or 
rose-tinted, dark blue, and gray of several shades, and for these 
are cameo decorations which bring out the design in white relief. 
Monograms of most intricate lettering are again in fashion, stamped 
in colors, or in gold , silver, or any of the colored bronzes, or, new- 
est of all, in steel letters that produce perfectly the effect of the 
metal. Instead of involved monograms, the separate initials in 
quaint odd lettering are preferred by many, or else they are a fac- 
similie of those of the writer. Family crests and coats of arms 
are stamped in the proper heraldic colors. A tasteful marking for 
a young lady's letter-paper, and for the smaller » billet " sheets on 
which she writes her pretty notes, instead of using stiff cards, 
shows the initials of her last name done in brown to imitate a 
woody stem, supporting or surrounding a tiny blossom of her fav- 
orite flower in natural colors— a violet, a wild rose, forget-me-nots, 
a pansy, or a primrose. The useful marking, however, and that 
which is most done, is the city address stamped near the top of 
the page in color in very plain style, as in block letters, or old Eng- 
lish letters, in clear dark blue or red, or in copper, silver, or gold. 
Country addresses are more fancifully done, showing the name of 
the country house and of the nearest post-office engraved amid 
foliage, flowers, pine-trees, beside a lodge gate, or in a bit of rustic 
landscape. 

The London Court Circular says: A beautiful evening dress for a 
young lady is in deep primrose satin, bordered everywhere with 
mouse-colored fur. Velvet loops catch up the skirt with the help of 
a mother-of-pearl clasp. Salmon-pink satin is effective with a similar 
trimming in sealskin. White fur or feather trimming is employed 
for debutantes on white gowns. Swan's down is less successful, as it 
has a trick of wearing off and flying about a ballroom , besides attach- 
ing itself to the black coats of partners. Curly goatskin is much 
liked, also white astrachan, but such trimmings are too remarkable 
for adults in the daytime. 

" Flower o' the May," in London World, speaks thus of a hat which 
she has lately seen: " The most original thing was a large hat of 
re'se' da-green velvet. The crown was full, and the fulness apparently 
kept in place just at the joining of the crown and brim by dots of jet, 
forming a row all round. The broad brim was edged with very light 
black lace, put on quite plain, and turned back flat on the upper side. 
Right in front, on the actual edge of the brim, was a butterfly bow of 
the light black lace, with a jet butterfly placed in the center of it. 
The necessary hight was given a tuft of the curled black osprey. 



Tea gowns and robes de chambre claim their share of fur trim- 
ming. In these, contrasts principally obtain, a dark fur forming 
a foil to a fine light woollen, or a light fur a relief to a dark color. 
The extreme of elegance in robes is to make them of very fine, 
soft, clinging wool, with no silk except in the wadded lining! 
The fur is used for the neck and wrists, and to border a front that 
crosses. Sometimes there is a deep border around the bottom. 
The fronts are cut in one their full length, and are clasped at the 
waist, or are crossed and clasped on one hip with a double clasp 
of metal. 



A watch in a cane or unbrella head is conceded to be a bright 
idea, but something deserving of still more credit, on the same 
principle, is a watch in the cane proper, which has just come to 
light. It is set within three or four inches of the top, and is open- 
faced. In order to wind or regulate this little timepiece, the knob 
of the cane is to be turned, something like a stem-winder. 

Wrappings are classified according to the time of day at which 
they are worn, jackets, capes, and long cloaks of tartan plaid 
with capes being reserved for morning walks and errands, while 
for afternoon calls short mantelets of various forms are worn. 

A fancy of the moment is to wear, with a tailor gown, a small 
fanciful watch of iron, or oxidized to resemble iron, with elab- 
orate gold initials, fastened by a brooch to match on the left front 
of the bodice, as an order or badge would be worn. 



There is absolutely nothing new in trowsers, either in shape or 
pattern. They are cut in a reasonably loose width, and the quiet 
herringbone combinations still have the call. 

FurTand feathers are both abundantly used for trimming wraps 
and costumes. * 



MARVELOUS BARGAINS 
SEASONAB LE DRY GOODS ! 

According to our regular custom, we begin the New Year with a GRAND 
CLEARANCE SALE OF THE BALANCE OF OUR GREAT WINTER 
STOCK, to make room for heavy consignments of spring goods, now in 
transit. To accomplish this result quickly we have made a STARTLING 
CUT IN PRICES that embraces every article in every department, thus 
affording an unparalleled opportunity for purchasers, as our offerings in- 
clude the LATEST STYLES AND NOVELTIES in 
Cloaks, Wraps, Newmarkets, 

Jackets, Jerseys, Shawls, 

Colored Dress Goods, 

Black Dress Goods, 

Silks, Satins, Velvets, 

Laces, Ribbons, Trimmings, 

Gloves, Handkerchiefs, 

Gents' Famishing Goods, 

Corsets, Hosiery, Underwear. 

House Furnishings, etc 



Note.— All are cordially invited to call and inspect our offerings, and 
thus obtain an idea of the IRRESISTIBLE BARGAINS PRESENTED IN 
EVERY DEPARTMENT. 




MARKET AND JONES STREETS 





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Oli? 01 rorjS:p^e{s: 





f e 1 F* re P ,a - ce \ T ' m(T > 



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' r?s? 3o9.3ii,3i3 f 3i5 .-• **~^ 



Jan. 4. 1830. 



s\\ FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 




MRS. ISABEL S. SHEl'AKD, the wife of Captain Shepard, who 
lately commanded the Ruth, has written a very entertaining 

little book entitled *• The Cruise of the D\ B. Steamer Bush in 
Behring Sea — Summer of 1889." Mrs. Shepard is a graceful 
writer, and sees life with unprejudiced eyes, and has the ability 
t to describe what she sees in a realistic manner. She gives numer- 
' ous anecdotes about the various officers she met in the Arctic 
I Ocean, and also glimpses into the customs of the Indians. It is a 
I pity that Mrs. Shepard did not write out the names in full of the 
I officers on the vessels, as the use of dashes instead of proper 
! names destroys, to a certain extent, the value of a story. The 
: book is from the press of The Bancroft Company. 

Mr?. Shepard seems to have a keen relish for the ridiculous, as 
| is shown in her chapter on the seizures, for she quotes averse 

which was sung by a " Lieutenant T ," which runs thus : 

" The Shepard came into our bay with a Rush, 
That's all; that's all. 
He bad swept Behring Sea with a revenue brush, 

That's all; that's all. 
And our Johnny Bull cousins who live in B. C, 
Are shaking their fists at the flag of the free, 
That's all; that's all." 

Alfred Robinson has just published a book of poems, under the 
title of '• California; an Historical Poem," which he respectfully 
dedicates to the Pioneers of this State. Mr. Robinson has written 
some excellent verses, which are perfect pen pictures of the 
scenes they represent. For instance, here is a description of 
Monterey, which opens canto III: 

"The pine-clad hills of Monterey, 
Behold them in their vestments gay, 

Of beauty rare; 
There soaring upward toward the skies, 
In matchless grandeur as they rise, 
8o bright and fair! " 
This also is a piece of pretty descriptive work about San Pedro : 
" Lone, cheerless spot, and desert shore. 
Where surges roll, and ceaseless roar, 

So dull and drear; 
Whose hills reach far beyond the sight, 
Till fading, like the evening light, 
They disappear." 

"Lo! there San Juan's tall peaks arise, 
Upheaving toward the lotty skies, 

And crowned with snow; 
Whilst prairies green, that intervene, 
Make up the grandeur of the scene 

Which lies below." 

There seems to be no lack of poets in California, and the last 
to seek a reputation in poetic honors — who, under the initials 
" J. C. J.," has published, through the Bancroft Company, a his- 
torical poem entitled "Cleopatra" — thus describes the meeting 
between Antony and Cleopatra: 

The head of the Triumvirs — be, proudest of the three, 
Gazed on me but one moment; then bowed him down to me, 
Like as the snows on Atlas down to the healed plain, 
Beneath the rays of Phoebus, in torrents rush amain. 
So, melted by my beauty — the radiance of my smile- 
He poured his soul before me, Enchantress of the Nile". 
This is a fair specimen of " J. C. J.'s " work. 



The best guide book that has yet been printed to Colorado and 
the West comes from the press of R. R. Donnelley & Sons, Chi- 
cago, under the title of (< Over the Range to the Golden Gate," by 
Stanley Wood. It is, in fact, a complete guide, and is liberally 
supplied with maps, which shows the railroad systems in an ad- 
mirable manner. There are also numerous pictures, showing the 
natural wonders of the different States which compose the Great 
West. 

"The San Francisco Blue Book for 1889," by The Bancroft 
Company, is out, and contains a list of our Four Hundred, with 
their reception days and addresses. A new feature of the book 
is that several of the interior towns have been incorporated in it. 
It is a valuable book, not only to society people, but to business 
men as well. 



Mr. Robinson is an old resident of California, having tracked 
here in 1843, and is author of that entertaining book, " Life in 
California," which is one of the first works on California, having 
been published in 1846; whatever he writes about the States is 
with him a labor of love, and into which work he puts all his 
strength. The little volume under review is a sample of this, and 
it shows that Mr. Robinson can write prose and poetry with 
equal facility. The book is for sale by Wm. Doxey. En passant 
it may be said that Mr. Robinson is the father of James Robin- 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
Sole Agents Purimachos Fire-proof Cement, "indestruct- 
ible and infallible." 
Sole Agents for "Bull Dog" brand of Bass' Ale and Guinness' 

STOUT-Bottled by Robert Porter & Co. 
Sole Agents Johnson's Elephant brand Enqlish Portland 

Cement. 
general agents— national assurance co. of ireland ; 

atla3 assurance co. of london : 
boylston insurance co. of boston. 

H. B Williams. a. Chesebroogh. W. H. Dimond. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & GO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 

Agents for— 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company, i " The Hawaiian Line of Packets," 
Pacific Steam Navigation Company, The China Trade and Insurance Co. 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship | (L'd.), 

Company, | The Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

" The California Line of Clippers," I Steel Rails and Track Material. 

from New York, [ 

Joshua Hendy Machine Works, 

Nos. 39 to 51 FREMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

HYDRAULIC MINING, QUARTZ AND SAWMILL MACHINERY, 
AUTOMATIC ORE FEEDERS, "TRIUMPH" 

ORE CONCENTRATORS, HYDRAULIC GRAVEL ELEVATORS 
HYDRAULIC GIANTS. 

AGENTS FOR THE SALE OP 
'CUMMER" AUTOMATIC ENGINES, 

PORTER M'F'G CO.'S ENGINES AND BOILERS, 
"BAKER" ROTARY PRESSURE BLOWERS, 

"CLIMAX" BAND SAW-MILLS, from Cincinnati Oiiio, 
"WILBRAHAM" ROTARY PISTON PUMPS, 

"BOGGS & CLARKE" CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS, 
P. BLAI3DELL A CO.'S MACHINISTS' TOOLS. 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Agents for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, S. S. Hepworth's Centri 
fugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 
327 Market Street, corner Fremont, 

___^_ SAN FRANOI3QO. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street, : : San Franeiseo. 

Gold and Sliver Refinery and Assay Office. 

ttf Manufacturers of Bluestone, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot and 
The "Standard" Machine-Loaded Shotgun Cartridges, under the 
Chamber/in Patents. 

ARIEL LATHROP, WILLIAM HARNEY, TIMOTHY HOPKINS, 

President. Mgr. and Sec'y. Treasurer. 

GOLDEN 6ATE WOOLEN MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURE 

BLANKETS, CASSIMERES, TWEEDS AND FLANNELS. 
535 Market Street, San Francisco. 



CUNNINGHAM CURTISS, & WELCH, 

WHOLESALE STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS, 

327, 329, 331 SANSOME STREET. 



E. D. JONBB. 



S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 
207 and 209 California Street. 



A. LUSK & CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Packers of the following celebrated brands: 
A. LUSK BEAR BRAND, 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY, 

SAN LORENZO PACKING CO 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



Jan. 4, 1889. 




THERE must be a prospect of lively times in the mining marts 
of Europe, judging from tbe number of experts and promoters 
nocking into this city, on their way to different points. Mexico 
seems to have the call just now, to the exclusion of properties in 
this State. This is not strange, considering the shabby treatment 
foreign capitalists have received during the past three or four 
years. It would only take a few more experts like Hamilton, 
with swindles like the Union Gold, to damn the prospects of Cal- 
ifornia mines abroad for an eternity. The people in London who 
have been salted in this wretched affair are not all powerless to 
resist the injury, and they only await a fair opportunity to get in 
their work with telling effect. It is disagreeable for our mine 
owners to have such failures as the Ilex and Union Gold con- 
stantly brought up in reply to any demand for capital; but they 
must expect it, all the same, unless some steps are taken to guard 
against the evil for the future. It seems too bad that the reputa- 
tion of our most important industry should suffer to benefit one 
or two impecunious schemers. If a few of this class were buried 
by an opportune cave in some of the properties they profess to 
expert, there would be less regret expressed than there is for the 
honest and industrious men who met an untimely death in the 
old Utica shaft at Calaveras. It would only be a righteous retri- 
bution. 

**? 

ANOTHER drawback to an attempt to interest foreign capital 
in mining here, is the unfriendly disposition of the State 
Courts towards the industry. Tbe annual gold yield of California 
now averages about $13,000,000, and has done so for tbe past five 
years. Prior to the decision which interfered so materially with 
hydraulic mining, the output from the gravel mines of the State 
alone amounted to as much, if not more per annum. The reason 
that the output has not fallen off to comparatively nothing, is 
that miners were forced to fall back upon the quartz ledges, 
Their development baa helped to swell the total to an amount 
which is fairly creditable to the State, and which would be nearly 
doubled by the addition of the output from the gravel deposits, 
had not their working been prohibited in certain districts of the 
State. But even quartz mining has its grievances. A recent de- 
cision of the Federal Court places the owners of this class of 
property in a nice fix. Under it possession for years counts for 
nothing, when a question can be raised as to the character of the 
land, be it agricultural or mineral. As the latter it may have 
been taken up and worked at a heavy profit, immense sums spent 
in underground developments and the erection of machinery and 
other forms of surface machinery, yet the mere fact that cabbages 
can be grown on the ground, justifies from a legal standpoint the 
application of the term " agricultural lands," and paves the way 
for litigation against the miners who have held possession for 
years. If this decision holds good, there is not a mine owner in 
Nevada county who has got a leg to stand on. He must either 
waltz up to whoever chooses to slap a railroad title, or agricultural 
patent over one from the United States, and pay through the 
nose for the privilege of being acknowledged the owner of the 
property on which he has already expended a fortune, or get 
kicked out, neck and crop, for bis pains. The devil take such 
law; it is better adapted for Russia than for one of the United 
States of America. 

? * s 

FORTUNATELY the whole of California is not under the ban of 
the Debris law, and a good chance for highly remuerative 
enterprises offers in the northern counties of the State. It seems 
strange that this fact seems to have been ignored by the promot- 
ers of English companies. The owners of vast tracts of gravel are, 
a^s a rule, unable to expend sufficient capital to work on the large 
scale which is absolutely necessary in this branch of mining. 
Trinity and Humboldt counties contain a number of fine proper- 
ties which are a much safer and profitable investment than 
quartz. The year promises well for general mining- The heavy 
fall of rain and snow guarantees a plentiful and continuous sup- 
ply of water which in itself means cheap and effective work- 
A little more attention paid to the development of this mineral 
wealth which has lain idle for years past or been relegated to bands 
of Chinese, would be much more profitable than following the sinu- 
osities of a half-inch vien of quartz through the bowels of the 
earth. 

f 9* 

THERE is little change to report in the Comstock mining mar- 
ket. The depression still continues, and is likely to, unless 
the manipulators conclude to take a hand in the game. If it was 
their desire to kill the business, they could not take a more ef- 
fective method than the present policy of inactivity. The public 
are losing interest in the future of tbe mines, and it may be that 
when it is desired to make a market, more difficulty may be ex- 
perienced than is expected. People soon get tired of tbe same 
old platitudes dished up day after day in the form of prognosti- 
cations about the coming boom. It grows wearisome, more es- 



pecially when the writers are handicapped by manipulators, who 
copper the very information they are so eager to have dissemin- 
ated. Tbe press comes to the assistance of a mine, and attempts 
to drag the stock out of the mire and into the estimation of in- 
vestors, but only partially succeeds when a wad of inside stock 
is thrown on the market, and down goes the price. This seems 
to be the latter-day idea of mining manipulation as carried on in 
California at present, but the biggest fools on the street are the 
men who fancy they can win success by such ridiculous meas- 
ures. Granted, there are fools enough in San Francisco, but they 
don't seem to materialize on Pine street. Five-cent *■ chips," 
with heavy operators perched on the fence, and under-strappers 
pulling the wires for keeps, do not offer star attractions for any 
one short of a ghost of the lobbies or a battered up mud-hen. 
There will have to be some radical change, or when Mr. Lynch 
returns from his researches in the tombs of the Pharaohs, he will 
only be able to lisp in disgust: " Mistah Pwesident, Othello's 
occupwation's gone." 

I 9 9 

WITH the starting up of the Union mill on Commonwealth 
ores, the outlook for Tuscarora mining shares begins to 
brighten. If everything works right, the twenty-stamp mill 
should crush at least thirty-five tons of ore a day, a total monthly 
of over 1,000 tons. The pulp assays are now running between 
$250 and $280 per ton, which should insure a bullion output suffi- 
ciently heavy to convert the most bigoted enemy of tbe camp. 
Coin talks, and a run of dividends will soon bring about a de- 
mand for the shares. The concentrating plant at Grand Prize is 
also running steadily on low grade ores from Commonwealth, the 
assays being about $45 per ton. Ten tons of this ore are reduced 
to one of concentrates, and there are over 20,000 tons of ore to 
run through under the present contract. The other mines in the 
camp are looking very well, particularly the Nevada Queen, North 
Belle Isle, North Commonwealth and Del Monte. Pearson's cats, 
the Navajo Queen and Tuscarora, seem to have died a natural 
death, like his Comstock snares, Phil Sheridan and Trojan. 

if) 

A PROPOSITION is now on foot to reduce the dividends of 
Consolidated California and Virginia to 25 cents per share. 
This should have been done long ago. The present rate of 50 cents 
per share would drag heavily on the most productive property in 
the world, if working expenses were as high as they are at Vir- 
ginia City. Six months out of the year steam is required for the 
mills, and fuel is neither plentiful nor cheap. Then again, tbe ore 
is hoisted hundreds of feet, which involves wear and tear of ma- 
chinery, not to speak of the number of appliances required to 
carry on work at an enormous depth. Considering everything, 
it is a wonder that the mine has done so well as it has, and were 
it not that those in charge understand their business, sh areholders 
would not be able to congratulate themselves on a continuous run 
of dividends. An English mining manager would have been 
closed down or in the hands of the Sheriff months ago. 
99? 

THERE were some distinguished arrivals from Mexico during 
the week, and if some fair madam on Nob Hill, who is lan- 
guishing for a lord of high degree, would be happy and content 
with a meek and lowly descendant of an ancestor who dropped 
his arquebus to be created a belted knight on the field of Agin- 
court, she can have him, bag and baggage, on application at this 
office. The baronetcy has lapsed ages ago, but the landed estates 
are under bond somewhere in Mexico. If not, a girl rating over 
a half-million will be given a guarantee that they will be, before 
the marriage takes place. There is no question, however, about 
the blue texture of the blood. Full and complete documentary 
evidence will be furnished on that point. All communications 
treated with strict confidence. No alloyed metal about an offer 
like this. 

99 9 

A CORRESPONDENT volunteers the information that Del Mar 
is now busily engaged putting in miles of steel pipe at the 
Valley Gold mine, for the purposes of hydraulicking, and wishes 
to know whether we are not surprised to hear it. Nothing would 
be a surprise, coming from that quarter. If this visionary indi- 
vidual suggested a railroad to the moon, or a scheme to exploit 
a gold mine at the bottom of the Atlantic, it would only be ac- 
cepted as fresh evidence of bis astounding genius. Steel flumes 
or any other humbug goes at the Valley Gold, for aught we care, 
and so long as the idiots who hold the shares are content to foot 
the bills. The atmosphere will be clearer when master and man 
in the concern come to the end of their tether. It is only a mat- 
ter of a short time, and meanwhile the local iron works are losing 
no money in supplying the necessary material. 
$ $ $ 

THE following prominent mining men are now due in this city, 
and their names be looked for any day on the registers of the 
leading hotels: Wm. J. Sutherland, of the Candelaria Milling and 
Water Company; J. S. Bennet and C. Wartenwieller, represent a 
syndicate now operating in Mexico; George de a Bouglise, the 
prominent French mining engineer, who is largely interested in 
the productive mines at Red Point, Placer county. 



Jan. t, SSSO 



SAN KKANOISm NKWS LETTER. 



15 




'iloir the Crier!" "What the devil art thou.' 
"One thai will play the devil, sir. with vou." 



HE was a sad-looking man. He was riding in the Clay street 
cars with a very jovial companion, who was striving to cheer 
him up. The sad one said: » I've had a rough week of it. On 
Monday, Annie, who was beginning with the whooping cough — 
she's nineteen months old — choked; she turned black in the face 
and stiffened herself out. Eleven o'clock at night this was. I 
got up in my nightgown, slipped on my pants and boots, and 
rushed off for a doctor? He relieved her a little. I sat up with 
her all night. You know how ray wife is. Any night I may 
have to go for the nurse and doctor. Then I went off to work in 
the morning. Tuesday night baby was sick as night before; 
didn't close my eyes all night. Wednesday, fell asleep over ray 
work, and the fellows said, ■ I bad been out on a spree.' I owned 
up; said I had been on a little tear the night before, and laughed 
the matter off. While I was down town ray wife gave Harry, 
my eldest, nine years old, a bath, a thing I was always opposed 
to. Then, when the cold wind in the evening came in, he caught 
cold. Just as hearty as a child could be day before, playing circus 
in the yard, and getting up bull fights with a rocking-horse and 
two cats tied to chairs. I tell you he was mighty sick on Wednes- 
day. I went off to the doctor again, and he said it might be fever, 
and he rather thought it would lead to congestion of the brain. 
Thank God! the boy's better now, and I don't care what the doctor 
thought. The next day, Maud, she's three years old, strayed 
down town, and I had to go and look for her when I came home 
from work. Yesterday I tried to get a little sleep, but some old 
friends came in to make a call, and I had to entertain them. I 
tell you, Jack, I've had a pretty rough week of it; but if I don't 
have to get up in the middle of to-night to go for a doctor, I shall 
be thankful." He ceased, and then I, who believe women are 
not well treated, was willing to confess that men are not such 
brutes, after all. 

HAVE the dark ages returned? Or what is the matter with 
our city and its population? In one of our leading dailies 
there are no less than thirteen advertisements of clairvoyants, 
astrologers, etc. Eleven of these are women, while the other two 
prefix Dr. to their names. Now, the question naturally arises, 
who supports these impostors? For some one must- do it, or else 
they would never be able to advertise, and live in the style most 
of them do. Can it be possible that in this, one of the most en- 
lightened cities in the world, and in the nineteenth century, that 
so many credulous fools can be found? I do not believe that any 
other city, either in the United States or Europe, supports more 
impostors, idle bummers, and worthless humanity generally, than 
the comparatively small city of San Francisco. In European 
cities such frauds as these clairvoyants, astrologers, etc., un- 
doubtedly are, would not be allowed to exercise their nefarious 
calling; which is simply obtaining money under false pretenses. 
The newly-arrived Biddy, and the unsophisticated Pike country- 
man, are usually their victims. The more ignorant a person is, 
the more superstitious. But our laws should protect, especially 
those who, on account of deficient education or other causes, are 
susceptible to the influence of these vultures. I have no hesita- 
tion in saying that the fact of the existence of so many clair- 
voyants, etc., in this city, is a disgrace to our civilization, our 
laws and citizens. 

AN unfortunate Celestial was arrested a few days ago for having 
in his possession " some tobacco of which he could not -give 
a satisfactory account." Now, I would like to know how many 
young men on Kearny street on a fine afternoon could give a sat- 
isfactory account of the tobacco in their possession ? How many 
would have to confess that the cigars they so complacently puffed 
had been ravished from the case or vest pocket of a weak-minded 
friend — had been acquired by the searching question, "How 
many more have you of the same sort?" had been captured by 
the stand-and-deliver cry, " Give us a weed, old boy!" had been 
requisitioned from the open cigar-box of the well-to-do acquaint- 
ance, or borne in triumph from under the nose of the astonished 
cigar-dealer as the echo of the request, » Chalk it down to me," 
died away among the piles of empty boxes at his back ? How 
many who defiled the sidewalk with a mouthful of the nauseating 
leaf could truthfully affirm that the glittering lead paper from 
which it had been taken rested at that moment in their own rear 
pocket? Echo answers, "How many?" Yet a Celestial is re- 
quired to give a satisfactory account to a policeman or be shoved 
in the Broadway House of Temporary Retirement. 

IF the "kind, jolly, if a trifle indiscreet, lady, whose husband 
has just inherited a large fortune," would pay her numerous 
due bills given for money, to be paid when this fortune was in- 
herited by her husband, it would be far more to her credit than 
sending pictures set in silver frames to favorite members of the 
Pacific Union Club. 



A BOW and a smile and a simper, 
A health in a glass of sherry, 
A cake and a crust and a bonbon, 

A murmur of "happy" and "merry." 

Some chit-chat of stocks and of socials, 

The last song, the last scandal, and maybe 

If a family friend, a few presents 

For papa, and mamma and baby. 

Night comes, and the voice, which at morning 
Was tuned to the proper inflection, 

Is now a half hiccough, half stammer, 

While the eyes won't bear careful inspection. 

In the dawning a headache, a heartache, 
With, "How do I hear, I wonder?" 

A bilious remorse and a groan of 

" I was never so tipsy, by thunder!" 

In garments the last and the rarest, 
With curls the darkest or fairest, 

Society's charmer prepared is 

In smiles and small talk for the day. 

Her voice gushes delicate phrases 

And her sweet eyes she casts down and raises 
As she leads through the flirtation's soft mazes 

The beaux who their compliments pay. 

She never grows languid or weary, 
No matter how prosy or dreary, 
No matter how seedy or beery 

Tne worshipers kneel at the shrine. 

Her arm, so dear in its bareness, 
Adored for its dimples and fairness, 
As when poised over goblet she hears hira — 
" Many thanks, but no water in mine." 

And at night when the darkness is 'round her, 
When the god of soft dreamings has found her, 
And in warm, tender visions has bound her. 
Of one caller the dearest and best. 

One happy king, rich in possession, 
Blessed in hearing that whispered confession 
Which followed his glowing profession, 
That he reigned the lord of that breast. 

LAST Sunday I saw two menland a boy blazing away on the lit- 
tle lake close to the new Marine Hospital. One man was on 
shore, the other and boy in a boat. The man on shore kept firing 
away, always shooting right in the middle of the flock of coots, 
which, as tame as domestic ducks, quietly swam around. He 
succeeded in wounding a few, but did not kill any while we 
watched him. The boy was more unfortunate still, as his gun 
would not go off. Cap after cap he snapped at the poor tame 
coots, but fortunately for the confiding birds, the gun refused to 
be a party to such a dirty and unsportsmanlike piece of murder. 
There were some people standing on the shore, who evidently 
felt as we did about it, as they greeted every miss fire with de- 
riding shouts. No doubt the authorities are not aware of the fact 
that the men employed about the hospital building indulge in this 
4 cowardly sport. If they are cognizant of the fact and do not stop 
it, they are like the men who wound and murder these harmless 
birds; no sportsmen, and poor hearted men. 

' £ T^HE man who duns " will have a hard time in the future to 
1 find the dunnee at home, if an invention now under con- 
sideration in this city is brought to a satisfactory completion. It 
consists of a number of mirrors, placed at distances regulated by 
the size of the hall of the dunnee and the distance of his favorite 
sitting-room from the doorway. The first mirror is placed imme- 
diately inside the hall door. The servant is instructed to let the 
dun stand in the hall while he inquires if the family is at home. 
Dun naturally looks in the mirror to see if his cravat is all right, 
and the reflection of his intelligent features is flashed from mirror 
to mirror until it reaches the impecunious one, who recognizes it 
as the gas man or the water man, or the newspaper man, or the 
coal and wood man, or some of the other men in whose books his 
name lays inscribed. Then is the waiting dun informed by an in- 
telligent Chinaman that the family is not at home, and he departs 
with little thoughts of appealing to the laws of his country in his 
heart. 

CAPTAIN SWASEY, the pioneer, notary and litterateur, has in- 
curred the animosity of a big tomcat, who has quarters where 
the Captain holds his office. This remarkable feline, only a few 
days ago, selected Captain Swasey's bust of Shakespeare from all 
the bric-a-brac in the office, and befouled the Bard of Avon in a 
shocking manner. When the Captain was taking an affidavit 
from a wealthy client, the Tom plunged his claws in a tender part 
of the gentleman's anatomy, and drove him shrieking to the 
street. The only explanation of this vendetta is that the cat 
came here in the spring of '50, and has been unable to appreciate 
the Captain in his reminiscences of early California. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 4, 1889. 




5UNLCAMS 




TRAMP (a( kitchen door) — That cake smells temptin'. Cook— It's 
some the cookin' school young leddies made— twin ty things mixed 
wid forty things. " I wish I had some." " Wull.Oi'll give ye a piece 
if ye'll ate it outdours. Oi don't want ye to die in th' house." 

— New York Weekly. 

Eyes tell of love, it needs no voice; 
And when the maiden of your choice 

Invites to soft advances, 
If you should ask for a caress 
She won't think much of you unless 
You understand her "no" as "yes;" 
For thus the thrilling happiness 

Of yielding she enhances.— Lippincotfs Magazine. 

The Minister— What a pleasure to be good! Are you good, 

Tommy? Tommy— No, not very ; but I'm goin' to turn over a new 
leaf soon as I lick that Thompson kid. Business before pleasure — 
that's my motto. — Munsey's Weekly. 

At the Ballet {little girl, fearfully) — Mamma, when are the In- 
dians coming on? Mother— Hush, dear; there are no Indians. JAltle 
Girl— Then who scalped all the men in the front seats? 

— New York Sun. 
" Don't get in the soup," my friend wrote me, 
In a very kindly spirit; 
But I wrote back in royal glee, 
His advice was fain to jeer it. 

" I'm in the soup, and a better time 
Since the day I left my cradle 
I've never had," I said — it's prime! 
For I'm in the soup with a ladle.'' 

""Where do all the pins go? "asks a contemporary. That isn't 
the queston that bothers the man who patters around in his bare feet 
to fix the fire for the night. What he would like to know is where all 
tbe pins come from. — Burlington Free Press. 

The Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in Swit- 
zerland has resolved to banish cats from the country, on the ground 
that they are killing off the birds. Next, they will want to get rid of 
the birds because they kill the worms. —Peck's Sun. 

My clearest girl, 1 beg you'll not 

Begin your sentences "Oh, say!" 
Eschew likewise " the soup," "Great Scott!" 
For slang, my love, is not au fait. 

— Carlyte Smith. 
" Oh, Edward, why are you so late? I have been so fright- 
ened." Edward {who has " taken in" champagne supper)— 'Portant 
bisnish, m' dear. "Wouldn't, it keep till to-morrow?" "No,love; 
not after corksh drawn." 

Visitor— I suppose your daughter is busily engaged preparing 

for her wedding? Mother — Yes; she is up in her room now, destroy- 
ing all her old letters. 

Is murder going on near by? 

Do Greeks again sack Troy? 
What means this thrilling, curdling cry? 

They're washing baby boy. —Detroit Critic. 

"I thought the President only appointed first-class post- 

masters." "So he does." " Then who the deuce appointed Wana- 4 
maker?" —Life. 

Van Riper— Say, Featherwate, you remind me of a celebrated 

man. Featherwate (pleased)— No; wtioni? " Oliver Cromwell— same 
wart exactly." —Time. 

First Politician— Is there really a future state? Second Politic- 
ian— A future state? Why, there are four of them. Haven't you 
read the election news? — Puck. 

Berlin, says an item, has 38,000 dogs. If the old saying, every 

dog has its day, holds good in Berlin, it must take over 104 years for 
each dog's vacation to come around again. —Peck's Sun. 

Muldoon—I say, McCarthy, did you vote wid yer party? 

McCarthy— Did 1 vote wid me party ? Seven times. 

— Saturday Evening Herald. 

The play was bad, the players worse, 

And, tired of the hisses and jeers, 
The kerosene lamps and the gas went out, 
And the seats rows up in tiers. 

— Cleveland Town Topics. 

Young Mother— Don't you think babv looks like his father? 

Visitor— Ye-ea, but I wouldn't worry; he may outgrow it. 

— Texas Sif tings. 
The King of Siam is said to wear $1,000,000 worth of jewels. 
What a hotel clerk he would make! — Boston Bulletin. 

The Parsees, as a rule, are most particular about their head-gear, 
and are as careful in their make-up as the Coreans, who wear the 
most comical hats. If White, the Hatter, of G14 Commercial street, 
were in the countries inhabited by either of these people, he would 
occupy the same position in these nations as he does here, which is 
that of the leading hatter. 

For Japanese curios which are truly artistic, go to Marsh & Co., 
under the Palace Hotel. 



izr>rsTT:R.-A_:r>ro:E_ 



Exhibit October 1st, 1889. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

216 Sansome Street 

Losses p'd since organ! 'n.$3, 011,925. 77 I Reinsurance Reserve . I 255,052.20 

Assets October 1, 1889 815,748.87 Capital paid up, Gold . . . 300,000 00 

Surplus for policy holders 801,954.83 ( 

Nbt Surplus, over capital and all liabilities, October 1, 1889 246,902.62 

Fire Losses paid in 1889 $159,086.70 

Fire Losses unpaid October l, 1889 11,794.04 

President J. F. HOUGHTON 1 Secretary CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-President. . ..J. L. N. SHEPARD | General Agent R. H. M AGILL 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

fIBB __ — IMZ-A-IRXISriE. 

CAPITAL, Paid In Full % 200.000.00 

ASSETS, December 31, 1888 460,086.70 

LOSSES Paid Since Organization 2, 101,032. 71 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 
Chas. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(Safe Deposit Building). Ban Francisco, Cal. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF HAMBUR6. 

Capital $1,600,000.00 

Net Surplus 408,400.27 

Assets January 1, 1889 1,311,809.84 

Invested in U. S 518,862.98 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 
232 California Street, - - San Francisco, Cal. 

MB~ General Agents for the United States and Territories west of the 
Rocky Mountains. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Reserve Fund (In addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 8,124,067.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

306 California Street. San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. B ALOISE of Basle— Capital 5,000,000 Francs. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable In all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street, 8an Francisco . 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital S9.260.000 

Cash Assets 2,764,876 

Cash Assets In United States 1,398,646 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS, 

316 California Street, San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782.] 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.1 

BUTLER & HALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Paeifie Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class Companies, or Grain sold, if 
desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company. 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 

100 Per Cent. Dividend Guaranteed 

—BY THE 

MANHATTAN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW YORK. 

If you will send your age and address, we will cheerfully return you our 
Rates, and Results of our NEW PLAN. It will impose No Obligation. 

Manhattan Life Insurance Company of New York. 

Cash Assets, January 1, 1889 $11,643,048.80 

JOHN LANDERS^ General Agent, 

240 Montgomery St., S. E. corner Pine St., Rooms 1 and 2, San Francisco. 



Jan. -1 1889 



SAN FRANCISCO MOWS LETTER. 



17 



■•$ 



- jn 



DUELING Ibe month em. int.* November 80, tliere was a decrease 
in ihe total national bank circulation of $2,375,328. The tie 
crease f-»r the twelve months ending on that date was $3(5,705,0(55. 
The total amount outstanding «>n November 30, 1880, amounted 
to 9199,491,486. Of the total circulation the portion based on 
United States bonds amounted to $120,388,116, adecrease of $810,- 
169 f<»r the month and of $20,099,257 for the year. The portion of 
the circulation secured by money on deposit with the Treasurer 
amounted to $70,103,310, a decrease of $1,55(5,150 for the month 
and of $10.6(56,708 for the twelve months. The United States 
In. rids on deposit to secure circulating notes as above amounted 
to $144,70«t,250, a decrease of $958,000 for the month. There was, 
however, an increase in other kinds of circulation during the 
month, and the total circulation of all kinds amounted on Decem- 
ber 1 to $1,417,533,635, an increase of over $12,500,000 since Octo- 
ber 1. 

The great " bore " at Scbladebach has now reached a depth 

of 1,748 metres. Numerous scientific observations concerning the 
temperature of the earth's crust have been made. At a depth of 
1.710 metres the thermometer indicated 56.6 degrees cent. Dur- 
ing the progress of the boring it was found that the temperature 
increased 1 degree cent, for every 35 metres. At this rate the 
point, where the interior of the earth is supposed to be in a state 
of liquefaction — say at about 2,000 degrees cent. — would only be 
reached at a depth of 71,000 metres, equal to 9& geographical 
miles. So we are not likely to get into " liquidation " as soon as 
some philosophers predict. 

A new resinous soldering flux (patented) has recently been 

brought out by Mr. J. N. Watkins, of Eccles, Manchester. The 
flux is a liquid, about the consistency of thin varnish. As it con- 
tains no alkali or acid, either free or combined, no corroding effects 
whatever are produced by its use. With the new flux the solder 
will flow {as we have verified by experiment) with great freedom — 
a point which is ot the greatest inportance. For telegraph and 
electric light work the liquid must prove very valuable. — Electri- 
cal Review. 

The water-lily is said to be largely used in some parts of India 

as a foodstuff. The fruit of one species that grows plentifully in 
the lakes of Cashmere is rich in starch, and has much the flavor 
of a chestnut. If the nuts are dried they will keep for a long 
time, and, when ground, may be made into cakes or porridge, or 
they may be soaked for some hours and then boiled. The seeds 
of the lotus are also much used in India. When green they are 
eaten raw; when ripe they are boiled. The root, too, is often 
boiled and served as a vegetable. 

The orders for the four monster battle-ships intended to be 

constructed for the British Royal Navy, have been lately given to 
three firms. These vessels are expected to take three and a-half 
years in building and will be the largest men-of-war ever con- 
structed in England, the displacement being 14,150 tons, or 
2,000 tons more than the largest ships now on the list of the Brit- 
ish Navy — the Nile and Trafalgar. 

The Barberton Times announces the discovery of quicksilver 

in South Africa. The new and valuable find is situated below the 
Big Buffalo (De Kaap) gold mines, in Lebombo. It is showing it- 
self to be marvelously rich in places, so much so that free quick- 
silver is even found. Samples worked average at the rate of one 
ounce of pure quicksilver from a little over four pounds of rock. 

The projected construction of a canal starting direct from 

Vienna to connect the Danube with the Oder, receives the fullest 
encouragement of the Government. It would be a great gain for 
commerce, and assist travelers if some smart steam-boats were 
run upon its waters. 

Maine boasts a wonderful pair of trowsers among its re- 
markable products, the dimensions being: Waist, 4 feet 8 inches; 
inside of leg, 2 feet one inch ; size of knee, 28 inches ; whole length 
of pants, 3 feet 6 inches. 

The Bordeaux vintage of the present year is said to be gener- 

erally satisfactory, both as regards quantity and quality. An ex- 
hibition of led wines will shortly be held in the town of Bordeaux. 

One of the latest applications of electricity is the making of 

a floor mat that throws out heat — an electric heater, in fact, in 
the form of a mat. An excellent device for warming the toes. 



i^srsTTE-^isrcE. 



When a man has dined well, he can be easily approached for a 
favor. A good dinner puts a man in an excellent humor, and makes 
him feel at peace with all the world. That is why the habitues of the 
Original Swain's Bakery, at 213 Sutter street, always wear smiling 
faces, and always look sleek and contented. 



The Methodist missionary is a man who would generally rather 
preach than eat, but there does not live a preacher in these United 
States who would not drink a cocktail or glass of wine at the Grand 
Central Wine Rooms, 16-18 Third street, rather than preach a funeral 
sermon over the carcass of his departed mother-in-law. 




Insurance Company, 
capital $1,000,000, | assets 

D. J. 8TAPLES, President. 
ALPHEUS BULL, Vice President. 



$2,360,000. 



I WILLIAM J. DUTTON, Secretary. 
| B. FAYMONVILLE, Ass't Secretary. 



Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United States. 

The Largest Assets of any Company West of New York State. 



Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation 

OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
Office, 315 Montgomery Street and 410 Fine Street. 



CAPITAL (Fully Paid) $2,000,000 

ASSETS 2,672,849 

wJPSrfiS^T-;^ •••-Presidentl Z. P. CLARK Secretary 

WM. MACDONALD...Vice-President | J. B. LEVISON... .Marine Secretary 

"IhTstate investment and insurance company 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up $400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 218 AND 220 SANSOME STREET, 

San Fr-aneiseo, California. 
GEOKGE L. BRANDER, CHAS. H. CUSHING, P. J. WHITE 

President. Secretary. Vice-President. 

Board of Directors— D. Callaghan, P. J. White, J. M. Donahue, GEO. 

L. Brander, E. L. Goldstein, L. Cunningham, M. Kane, Fisher Ames, Dr. 

C. P. Buckley, Dr. Wm. Jones, G. H. Wheaton, T. McMuUin, H. H. Watson. 

H. Dimond, P. Bola ' 



THE SOUTH BRITISH 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. 

CAPITAL St 0.000.U00. 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 
Office— 412 California Street, San Francisco. 

A. S. MTJBBAY, Manager. 
SAN FRANCISCO CITY DEPARTMENT: 
CONRAD & MAXWELL, Agent 
421 California Street. 

CALIFORNIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Organized February, 1861. 

CashCapital j 600,000 00 

Assets 1,300,000 00 

Net Surplus as regards Policyholders 820,000 00 

Losses Paid 3,500,000 00 

CITY DEPARTMENT: 

A. C. DONNELL, Manager, 

378 Californ ia Street, S. F. 

Department of the Pacific States and Territories. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL J10,000,000. | CASH ASSETS IN U. 8.... 1746,186.00 

SCOTTISH UNION AND NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

CAPITAL - 530,000,000 | CASH ASSETS $16,407,072.46 

420 California Street, San Francisco, Cat. 
W. J. CALLXNGHAM.. General Agent 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL ?6,000,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 California Street, San Francisco. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, $46,000,000- 

London Assurance Corporation of London [Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Company of London [Established 1836. ' 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1867.] 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 
S. E. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets. Safe Deposit Building. 

HENRY C. HYDE, 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 
MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 

Of Handwriting, Inks, Papers, etc., in the Detection of Forgeries, 

Counterfeits and Imitations. 

41 IS CALIFORNIA STREET. San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 4, 1889. 



TO any one who has watched the course of events during the 
past year, and who is familiar with their present condition, it 
must be apparent that a great change in real estate matters has 
taken place. The fact which attracts the greatest attention is the 
enormous increase in the number of people who have become 
property owners. Blocks and tracts of land have been subdivided 
with uniform success during the past year, and as a speculation 
or as an investment real estate has been favored as never before. 
People of moderate means have turned into the channel of trade 
and business through real estate purchases a very large amount 
of money, which heretofore went into savings banks, and often 
into mining stocks, never to return. The monthly average of 
sales of real estate has been about three millions of dollars. Much 
property, which for years has been unsalable, has changed hands 
again for the first time since the depression occurring early in the 
seventies. The city has grown apace in the matter of improve- 
ments, for with very few exceptions the builder has followed the 
real estate agent. Nor must it be overlooked that these things 
were done not by reason of any extraordinary influx of people to 
San Francisco, or with capital transferred from older communities, 
but almost wholly by the people and with the means which have 
been at our command for some time past. And considering, 
therefore, the millions of money which, instead of being hoarded, 
were invested in the purchase of lots while yet they were cheap 
and within reach, as well as the millions which were used to 
build homes, and also the sums, perhaps another million or two, 
exacted by municipal authority for the improvement of streets, 
while at the same time the amount of wages earned has not in- 
creased, it is clear that the general public has not to-day as much 
ready cash under its control as it had a year ago. Unquestion- 
ably, much money must have become concentrated in the hands 
of those who invested years ago and have sold at a profit, and it 
is therefore but natural that there is a suggestion of money be- 
coming scarce, and that the collection of taxes at the rate of about 
thirty-three per cent, of the income of property is being felt by 
many who hitherto, by reason of the manner in which their 
capital was held, either escaped taxation altogether or were taxed 
indirectly only. 

There is not much money among the people, a fact which the 
powers that be (for a short while) should bear in mind while 
planning new enterprises and improvements to be paid for by 
men of small means and incomes. They should remember that 
" land poverty " is very prevalent just now. The movements of 
all markets are often like those of a pendulum, and having swung 
in the direction of the greatest expansion, they invariably react 
in the direction of contraction whenever the forward movement 
is stopped. Should it happen, therefore, that the recent buyers of 
land find themselves unable to hold on to their new acquisitions, 
by reason of two heavy burdens laid upon them, the general 
market is apt to experience a backset, much to be regretted, be- 
cause unnecessary. Improvements are always good and profitable 
to the land, but by no means always so to the owners of the land, 
and they are entitled to much consideration. 

Unquestionably the course of the market has been very satis 
factory during the year 1889. The business has been a prosper 
ing and a paying one throughout. There were many heavy 
transactions, but by far the most satisfaction was derived from 
sharp demand for cheap homestead lots. Prices rose steadily 
and are rising still, the demand continuing. The only thing re- 
tarding free trading was the constant increase in the demands of 
sellers, numerous sales coming to nothing because the owners 
suddenly changed their minds as to the value of the possessions 
with which they were about to part. The y€ar therefore closed 
upon a very firm and steady market. And 1890 promises fully 
as well. There is little danger that the market will not be able 
to maintain its present rate of progress, while the indications are 
that the start recently made in the district north of Market street 
will extend all the way to North Beach and result in a general' 
movement. In no other portion of the city are there so many 
opportunities for investment bargains. 

The past week, as might well be expected, was barren of news 
or events. Few sales of note or interest were reported. Among 
these there may be noted, however, 60x90 on the southeast corner 
of Front and Oregon streets, another purchase by the so far 
undiscovered investor or investors who have taken such a sud- 
den liking to that part of the city. Other sales were 45:10x137:6 
on the north side of Howard street; 45:10 east of Beale? 
99x87:6 on the southeast corner of Lombard and Powell 
streets; 65x115 on the southeast corner of Twenty-fifth and Mis- 
sion streets; 89x102 with an L of 11 x 44 on the northwest corner 
of Valencia and Sixteenth streets, $2 1,000; 30x122:6 on the east side 
of Mission street 155 feet south of Twentieth; 1376:xl37:6 on the 
north side of Hayes street; 137:6 east of Lyon; 1,000x112:6 on 
the southwest corner of Pierce and Vallejo streets, $7,750; and 
55x137:6 on the south side of Pacific street 165 feet west of Brod- 
erick. 



Dealings in South San Francisco and Potrero property have 
been seriously interfered with during the greater portion of the 
old year by the cloud cast upon the property by a concern oper- 
ating under the protection of the corporation law as the Pacific 
Land Association. The men who compose it seem to be ashamed 
to disclose their identity. This association pretends to hold title 
to the greater portion of the southern territory. It is the claim 
which for years was known as the Tripp claim, being discovered 
and nursed into life by a worthy of that name. The association, 
so far, has been worsted in every attempt to get the real holders 
of the land properly into court, its latest defeat occurring but a 
few weeks ago before Judge Hunt. Nevertheless, the title of the 
land involved remains clouded, and that is all that the people de- 
sire. Several large property-owners, tired of litigation, and, for 
the purpose of being rid of the annoyance, have been induced to 
settle with the speculators. Thus, among others, George Hearst, 
rather than fight, is said to have dropped several thousand dollars 
with them. The Reiss Bros, settled at the rate of five dollars a 
lot, paying in all about $2,500, the land thus cleared being worth 
several hundred times that sum. Of course it is plain that if the 
association really thought themselves possessed of a good title 
they would not settle for such a ridiculous amount. Now, there 
ought to be a very simple and efficacious remedy for this kind of 
business. Our statute permitting incorporation was not enacted 
for such a purpose, and as that statute not only permits, but 
makes it the duty of, the Attorney-General to inspect and exer- 
cise control over corporations, it might be very advisable if the 
people thus forced into lining the pockets of a handful of rascals 
with money were to call his attention to this case, with the view 
of having him take proper proceedings towards the dissolution 
and forfeiture of the corporate existence and property claims of 
this title-clouding corporation. This kind of business ought not 
to be permitted to flourish any longer. 

Poison-oak cured by Steele's GrindeliaLotion. Twenty years' experience 
Las proved this remedy to be a,speciflc. Apply immediately after returning 
from a picnic excursion, and the dread eruption will be prevented. James 
G. Steele & Co. . 635 Market street. 




" Well, Mary, here id a ll-vpj' New Year to you, and many of 
them; and may you always be as beautiful as you are now." 

" The same to you, James; and how can I help being beautiful, as 
long as I drink J. F. Cutter's fine Old Bourbon, for sale by E. Martin 
& Co., 40S Front street, the sole agents." 

Til! PLUG CUT, 

Made from the best selections of three 
year old Virginia leaf. Those who 
smoke it find it a very mild, sweet and 
mellow smoke. Manufactured by 
Myers Bros. & Co., Richmond, Va. 



Jan. 4. 1889. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER. 



19 



THE BOURSE AND UNDERWRITER. 

California Stkfkt. January 4, isoo, 

THE latest aansation in underwriting circles is the rupture »>f 
the groat triple combine. The Royal ami Norwich Onion have 
agreed to disagree with the Lancashire, and that well-known com- 
pany will soon be in other hands. The question of the hour is — 
In whose hands? No one seems to know exactly the reason 
of the Lancashire's withdrawal. The triple policy was as well 
known throughout the Coast as the Liverpool A London A Globe, 
and it was a very strong card to draw business with. Manager 
Carpenter is acquainted with everything pertaining to good under- 
writing, and is among the most experienced in the calling on the 
Coast Of course numberless rumors are in circulation; a thou- 
sand and one causes are assigned by friends and enemies to ex- 
plain the break, but there the matter ends. No reliable informa- 
tion is obtainable. However, the tale finding most favor says 
that the three companies differed on the subject of the Pacific In- 
surance Cnion. The first two were not disposed to approve the 
workings of the organization, while the third, though by no means 
enthusiastic, was not disposed to assume the position of "kicker." 
The relations between the agency and the Union have never been 
particularly cordial, and a break has several times been imminent. 
But some one's good office always restored equanimity just in 
time to avoid so disagreeable a contingency. The Combination 
has always been pretty independent, but is conservative, and 
does nothing without deep thought. Had it not been for the 
Lancashire's refusal to participate, it is thought that Carpenter 
would have been heard from very emphatically on certain events 
of the past six months. In consequence, there was a consulta- 
tion at headquarters, and the withdrawal of the Lancashire is the 
result. The Royal and Norwich Union will continue as before 
under Manager Carpenter, while the third will seek pastures 
new. The agency is worth a good deal. The company is well 
known, its assets are large, and the security it offers is unim- 
peachable. It would be an addition to any agency on the Coast. 
Rumor has had it in half a dozen offices; among others, in W. 
Greer Harrison's, Anglo-Nevada, Dornin's, Spencer's, and half a 
dozen more. Nothing will be known until after the arrival of 
General Agent Litchfield, whose duty it will be to bestow the 
plum. It is safe to believe that he will learn more about the back 
history of the profession inside of three days, than years of resi- 
dence here would have given him. 

Oakland is making itself felt in a lively manner. Affairs are 
seriously disturbed over there, and all sorts of conditions of diffi- 
culties are threatened. In the California Athens no one pretends 
to maintain the P. I. U. tariff. The document is occasionally re- 
ferred to, but as for quoting from it, it is not thought of. Compe- 
tition has been very brisk for the multitude of residence risks in 
which the city's bed chamber abounds. The Home Mutual writes 
many, and so does the Oakland Home. What these two left has 
been bitterly fought for. Complaints have been very numerous, 
so finally, last week, Manager Stillman, of the Compact, jour- 
neyed across the bay and endeavored to induce the local agents 
to amend their ways. But they all refused. He asked them to 
sign an agreement not to cut rates, and instead of complying they 
derided the attempt and in very plain English told the manager 
to amend the city business before attempting so Herculean a task 
as that of bringing Oakland into line. The San Francisco locals, 
the Oakland men say, are responsible for nine-tenths of the de- 
moralization, in order to heighten the general confusion Mr. 
Craig has again broken loose, contrary to all understanding and 
agreement he has employed a salaried agent and solicitor to work 
up business in Oakland and Alameda. The Union has expostu- 
lated, but Mr. Craig, who is never really happy unless listening 
to himself talk or making trouble, has refused to make other 
arrangements. As a matter of course the Auckland office will be 
communicated with and Mr. Craig's conduct fully made known 
to the directors. There appears but little sense or reason in the 
adoption of a policy of gratuitous obstruction; while pretending 
loyalty and allegiance to the Compact this agent violates all con- 
ditions and pledges, and actually proceeds with a course of action 
diametrically opposed to the dictates of the organization. The 
result of Mr. Stillman's talk with the Oaklanders was an order 
announcing a reduction to ten per cent, of the tariff for Alameda 
county. This created no small amount of excitement and a 
special meeting of the Union was the result. Here there was a 
great deal of talking, and finally it was agreed to suspend the 
execution of the previous order for ten days. This is the present 
status of affairs. 

Among other changes of the New Year is that of the West- 
chester, whose agency has been held by Arthur Donnell, of the 
California. It has been determined to make a separate depart- 
ment for the Pacific Coast, and an office has been opened in the 
basement of the Fireman's Fund building on Sansome street. Mr. 
Donnell, while still retaining the city agency of the California, 
has gone into partnership with Charles Okell, who has secured 
tne agency of the Peoples, and several others. They ought to do 
well, and build up an excellent business. 

W. S. Duval, who has done such excellent work for the Union 
in the way of improving the water supplies and the Fire Depart- 
ments of the Coast, has decided to leave the Union, and to go into 



Balfour and Guthrie's with Mr. Spencer. There are few more thor- 
oughly qualified underwriters than Mr. Duval on this Coast, and 
his energy, capacity and large acquaintance ought to assure him 
plenty of business. 

The Jacobs and Baston agency is now located at 312 Pine street, 
in the premises lately occupied by the Bank of British North 
America, which has got on to Sansome street with the rest of the 
big banks. The city department will be on the ground floor, 
while upstairs the country department will be located over the 
latter. Mr. E. E. Farnsworth will preside. The firm of Easton, 
Jacobs, Brown and Farnsworth is a strong one, and very hard to 
get ahead of on a question of business. 

Armstrong has not yet succeeded in inducing capitalists to re- 
pair the impairment of the Armstrong Fire Insurance Company 
of New York. The New York Commissioner has made an ex- 
amination of the Company's assets, and has ordered its with- 
drawal until the capital is brought back again to the required 
standard. Insurance Commissioner Wadsworth has followed 
suit, and announces the impairment of both this Company and 
the Long Island. The latter corporation will probably make good 
its deficiency and recommence business. Its impairment was 
the result of the Boston fire. 

There is no truth in the rumor that the Union intends levying 
an assessment on its stockholders. Though the year has been by 
no means prosperous, the business of the preceding twelve months 
enabled the accumulation of a handsome surplus. This will tide 
the Company over. This year the Union's business will be im- 
mense. Its 1889 premiums are far ahead of all previous years. 

The locals are all coming out better than they thought. The 
Anglo will have a surplus of between sixty and one hundred 
thousand, the Fireman's Fund with a slightly decreased surplus, 
the Union and the State Investment about even. After such a 
terrific year, these Companies have good reason to congratulate 
themselves on having passed through the fiery ordeal so well. It 
certainly speaks well for their stability and resource. 

Secretary. 

THE DELBECK CHAMPAGNES! 



THE EXTRA DRY, 

THE PERFECTION OF A DRY WINE. 





TIE U BRUT, 

The highest grade of Champagne without 
sweetness. 



THE BARTON & GUESTIER 

(Established 1725, Bordeaux) 

Clarets, White Wines and Olive Oil. 




JAMES DE FREMERY & CO., - San Francisco. 

General Agents, Pacific coast. 



ARCHITECTURE. 



AU43VSTUS IiAVEK (leaver, Mullany A leaver) having returned 
from Europe, has resumed the practice of his profession. 

Offices, 93 Flood Bail ding, corner of Market and Fourth St*.. 
Sau Fraucisco. 



20 


SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. Jan. 4, 1889. 


EARLY 


FRISCO REMINTSCENCTS.— LXSDI. THE CAPTAINS CAP. 



[Bt as Olp TotKfi.] 

AXD now I think that these reminiscences may be brought to a 
close. Begun, as they were, with the dual intent of recalling 
old times to old timers and informinz new comers of what the old 
days were like, it was proposed to include only the very distant 
past. But insensibly the following years have come forward, in 
the mind, to claim attention and crave record, until the original 
limits of my contributions have been overstepped, perhaps some 
will think, beyond a point when memories are interesting. If so. 

I can only beg the kind indulgence of the '.' . sti - readers, 

and make my excuse a desire to do what seemed most for their 
amusement and edification. Before saying good-bye, however, 
there is one recollection, inadvertently overlooked in its proper 
place, which should have admittance. 

I feel that these reminiscences of early days and of the times 
whose memories are so dear to most of us, would indeed be in- 
complete without at the least a passing reference to the News Let- 
ter itself, and its growth from a single page, printed on a sheet of 
letter paper, to the handsome weekly volame it has become. I 
well remember c^y father buying it to send East away back in 
I ■''- It used to be for sale, I recollect, at a news stand on Mont- 
gomery street, between Clay and Merchant, east side, and also at 
G. W. Bell's, corner of Montgomery and Merchant. It was then 
a veritable news letter, and in its two or three columns of cleverly 
selected news, showed the clear and discriminating judgment of 
the master band -whose indomitable will, untiring energy, and 
bright mind carried it through many " days that tried men's 
souls " to an established success. 

* * » 

Indeed, I never remember a time that the Xew? Letter was not 
eagerly sought, eagerly bought and eagerly read. It was always 
so sharp and crisp, so light and airy, that its perusal partook a 
good deal of the character of a Saturday glass of champagne, after 
five days of beer and cider from the Alta and Bulletin. From the 
first — when it had emerged from its chrysalis stage, and spread 
its wings into a dozen pages — it waged war to the knife with hum- 
bug and fraud. It gave the Atta the characteristic name of 
"Granny." and one of its earliest fights in the cause of right and 
justice was the expose of the Kohler lead bar business. Its list 
of "Quacks " was long a feature of inters 

* * * 

How distinctly do I recall the esteemed founder and proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. Sr.. when first he came among us. I can see 
his short stout figure, his plump, boyish, clean shaven face and 
twinkling eye, his every expression bubbling over with genuine 
wholesome mirth and good humor. He had a kindly nod, and 
smile, and word for all, as ■with quick and elastic step his well- 
known figure came and went through the streets. Well do I re- 
member his taking me aside one day, when I was but a boy and 
saying: i; Write us something and see what you'll find under your 
plate at breakfast some morning. 

* * ■» 

There are many other memories which of right should have 
place here. But they flit through the brain, merely, and never 
seem to assume a sufficiently tangible form to give them words. 
It is, however, impossible, or next door to it, to write the recol- 
lections of thirty years without letting something slip. 



NEWS FOR US. 



WE artainly have to go abroad to learn news, as the following 
paragraph, which is taken from the London Court Circular, 
proves: "A Chinese Syndicate for introducing the electric light 
into the Flowery Kingdom has been formed* in Chinatown, San 
Erancisco, with a capital of £1,400,000, part of which is furnished 
by American investors. The company expects to hear news very 
soon of important concessions granted by the Chinese Govern- 
ment for putting electric plants in the large .:::-= of China. 
Meanwhile, a small plant will be put up in Chinatown to prove 
the merits of the system to the 



CATARRH. 

Catarrhal Deafness— Hay Fever— A New Home Treatment.— Suf- 
ferers are not generally aware that these diseases are contagious, or 
that they are due to the presenceof living parasites in the lining mem- 
brane of the nose an to *s. Microscopic research, how- 
ever, has proved this to be a fact, and the result or this discovery is 
that a simple remedy bas been formulated wherebv catarrh, catarrhal 
deafness and hay fever are permaner.Uv cured in from one to three 
simple applications made at home by the patient once in two weeks. 
S- B.— This treatment is no: a snuff :r an ointment; both have been 
discarded by reputable physicians as injurious. A pamphlet ex- 
plaining this new treatment is sent >n receipt of stamp by A H 
Dixon & Son. 337 and 339 West K :-: Toronto. Canada. 

_ „ — - rittian Standard. 

Sufferers from Catarrhal troubles =hould carefully read the above. 

J. F. CrrrES"s Old Bou*bos.— This celebrated Whiskv is for sale bv all 
druggists and first-class grocers. Frade mark— star within a shield. 



The following is from "Russian Characteristics tight- 

ly Rrriev: "On July 25th last, the busiest time on the Volga, the cap- 
tain of the steamer Samolet was walking on deck when his cap was 
blown off. He ran after it as quickly as he could, but it was blown 
into the water. Without a shaie of hesitation he gave the command 
to stop the engines. As they could not be stopped instantaneously, 
when the order was execoted the cap was far away. A second order 
was given, the steamer turned and steered straight for the captain's 
head-gear, but before the engines could be stopped it was outstripped 
and left behind. Other commands were issued, the direction changed 
and the chase recommenced, but in spite of the rapidity of the ves- 
sel's movements and the dexterity of the crew, the cap was not fished 
up. Whenever the vessel drew Dear the floating head-dress, and it 
seemed that in another moment it would be caught up by the boat- 
hook and restored to its owner, suddenly, as if driven of set purpose 
by a willful wind, it swept on farther and farther away. The steamer 
would then dash wildly after it. but the cap would again escape, to 
the bitter disappointment of its owner. The passengers were at first 
amused at the spectacle of a steamer chasing a cap, bat when thirty 
minutes had been spent to no purpose, they requested that the vesse 
should resume her trip. But while the captain was standing irresolute 
what to do. Lebedeff. a seamaD, jumped in with his clothes on and 
swam in the direction of the cap. He soon came up with it. caught 
it between his teeth, and began to return to the vessel. He had to 
swim against the current, however, and it soon became evident that 
he had not strength enough to reach the vessel. He began to lose 
ground visibly, and was being carried by the current away from the 
boat when the captain threw out a life buoy which he failed to catch 
hold of. On this he shoutei for help at the top of his voice, and a 
boat was lowered. After some trouble he was rescued and brought 
back to the steamer, but the captain's cap was never recovered." 

BATTKS. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

, Capital - — - $3,000,000 

WM. ALYOSD, President. 
Thomas Baowy. _ Cashier | B. Mra&AT. Jr . . . A-aristym Cashier 

AGENTS: 

>TW YORK— Azeney of the Bank of California: BOSTON— Tremont 

National Bank: CHICAGO— Union National Bank: ST. LOUTS— Boatman's 

Saving Bank: NEW ZEALAND— The Bant of New Zealand. Correspondent 

in London— Messrs. N. K. Rothschild & Sons. Correspondents in India, 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondenis in all the 

"::-:;:;::..:_.■: ■■_.:_: ln^r-ZT . :~ Hi :;" : i; _- i::i _ -._.; 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Late, 
Cincinnati. Portland. P.. Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Fraiikfort-on-the-Ma: n. Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno. Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland. Hongkong, 
: :_ii.~ r_iu Y : k: 'z.3jz ll. 3-e_: i. l_ i sll :LrL.a 1- _^l1- ^ii S^i^rlaZ.!- " 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

DEPOSIT VATJLTS, 

X. W. Cor. Bush and <ianwmt Sts*, San Franeiseo. CaL 

, Safes to rent from Jo to J100 per annum (under the exclusive control of the 
renter) for the care of S rocks. Bonds. Valuable Papers and Jewelry. 
Trunks, packages of silvera-are, bric-a-brac, etc,, taken on storage, at 
moderate rates, and for long or short terms. 

Special deposits of coin, bullion, stocks or bonds, taken by the month or 
year. 

A specialty made of the care of wills, and any instructions regarding 
their disposition upon the death of the testator faithfully carried out. 
S. G. MURPHY Presiieni JAMES K. LYNCH . .Manager. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (United), 

N. w. Cor. baasome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital. S2.500.000 | Paid Up Capital t2.000.000 

Reserve Famd. 1350,000. 

Hsad Ofpics - - 55 Old Broad Street, London 

ass>-ts— SEW YORK— Agencv of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.:, So. 10 Wall St.S. T. P A RT3— Messrs. Lazard Freres 4 Cie. lTBonle- 
Tard Poissoaiere. Draw direct on the princi pal c ities of the world. Cora* 
mereial and Travelers' Credits issued. DA VXD CAHS. / „„..__ 

EUGESE SETEK.I manag ers. 
C. ALTScsrx. Cashier. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

CAPITAL PAID UP t3.000.CW) 

ASKSCT at Sbw Toss 62 Wall Street 

AGSSCT AT VLBGISIA, SbvaDA. 

Loivdos B assess - Union Bank of London (Limited) 

DIRECTORS: 

JAMES L. FLOOD President 

JSO. W. MACSAY. A. E DATE, R- H. FOIXIS, J. F. BIGELOW. 

THE GERMAN SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California Street San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND I 1,065,000 00. 

Deposits July 1st, 1889 19,540.822 34. 

Officers— President, L. G0TTIG: Vice-President, EDV. KRUSE : 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS : Cashier, A. H. R. SC H VTPT : 
Assistant Cashier. WM. HEERMASS: Secretarv, GEO. TOCKSY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Chas. Meineeie, Ed»r. Erase. George H. Eggers S. 
Van Bergen, E. Meyer, 0- Schoeroann, B. A. Becker. Attorneys, Jabbob, 
Ha33isoV and Goodfsllow. 



Jan. 4, 1889. 



SAN KKAXriSi i) NEWS LETTER. 



21 



WRo; 




s.A.nsrKis. 



WHO IS MY NEIGHBOR? 

Thy "neighbor?" It is he whom thou 

Has't power to aid or bless, 
Whose aching heart or burning brow 

Thy soothing hand may press. 

Thy "neighbor?" 'Tis the fainting poor, 

Whose eye with want is dim, 
Whom hunger sends from door to door,— 

Go thou and succor him. 

Thy "neighbor?" 'Tis that weary man 

Whose years are at their brim, 
Bent with sickness, care and pain, — 

Go thou and comfort him. 

Thy "neighbor?" 'Tis the heart bereft 

Of every earthly gem, 
Widow and orphan helpless left, — 

Go thou and shelter them. 

Thy "neighbor?" Yonder toiling slave, 

Fettered in thought and limb, 
Whose hopes are all beyond the grave, — 
Go thou and ransome him. 

Where e'er thou meet'st a human form 

Less favored than thy own, 
Remember 'tis thy neighbor worm, 

Thy brother, or thy son. 

Oh! Pass not, pass not, heedless by! 

Perhaps thou can'st redeem 
The breaking heart from misery, — 

Go share thy lot with him. William Cutter. 



AS DIES THE YEAR.— Alfred Austin. 

The Old Year knocks at the farmhouse door. 

October, come with your matron gaze, 

From the fruit you are storing for winter days, 
And prop him up on the granary floor, 

Where the straw lies threshed and the corn stands heaped: 

Let him eat of the bread he reaped; 
He is feeble and faint, and can work no more. 

Weaker he waneth, and weaker yet. 

November, shower your harvest down, 

Chestnut, and mast, and acorn brown ; 
For you he labored, so pay the debt. 

Make him a pallet — he cannot speak — 

And a pillow of moss for his pale pinched cheek, 
With your golden leaves for coverlet. 

He is numb to touch, he is deaf to call. 

December, hither with muffled tread, 

And gaze on the Year, for the Year is dead, 
And over him lay a wan white pall. 

Take down the mattock, and ply the spade, 

And deep in the clay let his clay be laid, 
And snowflakes fall at his funeral. 

Thus may I die, since it must be, 

My wage well-earned and my work-days done, 

And the seasons following one by one, 
To the slow sweet end that the wise foresee: 

Fed from the store of my ripened sheaves, 

Laid to rest on my fallen leaves, 
And with snow-white souls to weep for me.. 



THE ORGAN-GRINDER.— London World. 



O'er Tuscan hills the moonbeams smite 
The sweet acacias' waves of white, 
And lovesick Echo softly sighs 
Each home-returning peasant's cries 
Across the olive-crowned hight. 

Yon surging sea is lovelier sight, 
And this gay throng yields more delight 
Than all that spreads 'neath stars that rise 
O'er Tuscan hills. 

Yet 'mid the happy crowd to-night 
An exile mourns ; the pageant bright 
Fades slowly, and his dead love's eyes 
Gleam from the grave where Nita lies 
Asleep beneath the cloudless skies, 
O'er Tuscan hills. 



CAPITAL PAID UP. 
RESERVE FUND ■ 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 



$2,500,000 
575,000 



Southeast comer California and Sansome Streets. 

Head Office— 28 CORNHILL, London. 

Branches— Victoria, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon; Seattle and Tacoma, 
Washington. 

Sub-Branches— New Westminster, Vancouver. Nanaimo and Kamloops, British 
Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened bud 
Ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland ; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English .Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD (Westlndies)-ColonialBank. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 

[established IN 1870.1 
UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY. 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID UP $1,500,100 

SURPLUS $300,000 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 162,974- 452,974 

DIRECTORS: 

3. G. Murphy, James Moffitt, George C. Perkins, Geo. A. Low, James M. 

Donahue, James D. Phelan, N. Van Bergen, Jas. H. Jennings, J. A. Hooper. 

President. S. G. MURPHY] Cashier E. D. MORGAN 

Vice-President JAMES MOPPITT | Ass't Cashier GEO. W. KLINE 

Transacts a general banking business. Issues Commercial and Travelers' 
Credits. Buys and Sells Exchange on London, Dublin, Paris, the principal 
cities of Germany and the United States. Collections made and prompt 
returns rendered at market rates of exchange. ^_^ 

THE ANGLO-CAUFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000] Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund. 650,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel Court, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. FRED. F. LOW, i Manftffera 

IGN. STEINHART.j ^^sera. 
P. N. Lilienthal, Cashier. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Capital and Reserve, $2,415,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. I London Office 73 Lombard Sl>, E. C. 

Portland Branch. 48 First St. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, William Steel. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets, $19,724,638.46. 

President, BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENS. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300,000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary 8. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. S. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL 11,000,000. 

DIRECTORS : 
OHAS. F. CROCKER, I E. H. MILLER, Je. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH President. 

W E BROWN Vice-Pkesident. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashieb. 

WELLS, FAR60 & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,694,8C5.04 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Win. Norns, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General BaDkin 
Business. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 4, 1889. 




THE last quarter of the year has been rainy, and the fall to date 
is 24 inches, being far in excess of any like period for forty 
years. 

Our 1889 trade with Japan may be summarized briefly as fol- 
lows: Flour exported, 26.203 bbls., value $119,703. This is the 
largest quantity of Flour shipped in five years; the gain this year 
over 1888 is 4,294 bbls. The Treasure shipment in 1889 was $4,066,- 
488, being nearly double that of the year preceding. Our total ex- 
ports to Japan for the year are $635,617, which is $54,000 less than 
1888, and for the past five years the total exports aggregate $3,301,- 
704. 

The China trade of the port for 1889 (exports) amounted to 
$2,656,866, which is a comparative gain over the year preceding 
of $288,477. The treasure shipments of the year to China (Hong- 
kong included) amounted to $13,434,402, which is again over that 
of 188S of $3,081,567. The exports of Flour for 1889—364,489 
bbls. — being a gain of 88,641 bbls. over that of the year preceding. 
The value of the Flour shipment is $1,523,327, which is a gain of 
$400,000, over that of the year preceding. The total Flour ship- 
ments to China the past five years aggregated- in value $7,608,173. 
Formerly we shipped large quantities of Quicksilver to China, but 
for a year or more past shipments hence have ceased, owing to 
the active competition of the Rothschilds of London, who now 
control that market. 

The tonnage market is but poorly supplied with ships suited to 
the grain trade. Among the recent charters we note that of a re- 
engagement of the Br. iron ship Duchess, of Albany, 1,746 tons 
Wheat to Cork, U. K., Havre or Antwerp, £1 17s. 6d. The ship 
St. Charles carried 1,662 tons Wheat same voyage, £1 15s. 

Since the 16th of November, 17 Whalers have sailed out of this 
port for a cruise to the south, preparatory to a voyage to the 
North Pacific in the Spring. Other vessels are preparing to go out 
early in January. Two of the oldest Whalers, stmr. William Taber 
and the Bark Coral are to be broken up. The latter vessel was 
built in 1819, and has long been in the service as a successful 
Whaler. 

The total Wool clip of California for the year 1889 aggregated 34,- 
068,770 lbs. Stock on hand, 2,500,000 lbs. Received from Oregon 
8,568,000 lbs. Received from Nevada 1,500,000 lbs. Imports, For- 
eign 720,370 lbs. Total supply for 1SS9 47,307,140 lbs. 

Wool exports by rail 1889, 30,232,840 lbs.; by sea 3,191,561 lbs. 
Total, 33,424,401 lbs. The total consumption for the year is 
placed by George Abbott to be 3,000,000 lbs. less than in 1888, 
and this by reason of only one mill being in operation against 
two the year previous. The clip of the State is 1,500,000 lbs. 
larger than in 1888. The value for the Wool export of the year, 
$5,500,000. 

The following letter from Simpson, Roberts & Co., of Liverpool, 
England, should be of interest to our salmon packers: 

We would like to submit to you a little information respecting the salmon 
situation in this country, which you can publish or withhold, in your best 
judgment. It seems to us the Pacific Coast shippers of salmon are losing 
their heads, by over-shipping to Europe, and the sooner the packing on the 
coast is reduced down by 50 per cent, of the 1889 pack, the sooner will the 
threatened future serious losses be averted. The eleven months this year, 
to 30th November, statistics of our Board of Trade, discloses that imports 
into Great Britain for the eleven months of 1889 are about 90 per cent, in 
excess of the imports of the same period iu 1888 and 1887, and we see by 
the shipments at sea, unarrived, that the total imports into this country are 
going to be extremely excessive. It is true, a portion of these imports were 
sold to arrive, but a large remainder is unsold, and buyers having lost their 
money on the portion bought will probably " fall upon the portion un- 
bought." It cannot, however, be good for producer, shipper, importer or 
distributor to have such violent fluctuations, and although it may be at 
first difficult to withhold shipments, shippers will find it in the end the 
best course to retain on your side all unshipped salmon and hold it over for 
distribution the following season, and therefore lessen the proportions for 
1.B90 packing by at least 50 per cent, less than in 1889. 

A LONDON journal states that M. de Lesseps and his colleagues 
will at no distant day have to announce the abandonment of the 
works of the Panama Canal. The subscribed capital is very 
nearly exhausted, and it appears impossible to raise any more. 
The faith of the French investor in M. de Lesseps, which was long 
maintained, has now been shaken, and it appears impossible to 
conjure any more out of the French peasantry and shopkeepers. 
The commencement of the Nicaragua Canal by American citizens 
will make the position of the Panama Canal still more hopeless. 

IT would seem that the Paris Exhibition did not pay its way af- 
ter all. From the final statement of receipts and expenditures, 
it appears that the latter exceeded the former by 17,000,000f. The 
deficit was met by a subsidy of 18,000,000f. from the state and 
7,000,000f. from the city; but these subventions cannot be regard- 
ed as legitimate revenue. The experience of Paris, therefore, may 
be accepted as decisive on the point whether international exhi- 
bitions can be made to pay their way. The answer is that they 
cannot. 



The progressive optician of the Pacific Coast, C. Muller, 135 Montgomery 
street, near Bush. 



JUST PUBLISHED ! 



"i" 

"Company 

san francisco blue b00k-1 889. 



BMkPoMPAiH 



y^ 



We take pleasure in making the following extraordinary and 
most liberal proposition in connection with the publishing of the 
Second Edition of the SAN FRANCISCO BLUE BOOK— 1889: 

FIRST.— Parties having Copper Plates in our custody, by calling 
and ordering 100 Visiting Cards from their plate and paying $1.75 for 
the same, will be presented with a copy of our San Francisco Blue 
Book with our compliments. 

SECON D. — Parties not having their Copper Plates in our custody, 
who will call and leave the same with us for their future use and 
benefit, and order 100 Visiting Cards printed from their plates and 
pay ¥1.75 for the same, will be presented with a copy of our San 
Francisco Blue Book with our compliments. 

THIRD.— Parties not owning a Copper Plate, by calling and 
ordering one and 100 Visiting Cards, and paying $3.50 for the same, 
and leaving the plate in our custody for their future use and benefit, 
will be presented with a copy of our San Francisco Blue Book with 
our compliments. 

FOURTH. — Parties living out of town, by sending their orders 
(instead of calling and leaving them), together with the amount 
sufficient to pay the bill, will be entitled to the same terms as residents 
of this city, and will have the package sent express charges paid. 

FIFTH.— All parties ordering Wedding invitations of us printed 
from Copper Plate, will be presented with a copy of our San Fran- 
cisco Blue Book with our compliments. 

The above offers hold good until the edition becomes exhausted. 

The published price of the Second Edition of our San Francisco 
Blue Book, for 1889, bound in full cloth, will be $2.50; sent to any 
address, postpaid, on receipt of price. 

In connection with publishing the Blue Book we have established 
a private 

ADDRESS BUREAU 

in the front part of our store, in conjunction with our Fine Stationery 
Department, and will each day make corrections in the Blue Book as 
we derive the information. 

To enable us to do this as thoroughly as possible we invite our 
friends and patrons of the same to keep us constantly informed with 
regard to any change of residence or any contemplated lengthy ab- 
sence from home. Such information obtained we shall be pleased to 
furnish to inquiring friends and patrons upon application. 

721 MARKET STREET, S F. 



188 ' 



BAN PRANCISl NEWS LETTER. 



23 



^ World. r ^s^^^^ ! ST. MATTHEW'S HALL, 

San Mateo, California. 

A SCHOOL FOR BOYS ! 



SOME time ago a report was floated to the effect that Lord 
Wolselej had accepted an Invitation to be present at the un- 
veiling of the Lee statue, which Is to take place at Richmond 
next month, says a London Boctety paper of Dec. 7th. Lord 
.tely.and seini-puMicly, denied the story, which 
has no other foundation than that in common with other promi- 
nent European soldiers, he received an invitation from the Rich- 
mond committee. He is nevertheless pestered with communica- 
tions reaching him from the United States assuming the correct- 
ness of the statement. He has now written a letter to one of his 
many American correspondents categorically denying the story. 
As this will doubtless tind its way into the American newspapers 
Lord Wolseley lives in hopes that he may hereafter have a time 
of peace. 

The strange story of the mighty Russian Empire being infested 
by an epidemic of influenza which has taken the hundred million 
Muscovites by the nose and throat, and the startling theory which 
an alarmist of the faculty bases on the visitation, rather impress 
themselves upon cockney attention just now; but some forty-five 
years ago, when influenza first made its bow in London, it killed 
thousands as remorselessly and suddenly as if it had been the 
plague. Afterwards people became accustomed to it, and eventu- 
ally liked it. 

The increase of suicide among German officers is extraordinary. 
In one month twenty-three shot themselves. Our authority, a 
German paper, says: " The number increased in June, and it is 
feared will go on increasing." Xo reason is assigned. Yet there 
is often such bitter lamentations at the slow rate of promotion 
that a suspicion may naturally be founded on this being the cause. 

There is a rumor that a number of Canadian horses are about 
to be imported as remounts for the cavalry, says a London paper. 
The chief recommendation that Canadian horses possess is that 
they are cheap, but when tried some years ago they did not give 
satisfaction in the regiment they were sent to. 

One of the most interesting antiquities of Windsor is about to 
disappear, namely, that part of the White Hart Hotel which is 
supposed to be the Old Garter Inn, to which reference is made by 
Shakespeare. In order to effect an enlargement of the modern 
hotel the Old Garter will be demolished. 

Brazilian titles of nobility are only held for life, and easily pur- 
chasable. The Emperor Dom Pedro, who was a humorist in his 
way, built and maintained a lunatic asylum with the product of 
the titles he conferred in the course of his long reign. 

The Court Journal has this to say: It is reported that it is in- 
tended to confer the command of the 10th Hussars upon Prince 
Albert Victor. For once we think report is in error. There are 
a great many reasons why — not. 



The following notice is posted up on the door of a fashionable 
place of worship in London: "You are requested to kneel at the 
more solemn parts of the service. Kneelers are hung on the irons 
down each side of the church." 

Mr. Gladstone is writing an article on Mr. Motley in an Ameri- 
can weekly periodical, the managers of which have previously 
paid him at the rate of £100 for an article not exceeding -1,500 
words in length. 



The King and Queen of Sweden have determined to pass the winter 
at Bournemouth, and are in treaty with Lord Wimborne to rent his 
large villa, Branksome Dene, situated on the "West Cliff, about a mile 
from the town. 

It is said that the Emperor William intends to cultivate men of 
art and science during the winter months, which are not to be de- 
voted entirely to formal Court receptions and dinners. 

The cold in the north of Russia has not been so severe as it is now 
for many years. In the province of Archangel numbers of peas- 
ants have been frozen to death. 

Princess Louise is now busily engaged in completing a portrait 
of the Queen, which she began during her autumn visit to Bal- 
moral. 



There is no foundation for the statement which has gone the 
rounds of the press that the Queen Regent of Spain is about to 
marry her uncle. 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR. 



REV, ALFRED LEE BREWER, M, I Rector, 



W SEND FOR CATALOGUE."®! 

TRINITY SCHOOL, 

1534 MISSION STREET, - - SAN FRANCISCO. 
SCHOOL FOR BOYS AND YOUNG MEN. 

Prepares for College, University and Business. 

Rev. Dr. E. I!, SPAUUNQ, Sector. 

HIGHLAND BRAND MILK! 

THIS OirSTIj'X" 

Absolutely Pure Condensed Milk in the Market. 

A PERFECT SUBSTITUTE FOE 
FEBSH Iv£IXjI^ OK. CEEilM. 

THE BEST KNOWN FOOD FOR INFANTS. 

It contains no sugar or chemicals, but is simply pure cow's milk, 
and can be used the same as fresh milk tor every purpose. 
For sale by all grocers and druggists. 

THE JOHN T. CUTTING CO., Sole Agents, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



GO TO 

Q-. "W. CLABK &c CO., 
653 Market Street, 

FOR 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 



DR. POSEY 

HAS REMOVED HIS OFFICE TO 

40* GEARY STREET, BETWEEN KEARNY AND DUPONT. 

Eye, Ear, Throat, Nose and Gullet. 

Hours— 10 to 3; Sunday, 10 to 12. 



REMEMBER THIS! 
Terry & Co., of Market street 
Every one kuows cannot be beat; 
Barest of value bere we gain, 
Remember, your furniture here obtain; 
Your bedding, carpets and stoves get here, 
A for cash or installments thro' the year. 
Come here for bargains, as all should know 
Our furniture dealers are Terry &. Co. 
747 and 749 Market Street, 
Opposite Grant Avenue. 



24 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 4, 1889. 



SOCIETY BOYS." 

Twelve years ago, when I recall. 
I made my bow at my first ball. 

And joined the social "mix." 
Eighteen I was; now, sakes alive! 
Ma shrieks when told I'm twenty-five — 

I sob at twenty-sis. 

I was the most engaging girl 

E'er dallied with the mazy whirl — 

A being wondrous bright. 
So mother said, but failing years 
Have brought me cause for gravest fears, 

That something ailed ma's sight. 

A husband was the prize I sought, 
The choice of all was mine, I thought, 

And ma, dear, thought the same. 
Young men of twenty-three or four 
I dubbed mere boys, and would ignore — 

I looked for older game. 

Bat twelve long years have slowly passed, 
My net I've set, my line I've cast — 

I haven't had a bid. 
I've prayed that somewhere there might be, 
One man in this wide world who'd see 

Me as my mother did. 

Last year I met and tried to get 
A member of the younger set, 

One whom I'd termed a boy. 
Alas! one day I heard him say. 
■• Ye gods, berid me of this 'jay,' 1 

She's kittenish and coy." 

And then, too late, I knew my fate; 
Doomed e'er to dwell without a mate, 

Without my pined-for joys. 
And Cupid then appeared and spake. 
" Dear miss, you've learned the grave mistake 
Of thinking young men boys." Deli>o. 

San Francisco, Jan. 4, 1890. 



M. J. FLAVIN & CO.'S 

Quarter of a Millon Dollars' Clothing 
Sale. Strictly Tailor-made Garments. 

THE SALE JUST BOOMING! 

CLOTHIIsTG SELECTED TO SELL I 

$250,000 in Fine Tailor-Made Goods to be sold out at 
prices more than popular. The Largest Clothing Sale ever 
undertaken in San Francisco. Strictly Tailor-Made. 

IT WILL PAT WELL TO VISIT THIS SALE ! 



James Drew, of Pearson, Michigan, wrote to a friend thus: " I 
can stump the world with your tonic. It has helped me amazinglv. 
I have only taken twelve bottles; my food digests in perfeot order 
now. I have an appetite strong enough to eat well, sleep well and 
drink well as long as it is Best Tonic.'' 



HOMESTEADS AND MATRIMONY. 

A^s interesting decision under the Homestead Law, is reported 
from "Washington, D. C. In July, 1885, a woman named 
"Wasson emigrated from Iowa to Dakota, settling in the Mitchell 
land district, where she took up a claim of eighty acres. She 
erected a house and made other improvements upon this land. 
Adjoining the Wasson traci \\~as a piece of land recently taken 
up by one Michael Barr. In process of time it occurred to the 
neighbors to combine their resources and affections, and the twain 
became one in holy matrimony. Then the trouble began. 
Neither wished to forego their homestead, so the two houses were 
moved to the boundary line, and so became contiguous, though 
there was no internal communication, and each formed a dwelling 
complete in itself, containing bed, stove, table, etc. In this 
manner Mr. and Mrs. Barr were able at any time to emulate 
folks of wealth and fashion, each occupying his own peculiar 
snite. But this state of Edenic bliss was not to last. Presum- 
ably in deference to the rigors of the Dakotan climate. Mr. Barr 
built a wall of sods around both honses, and thus apparently con- 
verted them into a single habitation, according to the strict in- 
terpretation of the Homestead Law-. Land Commissioner Groff 
has rendered a decision adverse to Mrs. Barr's claim to her orig- 
inal eighty acre on the ground that husband and wife cannot be 
held to occupy separate residences when living amicably together 
in the same house. Mrs. Barr's plea that when she took up her 
claim she acted in good faith, not knowing Barr or contemplating 
marriage with him, goes for naught. Xhe marriage and Barr's 
subsequent connecting wall of sods, especially the latter, have 
caused a peculiarly well-laid scheme to "gang agley." And it is 
said there are quite a number of cases now pending, almost 
identical with the Barr case. The moral ot the foregoing facts is: 
If two neighbors, so circumstanced, wish to marry, let them re- 
vere and dread the Homestead Law, restraining their inclinations 
until such a time as the land is secured beyond a peradventure. 
It is evident from this, that in future people will circumvent the 
Homestead Law by a breach of the Divine. 



No "wonder is it that all our young ladies who have sought en- 
gagements with theatrical managers have been able to get positions, 
for have not they all had the benefit of Mrs. Julia Melville-Snvder's 
teaching? This famous teacher lives at 138 McAllister street, and is 
one of the best elocution teachers in the State. 



Interior business solicited. Price lists free on application. Orders 
from, the interior filled with care and dispatch. Fall and Winter Catalogue 
now ready. Postoffiee bos 1996. 

M. J. Flavin & Co., 

Clothiers for the Hainan Race, 

924= TO 928 lyU^IRIKIIET STEEET, 

Through to 25 Ellis. 

CANADIAN ANTHRACITE COAL! 

No Smoke! No Soot! Clean, Clear, Cheerful! 

Thirtv per cent, more heating power than the bituminous coal sold in the 
marked Can be burned in any furnace, range, stove or grate with a good 
draught. 

No more blackened ceilings. No holes burned in carpets. Try it and be 
convinced. 

CANADIAN ANTHRACITE COAL COMPANY, 

Yard, Cor. Second and Branuan. 

Telephone No. 1610. 
J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS., Agents, 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

A. ftTJIET HOME, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 



PARKE & LACY 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CO. 



MINING. WOOD AXD IRON WORKING MACHINERY. 

ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING. OILS AN D SUPPLIES. 

J. W. GIRVIN & CO., 

RUBBER AND LEATHER BELTING, 

HOSE, PACKING, ETC., 
RUBBER CLOTHING, BOOTS, SHOES, ETC. 

DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES. 
2 and 4 California St., San Francisco, Cat. 



Fine Table §J>* 
wines *6 



ORLEANS VINEYARD 






Producers • 
oflhe 



^ 




Eclipse 

Champagne 

530 WASHINGTON ST. 

San Francisco 



NEW YORK 

P1B1 4 TTLWM. 917 BiMdnj 

PHILADELPHL\ 
t. P. MUST i CO. 25 J. tad Street 

CHICAGO 
t IETSS i CO., 110 Xldjson Sc«t 

ST. PAUL 

c jitis i co. i» e. hm sot« 

DETROIT 

G. 1 B. McMIIIiS, 131 Woftlird 1t«h« 

CINCINNATI 
JOS. B- FEEBLE SOSJ CO., Pita's BHg. 

HONOLULU 

KAMET05 J0B5SO1 



Jan. 4, 1880. 



S\\ FR.VNriSCO NEWS LETTER. 



25 



A CLERK'S LUCK. 

He Suddenly Find* Himself Master of a Competence. 

SAMTKI. BAKER, a clerk in one of the principal jewelry 
stores of the city, who lives at 19M| Bush street, is in luck. 
At the last drawing of the Louisiana State Lottery Company he 
Found himsell suddenly possessed of the snug sum of $16)000, he 
having purchased a coupon of ticket No. 03, which drew the 
capital prize. As BOOA as his good fortune became known Mr. 
Baker's friends came about him to offer their congratulations. 
One of the number was a reporter of the Call to whom Mr. Baker 
said: " For years past 1 have been in the habit of buying four 
or five coupons each month. This time I bought four, among 
which was No. '■'■>■ This coupon has quite a history. The agent 
took it Brsl to a woman who keeps a variety store on Lurkin 
street. She refused to take it, as she said so small a number 
never won much of a prize. He then sold it to a man down town, 
who kept it in his pocket for over two hours, when he returned 
it to the agent, asking for another and larger number. I guess he 
is kicking - himself over it now. Then the agent came to me and 
sold me four tickets, among which was this one. I took them 
without paying much attention to the numbers, and I was much 
surprised when I saw that I had won a slice of the capital prize." 
" What do you intend to do with the money?" asked the re- 
porter. ■• I shall let it rest for the present," answered Mr. Baker, 
"until I see some good opportunity for investing it advantage- 
ously and securely. It can draw interest until I have a chance 
to dispose of the capital in some enterprise that will prove both 
safe and profitable." — San Francisco (Cal.) Call, November 30. 



THE " Curse of Marriage " by Walter Hubbel, published by the 
American News company, is the latest novel bordering on dan- 
gerous ground. The story itself does not lead to that end, but the 
author, here and there, has something to say of his characters, 
which places them in a very bad light with the reader. There are 
some very poor stories [being issued by publishing houses nowa- 
days, and those who intend to peruse "The Curse of Marriage," 
had better prepare themselves for a good, long sleep. It is dry 
and unpolished, though at times it shows that the author is capa- 
ble of better work. When the book is finished, the readerhas about 
as faint an idea of the curse of marriage as he had at the start. 
Whether it is children or morphine, Mr. Hubbell does not state 
clearly, but leaves us to choose for ourselves. Mr. Hubbell has 
written several novels, but none as poor as this. 



THE Oregon people better understand how to encourage immi- 
gration than those of California. Sending out lectures and 
panoramic views is well enough in its way, but Oregon offers pos- 
itive inducements. One house of the Oregon Legislature has 
already passed a law amending the divorce law. It provides that 
husbands and wives having no offspring may procure a divorce 
by simply ceasing to live together. I don't think anybody can 
ask for anything more liberal than this, except, perhaps, that 
even when people have children they may be divorced with equal 
ease on making a suitable provision for them. This is very 'cute 
of the Oregonians. 

EVERY city, town and hamlet is at present so actively engaged 
in proving that it possesses bona fide cases of La Grippe that 
an outsider ignorant of the nature of the disease might be readily 
excused for supposing that the malady was either perpetual mo- 
tion, the philosopher's stone or a $100, 000 prize in the Louisiana 
lottery. 

If you have carpets that need to be beat, 
Send to the S. F. Carpet Beaters, 23 Tenth street. 
,S. Ferguson's work is prompt and neat. 

MILLS COLLEGE, 
Alameda. County, Cal. 

Spring Term opens JANUARY 9, 1890. For full information address 

C. C. STRATTON, President. 



j3u,y your 



oV/|\ ^"^ LIDHT 

8 \|TXTURES 

^DIRECT FROMTHE 

r ^ANUFACTUF\E(\S 

THOMAS DAY &C0.LTD. 




SAN FRANCISCO 0AL 



44ifc 




Binks— I'm elad you have gotten your liver in active service again, and 
have returned to French dinners. 

Jinks— Yes, I was cut out of French dinners for nearly a year. No use 
talking, they wear out a liver aud stomach very soon. But the ..Etna 
Mineral Waters with my dinners have brought me around again all right 
and I can now eat as heartily as before. " ' 

Dr. David Wooster, the eminent physician of 746 Mission street, writes- 
I have used the JEtua Mineral Waters in my practice for some time and 
cordially reeommeud it as one of the very besc natural mineral waters in 
the market, as a daily driuk. For disturbances inthe functions of the liver 
aud kidneys it is unsurpassed. 



K. 



THE 



COMPLETE CODE. 



K. 



For the use of Agents, Bankers, Brokers, Shippers, etc., etc., and the tele- 
graphing public. 



By 



STJ TH ER LAN D. 



Published by BYRE AND SPOTTI3WOODE, Her Majesty's Printers 
London, E. C; and E. & 3. B. YODNQ & CO., Cooper Union, New York 
Paris Agency— "Journal des Mines," 26 Rue Cambon. 

10 Draper's Gardens, E. C. 
Dear Sir: The " K. K. Code " is the best I have ever used. 

Faithfully yours, p. B. Behr. 

DUTTON & PARTRIDGE, 

214 California St., S. F., 

Agents for Pacific Coast. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President I ERNST BRAND Secretary 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL COMPANY, 

No. 310 Sansome Street, : : San Francisco 
; WHOLESALE DEALERS IN FURS. 

W. E. PRICE, D. D. S. 

DEWTAL OFFICE, 
S. E. Cor. Market and Fifth Streets, 

Rooms 9, 10 and 11, - San Francisco. 

$75.00 to $250.00 A MONTH 

Can be made working for us. Agents preferred who can furnish a horse 
and give their whole time to the business. Spare moments may he profit- 
ably employed, also. A few vacancies in towns aud cities. B. F. JOHNSON 
& CO., 1009 Main Street, Kichmond, Va. 

N B.— Please state age and business experience. Never mind about sending 
stamp for reply. B. F. J. & CO. 




Caligraph Type Writer, 



Most Rapid and Latest 

Writing Machine Supplies. 
THE SAMUEL HILL COMPANY, 

General Agents, 
29 New Montgomery Street 

San Francisco. 

Caution.— 1 wi&n tilt- public to understand that I employ no agents to 
peddle my guods. C. Muller, the leading optician of the coast, 13d Jtlontg. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 4, 1889. 



DOES NOT LIKE A SECRET BALLOT. 

SENATOR GORMAN, of Maryland, who is the ruling spirit of 
the National Democratic Committee, and ought to have been 
its chairman, does not like the new secret ballot, which has 
worked so well in one of the oldest as well as in one of the new- 
est of States. He says that it everywhere worked against the 
Democratic party. "We do not believe him; but if we did, we 
should say, serve the Democratic party right. If the emancipa- 
tion of working men from the thraldom of trades-unions or local 
bosses, benefits any one party more than another, then in the 
name of all that is decent, honest and independent in politics, let 
that party have an advantage which it so fairly comes by. We 
do not believe, and nobody believes, that the ballot is a chattel 
property, which may be bought and sold for a drink, or for two 
dollars and a half, or for any other consideration. Experience 
has, however, shown that in too many cases it is either bought 
or coerced. The merit of the new secret ballot, and it is an enor- 
mous merit, is that there is no way of determining to whom it is 
delivered, and therefore it is idle to attempt to either intimidate 
or purchase it. That is the rub. It is ridiculous to threaten 
Hans or Patrick with dismissal unless he votes your way, when 
you have to take his word as to how he votes. It would be a 
waste of money to pay for that which the seller cannot prove he 
delivered, and about which the purchaser must necessarily re- 
main in ignorance. The man who would sell his vote would not 
hesitate to lie about its delivery. That is what experience dem- 
onstrates everywhere and always, and, as a consequence, both 
bribery and coercion under the new system quickly cease, because 
both become utterly futile. The N. Y. Nation gives a good illus- 
tration of this. At a Connecticut town election, the other day, 
the workers kept an accurate tally of the voters and of their pro- 
fessed way of voting. Both sides agreed that the Democratic 
candidate for Mayor had been elected by a majority of 200. When 
the secret ballots came to be counted, it turned out that the Re- 
publican had been elected by a majority of 234. So long as the 
new system of voting continues, they will never again attempt 
to buy or coerce votes in that town. The same experience may 
be expected everywhere. 



IT appears from the statement of a morning contemporary that 
toy pistols are ranked among the list of deadly weapons, on. 
which score a little boy named Joe LagrafTe has been held for an as- 
sault with a deadly weapon, the bullet from his little gun having de- 
stroyed the eye-sight of a young fellow on horseback. If it is not 
permitted to sell liquor to minors, a, fortiori our juveniles should 
not be able to purchase deadly weapons, or have them presented 
to them under the guise and paternity of Santa Claus. The child 
is the innocent recipient; the giver or vender the guilty party. 
By following up the argument, if a Fenian filled his little one's 
stockings with dynamite, and they were to blow up a public 
building with them, the father would not be even a particepscrimi- 
uis. 



SOME heavy sales of mining property are reported from Mexico. 
A valuable coal property has been taken up by the Mexican 
Exploration Company, headed by F. Pigou, Chairman of the Pal- 
merijo Mining Company. A copper mine near Rosaris has been 
gobbled by " the Wool Pack," the London name for the syndicate 
controlled by Colonel North, the "Nitrate King." The latter 
property has been underwritten for $500,000. An engineer is now 
on his way from London to corroborate the expert reports. 

THE Minah Consolidated Mining Company is the latest Ameri- 
can incorporation floated in London. The property is the 
one recently reported on by the expert who examined the Shasta 
group of mines for London parties last year. If he could see 
nothing of value up there, it is difficult to conceive what there is 
about the Minah to warrant its selection. 



Ill Naples, a correspondent writes, there exists a race of cats who 
live in the churches. They are kept and fed by the authorities on 
purpose to eat the mice which infest all old buildings there. The 
animals may often be seen walking about among the congregation, 
or sitting gravely before the altar during time of mass. 

MR. Frederick Wedmore's volume on Balzac is finished, and 
will be published as the January issue of the " Great Writers " 
series. 



THE Atlantic and Pacific people have printed a handsome map 
of their route, with reading matter. It makes quite a valuable 
atlas. 



ANTWERP has very largely profited by the recent disturbance of 
the shipping trade in the port of London. 

BLACK silk handkerchiefs for full dress promises to be among 
the stylish articles for Winter wear. 

Fine Arts.— The European collection of fine oil paintings from 
Paris Salon, Munich Academy of Art and other art centers of 1889 
are now on exhibition and for sale at our Art Room, 581 and 583 Mar- 
ket street. S. & G. Gump. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Exchequer Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— Saa Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meetingof the Board of Directors, held on 
the liith day of December, 1889, an assessment (No. 28) of Twenty-five 
(25) Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-first day of January, 1890, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made he- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the eleventh day of February, 1890, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses ol sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, Sau Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Overman Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 31st day of December, 1SS9, an assessment (No. 61) of Twenty-five 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at 
the office of the Company, No. 414 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 5th day of February, 1890, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 26th day of February, 1890, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

GEO. D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 

Office— No. 414 California street, S an Francisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Bullion Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 4th day of December, 1889, an assessment (No. 35) of Twenty-five 
Cents (25c) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 20, 327 Pine street, San Francisco, California, 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 7th day of January, 1890, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 24th day of January, 1890, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. GRAYSON, Secretary. 

Office— Room 20^ 327 Pine street, San Francisco, California. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank, 
805 Market Street, corner of Fourth Street. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1889, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five aud fifty-two hundredths (5.52) on term deposits, and four 
and sixty hundredths t4.60) ou ordinary deposits, for the entire term of de- 
posit, and free of all taxes, payable on and after January 2, 1890. 
P. S. PORN, Acting Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society, 
526 California Street. 
For the half year ending December 31st, 1889, a dividend has been de- 
clared atthe rate of five aud forty hundredths (5 40-100) per cent, per annum 
on Term Deposits, and four and one-half (4^) per cent, per annum ou Or- 
dinary Deposits, payable on aud after Thursday, January 2, 1890. 
GEO. TOURNY, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union, 

532 California street, corner Webb. 

Branch : 1700 Market Street, Corner Polk. 

For the half year ending with the 31st December, 1889, a dividend has been 

declared at the rate of five and four-tenth (5 4-10) per cent, per annum on 

Term Deposits, and four and one-half (4^) per cent, per annum on Ordinary 

Deposits, free of taxes, payable ou and after Thursday, 2d January, 1890. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, 
Corner of Powell and Eddy Streets. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1889, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five and fifty-eight hundredths (5 58-100) per cent, per annum on 
Term Deposits, and four aud sixty-five hundredths (4 65 100) per cent, per 
aunura ou Ordinary Deposits, free of tax, and payable ou and after THURS- 
DAY, January 2, 1890. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

619 Clay Street. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1889, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of Ave and oue-tenth (o 1-10) per cent, per annum, on all deposits, 

free of taxes, and payaole on and after THURSDAY, Jauuary 2, 1890. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 



M. G, 
SPANISH 



PRITCHARD, 
TRANSLATOR, 



308 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



Jan. 4, 1989. 



SAN PR W» [S( NEWS LETTER. 



27 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 
PACIFIC BTBTm. 

Tr«m» Umve and are Due to Arrive «i 
SAN FRANCISCO: 

tiiTlj From December J. 1889. 1 arrive 

7 JO a. It * -. - « a r 1 - . N lies and 8*n Jose.. *12;46f. 
7»a. 3RcnuntoA ReddinR. via Davis 7:15 P. 
7-JOa Sacramento, Auburn. Colfax. 5:43p. 

8:00 a. Marliuci.ValleJo, Calistoga and 

Santa Rosa. 6 ^ 1& - 

8J0a. Los Angele* Express. Fresno. 
Baker.-fieid. Mojave and Ea,-t, 
and Los Angeles. 11:15 a. 

830a. Niles, San Jose, Stockton. Ioac, 
Sarramento. Marvsville, Oro- 

TlHe aud Red Bluff 5:45 p. 

10 Ma. Haywards aud Niles 8:16 P. 

•12-00 M. Haywards, Niles and San Jose *3:45 P. 

•1:00 p. Sacramento River Steamers — ••6:00a. 

8:00 p. Haywards, Niles and Sau Jose 9:45 a. 

3 30p. Second Class for Ogdeu & East. 10:45 p. 

4:00 p. Stockton and ^Milton; Vallejo, 

Calistoga and Santa Rosa. 9:45a. 
4 -30 p. Sacramento and Knight's Land- 
ing via Davis 10:45a. 

•4:30 p. Niles and Livermore *8:45 a. 

•4:30 p. Niles and San Jose 14:15 P. 

5-30p. Haywards and Niles 7:45a 

6.00 p. Sunset Route, Atlantic Express, 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 
Deming.ElPaso.NewOrleaus 

and East 8:45 p. 

7 -00 P. Shasta Route Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville. Redding, Port- 
land, Puget Sound aud East. 7:45a. 
800 p. Central Atlantic Express, Ogdeu 

and East^ 9:45a . 

Santa Cruz Division. 

13:00a. Hunters Train to San Jose 17:20p. 

8:15a. Newark, Centerville, San Jose, 
Felton. Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz. 5:50p. 

•2*15 p. Centerville, San Jose, Felton, 

Boulder Creek & SantaCruz *11:50a. 
415p. Centerville, Sau Jose, Almaden 

and Los Gatos^.^ • -___ 9:50a . 

Coast Division (Third aid Townsend Streets). 
7:25a. San Jose, Almaden and Way 

Stations 2:30 p. 

8:30a. San Jose, Gilroy.Tres Pinos, Pa- 
Jaro, Santa Cruz, Monterey, 
Pacific Grove, Salinas, San 
Miguel. Paso Robles and Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) & 

principal Way Stations 6 :12 p. 

10-30A. 8an Jose, and Way Stations.. 5:02p. 

12-01 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 3:38p. 

*3-30p. San Jose, Tres Pinos, SantaCruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, Pacific Grove 

and principal Way Stations *10:00a. 

♦4:20 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations... *7:58a. 

5:20 p. San Jose and Way Stations 9:03a 

6-30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. .. 6:35 a. 
+11-45 p. Menlo Park and principal Way 

Stations. +7:28 p . 

a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. +Saturdays only, 

JSundays only. ^Saturdays excepted. 

**Mondays excepted. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BKOADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers MEXICO and UMATILLA direct 
for VICTORIA, B. C, and PUGET SOUND ports, 
at 9 A. H. every Friday. 

The steamer UMATILLA, sailing every other 
Friday, at 9 A. M., connects at Port Townsend 
with Steamers IDAHO and ANCON for Alaska. 

Foe PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
the O. R. AND N. CO., every four days. 

FOB SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San 
Simeon, Caytjcob, PoetHaefoed, San Luis Obis- 
po, Gaviota, Santa Babbaea, San BUENAVEN- 
TURA, HUENEME, SaN PeDEO, LOS ANGELES AND 

San Diego, about every second day. 

Foe EUREKA, ARCATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, Tuesday, at 9 A. M.— LOS ANGELES. 

Foe POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, etc., every 
Monday and Thursday, at 4 p. M. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 214 Montgomery street, 
Near Fine. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, Sau Francisco. 

A. BUSWELL, 

Book- Binder, Paper-Ruler, Printer and Blank Book Manufac- 
turer, 
535 day Street, - Near Montgomery, 

San Francisco. 

JOSEPH GILL0TTS STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1878. 
«J^"These PenB are "the best in the world." 
dole Agent for United States, MR.HY.HOE. 91, 
John Street, N. T. Sold by all Stationers. 



NEXT. 

IF tongues wen- all attached to bruins, 
HOW thankful wo BnOuld be I 

If •• hogs " wen- barred from railroad trains. 

Bow thankful we should l>c! 
If fjut> an-l foibles wore tabooed, 
If gam were not by ladies chewed, 
If death would kindly steal the dude, 

lluw thankful we should he. 

— Chicago Herald. 
If eats would only sleep at night. 

How thankful we should be! 
If money would not get so tight, 

How thankful we should be! 
If women would not talk, forsooth. 
If ladies hats were less uncouth, 
If weather clerks would tell the truth, 

How thankful we should be! 

— Yonkers Statesman. 
If fishermen would stick to facta, 

How thankful we should be! 
If men would sit between the acts, 

How thankful we should be! 
If girls in front their hats would doff, 
If folks would stop at home who cough, 
If empty guns would not go off, 

How thankful we should be! 

— Boston Courier. 
If drink men's grief would really drown, 

How thankful we should be! 
If, on the floor, tacks fell point down, 

How thankful we should be! 
If babies would not cry at night, 
If politicians would do right, 
If men would pay their debts at sight, 

How thankful we should be! 

— Lawrence American. 

If railway trains were never late, 

How thankful we should be! 
If horse cars never made us wait, 

How thankful we should be! 
If hens would scratch away from home, 
If dogs would bark when burglars roam, 
If beer was never two-thirds foam, 

How thankful we should be! 

— Boston Transcript. 

THE great size of the new yacht destined 
for the Emperor William shows that 
longer voyages will be undertaken in her 
than the old ffohenzollem was equal to. It 
is not likely that cruising in European 
waters will satisfy the Kaiser's thirst for 
information. Asia and Africa will be vis- 
ited, and it is not unlikely that the Kaiser 
may cross the Atlantic, and see with his 
own keen, young eyes the United States, 
or the u New Germany beyond the seas," 
as Germans like to call it, and of which he 
has heard and read so much. 

MME. PATTI has no children. But she 
has a dog, upon which she lavishes 
much affection. The animal is a toy span- 
iel, and was presented to her by the Presi- 
dent of the Mexican Republic. A chicken 
forms its dainty dinner, and, being exceed- 
ingly dainty in its tastes, French bread sup- 
plies the more solid produce of confection- 
ers, and brandy is the liquid used to wash 
its dainty little feet when they become 
so iled with mud. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 
Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST AND BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 o'clock p. M., for YOKO- 
HAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yoko- 
hama with Steamers for SHANGHAI; 

Steamer. 1889. 

Gaelic Saturday, December 14. 

—1890— 

Belgic Tuesday, January 7. 

Oceanic Tuesday, February 4. 

Gaelic Thursday, February 27. 

Belgic Saturday, March 22. 

Oceanic '1 uesday, April 15. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, *or at 
No.202 Market street(UnionBlock)San Francisco. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
GEO. H. RICE, Traffic Manager. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE." 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 1889. and 
until further notice, Boats and Traius will 
leave from and arrive at the Sau Francisco Pas- 
Beuger Depot, MARKET-STREET WHARF, as 
follows: 



Leaves. F. 




Arrive in 8. F. 


Week 
Days. 


Sundays 


Destination. 


Sundays 


Week 
Days. 


7:40 A.M. 
3:30 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 


8:00a.m. 
5:00p.m. 


Petaluma 

aud 

Santa Rosa. 


10:40 A. M 
6:10p.m 


8:60a.m. 
10:30 a.m 
6:06p.m. 






Fulton 
Windsor, 
Healdaburg, 
Litton Springs, 
Cloverdale & 
Way Stations. 


6:i6p.M. 




7:40a.m. 


8:00 A.M. 


10:30a. m 
6:05p.m 








7:40a.M. 


8:00 a.m. 


Hopland 
and Ukiab. 


6:10 p.m. 


6:05 p.m. 


7:40a.m. 


8:00 a. M. 


Guerneville. 


6:10p.m. 


6:05p.m. 


7:40 a.m. 
5:00 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


Sonoma aud 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40a.m. 
6:10p.m. 


8:50 a. m. 
6:05 p.m. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for White Sulphur 
Springs, Sebastopol and Mark West Springs; at 
Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, at Cloverdale for 
the Geysers, at Hopland for Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville. Soda Bay, Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs, and at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs, Blue Lakes, Willits, Cahto, Capella, 
Potter Valley, Sherwood Valley and Mendocino 
City. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days— To Petaluma, $1 50, to Santa Rosa, $2 25: to 
Healdsburg,$3 40; to Litton Springs, $3.60; to Clo- 
verdale, $4.50: to Guerneville, $3.75; to Sonoma, 
$1.50: to Glen Ellen, $1.80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sunday only— 
To Petaluma, $1 ; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to Healds- 
burg, $2.25; to Litton Springs, $2.40; to Cloverdale, 
$3: to Guerneville, $2.50 r to Sonoma, $1; to Glen 
Ellen, $1.2U. 

From San Francisco for Point Tiburon and San 
Rafael, Week Days— 7:40, 9:20, 11:20 a. m. ; 3:30, 5:00, 
6:15 p.m. Sundays— 8:00,9:80, 11:00 A.M.; 1:30, 5:00, 
6:20 p. M. 

To San Francisco from San Rafael, Week Days— 
6:20, 7:55, 9:30 a. m. ; 12;45, 3:40, 5:05 p. m. Sundays— 
8:10, 9:40a.M.; 12:15, 3:40, 5:00 p. M. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week 
Days— 6:50, 8:20, 9:55 A. M.; 1:10, 4:05, 5:30 p. M. 
Sundays— 8:40. 10:05 a.m.; 12:40, 4:05,5:30p.m. 

On Saturdays an extra trip will be made from 
San Francisco to San Rafael, leaving at 1:40 p. m. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt, 

^V-TICKET OFFICES— At Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and No. 2 New Montgomery Street. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 
For New York via Panama, 

S. S. Colima Friday, January 3, 1890, 

at 12 o'clock noon, 

Taking freight aud passeugers dirert for— 
Mazatlan, Acapulco, Ocos, Champerico, San Jose 
de Guatemala, Acajutla, La Libertad, Corinto, 
Punta Arenas and Panama. 

For Hongkong via Yokohama, 

City of Peking Thursday, January 21, 1890, 

at 3 p. m. 

City of Rio de Janeiro — Saturday, Feb. 15, 1890, 

at 3 p. m. 

China Tuesday, March 11, 1890, 

at 3 p. m. 
Excursion Tickets to Yokohama and return at 

reduced rates. 
For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, cor- 
ner Firstand Brannan streets. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

Agents. 
G eorge H. Rice, Traffic Manager. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. 8., Hawaiian and Colonial Mails. 

Will leave the Company's Wharf, foot of Steuart 
and Folsom streets, 

For Honolulu: 
S. S. Australia (3,000 tons), Jan. 3, 1890, at 12 m. 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 
Sydney, Without Change: 

The Splendid New 3,000-ton Iron Steamer 

Alameda Saturday, January 11, 1890, at 12 m. 

Or immediately on arrival of the English mails. 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 

JOHN D. SPRECKELS & BROS., 
General Agents. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 4, 1859. 




THE great question of the day in England is labor. They are 
threatened in London with a strike of gas workers, which is 
brought about entirely by agitators, who are fattening on the 
British workman, and it appears that on the Clyde great incon- 
venience is experienced by ship-builders, because men absent 
themselves, though perfectly well able to perform their duties. 
An appeal from the local trades union to their members to be in- 
dustrious seems to have been of no avail, and the imposition of a 
fine of five shillings a day upon every man who absented himself 
one day in the week, when quite capable of working, has also had 
little effect. The public sympathy with the dock laborers' strike 
in London has certainly not improved matters. It has had the 
effect of encouraging the agitators to organize all over England, 
not apparently for the benefit of the men, but for the injury of 
their employers. This policy will, of course, cut both ways, for 
it will naturally tend to paralyze trade, and in the end there will 
be less demand for labor. 

Those in America who have given any attention to the subject, 
at present hardly realize the extent to which the relations between 
monopoly and labor are being studied in England, Americans ap- 
parently having adopted the " let alone " theory as the final word 
in conference. In England nearly every one recognizes that to 
let things alone means social disorder. Something must be done, 
and though students of the question differ widely as to the rem- 
edy, there is no doubt a convergence of opinion is observable in 
the direction of Socialism in some form or other. The recent an- 
nouncement by Professor- Alfred Wallace, the eminent scientist, 
that he has been " almost persuaded" to Socialism by reading 
Bellamy's " Looking Backward," is held by the philosophic So- 
cialists in England as one of the most satisfactory signs of the 
times, and there are many otheis hardly less significant. 

Speaking of Mr. Gladstone's position on the [great questions of 
reform now before the nation and which he promised he would ex- 
plain at the meeting of the National Liberal Federation at Manches- 
ter held during the first week in December, the London World says : 
Mr. Gladstone's explanation amounts in| substance to this, that 
he has no position in regard to these questions. When David 
Copperfield consulted Mrs. Crupp about his projected dinner 
party in the Adelphi, that grand old woman suggested of every 
dish as it was named that it should be obtained from the pastry 
cooks; an arrangement she explained which would leave her free 
to concentrate all her faculties on the potatoes and to see that 
they were served up as she could wish to see it done. So Mr. 
Gladstone, as item by item is mentioned, in the new Radical menu 
practically declined to have anything to do with it and insists on 
reserving himself for the Home Rule potatoes. How he will 
serve them up he does not disclose. There are secrets of the 
kitchen which must not be whispered abroad. "Trust me all in 
all or not at all " is the maxim of every cook who respects himself. 
It is Mr, Gladstone's business to prepare the dish, and it is for 
the country and Parliament to eat what is set before them and 
ask no questions. Mr. Gladstone is at present attending to his 
potatoes and cannot be disturbed. 

The Baltic provinces of Russia must now be as agreeable a 
place of residence as any other part of that free and happy em- 
pire. It seems that all the rights and privileges which the inhab- 
itants of the provinces have enjoyed ever since they were ceded 
to Russia are abolished. Russian is to be compulsorily taught in 
the schools in the place of German. Protestant pastors are re- 
moved and imprisoned on the slightest pretext, and the people 
are being pressed, morally and physically, to conform to the 
Greek Church. The elected mayors areflismissed, and journalists 
are even worse off, for they are deprived of their electoral rights— 
a punishment which even in Prance is only inflicted on the worst 
criminals. Altogether, Alexander III. is proving to the world 
that mercy, justice and toleration are words of which he does not 
comprehend the meaning. 

The Greeks, it would appear, are beginning to find out that the 
marriage of their Crown Prince to a Prussian princess was not, 
after all, such a great political event as they fondly imagined it 
would prove to be. They had the idea that when Kaiser William 
got to Constantinople he would persuade the Sultan to let him 
hand over Crete to the Greeks as a dowry for his sister. They 
are now waking up to the fact that the young Kaiser did nothing 
for the Cretans, and are notable to conceal the fact that the Turk- 
ish troops have walked over all opposition on the island, scared 
away the leaders, and mastered it so thoroughly that they are 
able to proclaim an amnesty to the rebels. So much for Crete. 

The English newspapers find, in the recent grant of a royal 
charter to the new South African Company, a subject for earnest 
congratulation. The Germans being now at a discount in Africa, 
the English promoters and well-wishers of the new enterprise see 



no reason why there may not be in Africa the establishment of a 
great English empire, like that founded in India by the famous 
prototype of this company. If the enterprise succeeds, the great 
sub-tropical region which lies between the Transvaal and the 
great lakes will not be Dutch, nor German, nor Portuguese, but 
English. British capital and British colonization will have an- 
other great era of extension, and one more large native population 
will come under British rule. 

There is a striking expansion of trade observable in the English 
Board of Trade returns for November, the exports being about 
two and a half millions more, and the imports six millions, and 
there appears every likelihood that the improvement will con- 
tinue. The reduction in stocks, in iron, for instance, between 
January 1st, and December 1st, has amounted to 900,000 tons, and 
there does not seem any sign of a falling off in demand, as there 
is great activity at all the iron manufacturing centers, and judg- 
ing from the number of new undertakings floated in London, in- 
stead of decreasing, it seems likely that business must expand in 
the United Kingdom, provided the strikes do not spoil everything. 

A very interesting sale of oil and color paintings will be held on 
January 13th and 14th, at the store of Messrs. Deakin & Bros., 33 
Post street. The collection originally belonged to one of the best 
connoisseurs on the coast, and contains very valuable artistic gems. 
There will also be several English etchings offered for sale, which 
have been selected with great care, some bronzes and some of the 
famous Satsuma ware. It is not often that such an opportunity has 
been afforded the public, and this sale should be well patronized. 

THERE will be a lull in the saloon business, but only for a brief 
period. For of all the resolutions made specially to be broken, 
the New Year's anti-liquor oath is the chief. 

A Cough, Cold, or Sore Throat should not be neglected. Brown's 
Bronchial Troches are a simple remedy, and give prompt relief. 25 cents 
a box. 



Moraghan, in the California Market, is the cheapest place for 
oysters. California oysters can be purchased for %2 a sack. 







CiRcviar) • Rf^Tj^ • noe- 
tic- FKlNfEPWiirl qflE-iTTrAoST- 

•NEflfMESJ- 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders in the Sierra Nevada Silver 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 15, Nevada 
Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 1 5th day of January, 1893, at the hour of 1 P. M., 
for the purpose of the election a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 

Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fraucisco, 
California. 

FAMILIES LEAVING THE CITY. 

Furniture, Trunks, Pianos, Pictures, Carpets, stored and taken care of 
Having no rent to pay, we store goods low. Advances made. References 
dating back 21 years, given. 

H. WINDEL & CO., 310 Stockton Street. 

Fresno and Merced County Lands to Rent and for Sale. 

75,000 Acres of Wheat and Sugar-Beet Land in the above counties to 
rent for a term of years. Also, 100,000 acres of fine Raisin, Fruit, Alfalfa 
and Sugar-Beet Land, with water for irrigation, for sale in tracts of from 
20 acres to large tracts suitable for colony purpose. For particulars apply 
to E. B. PERRIN, 402 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



MME. WALDO-COHEN 



Teacher of Piano-Forte and Singing, 
1215 Clay Street, San Francisco. 




LOUIS R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 

The Highest tirade Champagne in the World. 

(WHITE LABEL) 

A Magnificent Rich. Wine. 

"cB-E-A-nsrxj -vinsr sec," 

(BROWN LABEL) 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 

See that every Bottle bears the private label of 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

So/e Agents for the Pacific Coast. 



-TAB1ISHFP I800.I 

v°t. xr. «*h r**Nci« 0o 



Number 29. 



California Aflberiisjer. 

Dfvoteo to the Leaoino Int*ies's op California and the Pacific Oomq 
t*-mtrttand PiibUtftct errry Saturday by the }*r»prirtor, Frederick Marriott; 
FU>od Bu\' ~ San FrancUco, .Annual Sufc 

A.*ri; ' ■ itc* and Canada, $5; Foreign, $6. 

Kforn in, a« 8ccojtd<lajt$ matter. 

SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY. JANUARY if, 1890~~ 



WHAT HAS BECOME OF THE SAMOAN TREATY? 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Lkadin<; Aktl- LM Page 

Chinese Exclusion Again l 

What has Become of the Ssmoau 
Treat. 1 

Judge Wallaces Anti-Tru^ De- 

1 

Brtce rorthe Senate 2 

A ndency to go Wrong 2 

The Alaskan Lease 

Life Savioc 

As We Expected 

The Biiiehain Case 

Blaine and Gladstone- 

The Montana Difficulty 

Counterfeit Building Associa- 
tions. 

A Good Showiuc .. . 

An Impudent Rascal 

Society. 

Thrown t'pon her own Kesources 

The Thco^ophic Fad 

Pleasure's Wand 

A Prettv Entertainment 

w. F Beck & Co 

Justice in the Antipodes 

.St. Matthew's Hall 



Page 
... 8 



Sparks 

unworthy Jealousy s 

The Railroads 9 

Horse Raising 9 

Sporting. 10 

Business Blocks of San Francisco 11 

Photography versus Art 12 

The Rose Jar 13 

Financial Review 14 

Town Crier 15 

Sunbeams 16 

News Letter Postscripts 16 

Scientific and Useful 17 

Real Property 18 

Library Table 19 

Cured by "Li, Grippe " 20 

Vanities. 21 

"Biz" 22 

Care of Vosemite 23 

Oakland's Insanitv Mill 23 

World, Flesh and "Devil 24 

Bourse and Underwriter 25 

Gotham Gossip 26 

Obituary 27 

Comments on Foreign Affairs 28 



CHINESE EXCLUSION AGAIN. 

THE action of the New York Chamber of Commerce in recom- 
mending to Congress a re-opening of negotiations with China, 
looking to "a friendly adjustment of all questions between the 
two governments," means, of course, a revival of the question as 
to the propriety of excluding the Chinese from this country. 
That is the only difficulty between the two governments of which 
we have any knowledge. To what extent that difficulty has been 
the subject of diplomatic correspondence, the country would like 
to know, and it has every right to be informed. That Li Hung 
Chang very strongly remonstrated against the operations of the 
Scott Exclusion Act, there is the best reason to believe, and it 
would be highly interesting to learn precisely what he had to say 
about it. Has he threatened retaliatory measures? If so, what 
are the terms, nature and extent of his threats? Mr. C. P. Hunt- 
ington would seem to know something about them. In a letter, 
which forms the basis of the action taken by the New York 
Chamber of Commerce, he tells that body that " the Chinese, 
without uttering a word or lifting a finger, are able to retaliate 
effectively against our commerce." We confess that we do not 
comprehend the nature of the retaliation to which Mr. Hunting- 
ton refers. If he means — and that seems to be his meaning 

that the Chinese have it in their power to enter upon a policy of 
non-intercourse for commercial purposes, there is nothing very 
new or serious in that. The policy of China is now, and always 
has been of that nature. She never has bought anything of us 
that she could possibly do without, or could get cheaper else- 
where. Besides, retaliation of that kind is so palpably a game 
that two could play at, that the astute rulers of China may very 
well be trusted not to engage in it. The balance of trade between 
the two countries is enormously in favor of China, We could 
quickly change all that if we so desired. Japan is able to supply 
us with all the tea and silk we care to buy. India now controls 
the English tea market, and will within the next two years be 
seeking customers in this country. It is obviously not a good 
time just now for China to be thinking of playing tricks with the 
best market she has, and it is hardly likely that she is. If, how- 
ever, she has any such thoughts, and has expressed them, they 
cannot too soon be published for the benefit of our people. One 
of our Congressmen should make a motion for the production of 
the papers at an early day. There can be no doubt that there has 
been an interesting exchange of correspondence of a kind that 
ought to be made public. Heretofore the Mandarin rulers have 
pretended that they were anxious above all things to prevent 
their people emigrating. If they had meant what they said, the 
Exclusion Act would have met with their hearty approval. It 
will be curious to learn what excuse they offer for their incon- 
sistency. That they will prove equal to the emergency may be 
taken for granted. The wily Mongolian is not to be cornered for 
lack of a plausible explanation. It is, clear that the last has not 
yet been heard of exclusion. The New York Chamber of Com- 
merce represents the commercial instinct of the East, and when 
that is once fairly aroused, it will be very difficult to procure the 
re-enactment of the Exclusion Act, which expires next year. San 
Francisco's Chamber of Commerce is well advised in taking action 
that cannot be without an effect upon Eastern commercial opinion. 



THE I Hi ted States Senate has been in session over a month, but 
QO thing so far has hern done about the ratification of the 
Bamoan treaty or agreement negotiated by the three powers at Ber- 
lin. As an act of courtesy, if for no higher reason, it ought to 
have been promptly considered and dealt with. Nothing remains 
to render it operative save the ratification of the United States 
Senate. England and (lermany gave it their formal approval 
long ago. As an administrative measure it, of course, meets with 
the sanction of President Harrison. The majority of the Senate 
being of his* party, it would seem that the ratification of that body 
should be expected to follow almost as a matter of course. It 
would be a sore blow at the President, and at Secretary Blaine in 
particular, if. for any cause, it were to be rejected now. If 
further reasons were needed for early action, they would be found 
in the state of affairs that exists upon the islands, which is little 
short of lamentable. Samoa has practically been without a gov- 
ernment for a year past, and at this moment it is sorely in need 
of one that is effective, self-reliant and strong, to the end that 
without further delay order may be brought out of chaos. The 
war sadly confused things, and partial famine has since rendered 
confusion worse confounded. Mataafa rules at Apia.Tammassee 
is in the ascendant at Savaii, whilst numerous petty chiefs hold 
sway in other portions of the islands. The great storm of last 
year leveled the cocoanut trees and destroyed many plantations. 
Very little has since been done in the way of replanting. All 
parties are anxiously awaiting the ratification of the Berlin treaty 
and the arrival of the Commissioners to put it in force. It would 
certainly have been well if President Harrison had been advised 
to call an extra session of the Senate six months ago to dispose of 
this matter. It would not have very greatly inconvenienced the 
seventy-six wealthy gentlemen who composed the Senate to have 
called them together for a day or two to consider a subject so 
urgent. The country pays them a yearly salary, and is entitled 
to their services whenever needed. That there should now be 
further delay seems inexplicable. Can it be true that there is a 
feeling in Washington that the treaty is a mistake? Rumors to 
that effect have been current for some time. There can be no 
doubt but that circumstances that have arisen since the negotia- 
tion of the treaty have done much to discredit it. By its terms 
Malieotoa is made King, but he is not willing to serve, and is not 
able if he were. He is broken down, feeble and disinclined. His 
death cannot be far off. The treaty is understood to make Tam- 
massee vice-King, with the right to succession. This the numerous 
and conquering followers of Mataafa would never consent to. 
Then the settlement of land titles is a job not understood in 
Washington, and consummates a swindle that will one day bring 
scandal to this country. Unhappily, the ending of poor little 
Samoa's troubles is not yet. 

JUDGE WALLACE'S ANTI-TRUST DECISION. 

JUDGE WALLACE has added one more decision to the many that 
have been rendered in different states declaring the combinations 
known as trusts to be contrary to public policy and therefore ille- 
gal conspiracies that can be suppressed by process of law. The 
learned Judge holds that the unlawful character of the trusts con- 
sists in their combining to restrict production and enhance prices. 
This he deems a conspiracy against the public weal, which demands 
and requires the freest competition. His decision is in accord- 
ance with the old English common law rule and is unassailable 
as an abstract principle. Its applicability under all circumstances 
to the new conditions of trade that have sprung up in these latter 
days is another and different matter about which it is not so easy to 
pronounce with certainty. The common law rule carried to its 
logical conclusion is against most, if not all, the great incorpora- 
tions of the period. They are combinations and their tendency is 
to corral production and advance prices. It is the disposition of 
every great corporation to buy out its smaller competitors and 
thereby forestall the market as it used to be called. The Western 
Union Telegraph company is one instance out of many that 
might be cited. Its policy has always been to buy up competing 
companies to the end that it may control the telegraphing of the 
country and exact what charges it pleases. Strictly and rigidly 
apply Judge Wallace's dictum to that company and it would have 
to be suppressed as an unlawful conspiracy, injurious to trade 
and commerce, and detrimental to the best interests of the peo- 
ple. Our patent laws are in the same sense obnoxious. They 
prevent that free competition which is said to be the soul of 
trade. They build up monopolies and greatly enhance prices as 
the case of the Bessemer steel patent well illustrates. Even our 
protective tariff would come under the ban of the law. It pre- 
vents free competition and advances prices. These, instead of 
being deemed wicked purposes or unlawful conspiracies, are held 
in high esteem as virtues. If everything that interferes with free 
and unlimited individual competition is punishable as a conspir- 
acy, who is there that may hope to escape in these days of asso- 
ciated capital and co-operative labor? Trades unionists and 
kights of labor would certainly not go scot free. It may be pos- 
sible to formulate an abstract principle of law that will wisely 
discriminate between one class of combinations that is odious 
and another that is permissible, but it has yet to be done. The 
creators of the old common law precedents had not the multi- 
farious complications and interests of this great age to deal with. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 1890. 



BRICE FOR THE SENATE. 

CALVIN S. BRICE will almost certainly go to the United States 
Senate from the great State of Ohio. He is exceedingly 
wealthy, being a representative speculator of the Gould type. 
His first dollar was won on a chance transaction in stocks, and 
his last came from no other source. His Nickel Plate railroad op- 
eration is well-known, and is typical of all the toil which has 
made him rich. As a stock manipulator he will rank hardly 
second to a half dozen who are already in the United States Sen- 
ate, or in control of Wall street. He thus represents the worst 
side of that speculative spirit which is demoralizing the youth of 
the country and making the bucket shops and lotteries the haunts 
of millions, and has done more, through the demonstration of such 
examples of " success," to dull the moral sense of the people and 
arouse a growing feeling of discontent among the toilers of the 
nation than almost any other agency that occurs to us at this 
moment. And why is he to be selected over Ohio's many able 
sons? He has had no experience in public station, and is not 
even a resident of the State? His large cash contributions to the 
election fund of his party constitute an all-sufficient title to the 
place, according to the ethics of both political parties. Tbe plea 
which made Wanamaker a cabinet officer will make Brice senator 
from Ohio. Taking the current view of politics, is that plea not 
enough? Can any spoils-seeking politician of either party — and 
that phrase includes nearly every name of prominence in public 
life — regard it otherwise? Does not tbe logic of the spoils system 
lead up to just that conclusion? « What are we here for?" said 
Mr. Flanagan, of Texas, " but to get the offices." What did Brice 
spend thousands to carry Ohio for, but to be rewarded with a seat 
in the Senate? Men do not, nowadays, invest in politics upon 
the old-fashioned principles of the early fathers. Patriotism, love 
of country, ambition for laudable fame, are not now the incentives 
to public spirited action. Brice wants to write his name down on 
tbe Senate roll alongside of the hunored names of Webster, Clay, 
Calhoun and Sumner, and by the aid of ill-gotten coin he will do 
it. And why should he not? Party service, not fitness, demands 
the election of Brice, just as it demanded the election of Payne. 
It is true that Thurman had high character, great ability and dis- 
tinguished services to plead for him, but what mattered these 
when boodle for the hoys was needed, and must be had? Brice's 
Senatorial candidacy may be in itself a discreditable fact, but for 
all that it is one of the bright, consummate flowers of our spoils 
politics, over which honest men may lament, but in regard to 
which the present leaders of both parties should unite in clapping 
their hands. 



A TENDENCY TO GO WRONG. 

IT is remarkable what a tendency there is in police bodies to go 
wrong. Unless they are held well in hand by a strong and 
incorruptible governing power, it seems as natural for them to 
become rascally as it is for a duck to take to water. It was found 
some years ago that the detective branch of the service in London, 
although subject to very strict surveilance, and enjoying a pension 
system and other inducements to go straight, was, nevertheless, 
in league with thieves and participating in their plunder. On the 
Pacific Coast there is hardly a town in which very grave police 
scandals have not arisen within the past year. Stockton's Grand 
Jury has just shown the local Chief of Police up in a very unen- 
viable light. Two stubborn facts were proven, which the Jury did 
not hesitate to present in all their naked deformity. The Chinese 
regularly assess themselves to buy immunity from prosecution 
for gambling, and they as regularly get what they buy, which 
they could not do without the connivance and consent of the 
Chief of Police. The Jury # say that putting the two facts together, 
there can be no doubt as to where the money goes, although ac- 
tual demonstrative proof is lacking. Of course, the police will 
not give themselves away, and the Chinese do not squeal. No 
sane man, however, wants further or other proof than tbe exist- 
ence of things which would not be permitted to exist for nothing. 
The Grand ,1 ury has not indicted the Chief, because it had not the 
necessary legal proof, but it has reported the facts so clearly that 
his usefulness is gone and the termination of his official career 
cannot be long postponed. They set an admirable example to 
some other Grand Juries we know of. Stockton is not the only 
place in which there is a Chinatown, nor is it the only place in 
which the Chinese commit crime, and police' officers grow inor- 
dinately rich. It seems to be about the only place, however, 
in which a Grand Jury can be obtained that is not afraid to do its 
duty. Within the past year the chief officers of police have been 
found to be crooked in Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, Sacramento, 
Los Angeles, San Diego, and we know not how many places be- 
sides. In San Francisco they are practically responsible to no- 
body, and yet they are "the finest police force in the world," 
and, of course, as there is no power to call them to account, they 
always go straight. Of course, they do! That's how it comes 
that Chinatown is what it is, and certain police officers grow rich 
on an official income that does not suffice to keep them in cigars. 
Bah! 



THE ALASKAN LEASE. 

THE renewal of the lease of our seal islands is exciting a widely 
extended interest and begins to be clear that our government 
would do well to continue the existing arrangement with tbe 
Alaska Commercial Company until it has thoroughly investigated 
the whole subject matter and placed it on a permanent and sat- 
isfactory basis. It will not be fair to the new lessees, nor to the 
government, nor to anybody, to let the present annihilating pro- 
cess go on. The ruthless raids of Canadian and American seal- 
ers must be stopped, or in a very few years the Alaskan lease 
will not be worth having, and the sealskin saque, so dear to the 
hearts and comfortable to the human form divine of our ladies, 
will be a thing of the past. A very interesting correspondence 
has just appeared in the London Times on this subject. Mr. 
Flower, of the London Natural History Museum, writing from a 
scientific and purely disinterested point of view, tells us that 
scarcely a century ago fur seals existed on islands under British 
control in numbers which appear now almost incredible and 
which, if wisely protected, might have been as numerous to-day 
as they ever were. Every one of the many rookeries which he 
enumerates have been annihilated by the ruthless and indiscrim- 
inate slaughter carried on by ignorant and lawless sealers, re- 
gardless of everything but immediate profit. The only spot in 
the world, he tells us, in which the fur seals are now found in their 
original or even increased numbers is the Pribyloff group, a cir- 
cumstance, he says, that is " entirely owing to the rigid enforce- 
ment of the wise regulations of the Alaska Commercial Company, 
based on a thorough knowledge of the habits of the animals. 
But for this, the fur seal might before now have been added to 
the long list of animals exterminated from the earth by the hand 
of man." From all of which it is obvious that something has got 
to be done to protect the seals on the one spot in the world on 
which they have taken refuge. Whilst that spot is every season 
surrounded by marauding vessels there can be no adequate pro- 
tection, and the islands must soon cease to have an appreciable 
value. The subject now seems to be clearly understood in Eng- 
land, and there is every reason to believe that an amicable adjust- 
ment of existing difficulties could be reached that would be en- 
tirely satisfactory to this country. Such an arrangement Secre- 
tary Bayard long ago suggested. It should be effected by the 
present administration before the new l*»ase is sold and interest 
in the matter dies out. In the interests of honest dealing and 
the preservation of the fur seal the government ought to define 
and guarantee what the concession amounts to before it asks 
bidders to put a price upon it. 

LIFE SAVING. 

IT is a very happy thing to have been instrumental in saving 
a human life, and if any one virtue more than another maybe 
truly said to be its own reward, it is surely the consciousness that 
prompt and timely assistance has saved a fellow being from death. 
To be sure, there is nothing exceptional at all in the desire to do 
it. It is only what every well-disposed nature would desire to do 
if the opportunity offered. But it is not given to everybody to 
be keen-witted enough to see the opportunity when it is straight 
before them. There were a number of very worthy people who 
did not see it the other night when that poor fisherman was shiv- 
ering and drowning out on a rock at the entrance of the Golden 
Gate. The attaches of the Merchant's Exchange did not see what 
an occasion they were face to face with. The harbor police were 
blind to it, and, strangest of all, even the government life saving 
service did not realize the great necessities and possibilities that 
confronted them. It remained for somebody in the Examiner of- 
fice to seize upon the idea to do the right thing in the right way at 
the right time. A tug that already had steam up was promptly 
sent to the scene with two bright reporters on board anxious to 
distinguish themselves. They were bound to accomplish the pur- 
pose of their trip if daring would doit. It almost goes without say- 
ing that they succeeded. One of them performed the perilous feat 
of jumping from a boat and swimming to the rock with a line, 
and although he was unable to deliver it to the castaway, he had 
the satisfaction of seeing it finally thrown into the poor fellow's 
hand, with the result that he was saved. The plunge into that 
cold and boisterous sea on such a night, demonstrates that Mr. 
Haxton is a man of nerve, as well as of aquatic skill. Nobody 
will more highly value the feat he performed than an expert 
acquainted with its dangers. His act, reckless and needless as it 
was, gives to the occasion a touch of heroism that has been made 
the most of. The practical outcome of what happened is the les- 
son it teaches as to tbe disgraceful inefficiency of the Government 
life-saving service. The fact that the employes at the Station 
looked for hours at the poor fellow in danger of being swept off 
that rock, without raising a hand to save him, is so discreditable 
that the department will now be compelled to not only overhaul 
that particular station, but to put the entire service on a new and 
better footing. The lifeboat service has performed noble deeds in 
other countries, and in the hands of the right men, with the 
proper appliances, it will accomplish no less here. 



Jan. 11, : 



SAN 1 i; VNCrSCO NEWS LETTER. 



BLAINE AND GLADSTONE. 

THE telegraphic • mutuary published last week, of the debate 
Gladstone and Blaine, In the North American Review, 
failed to do justice to the power of the Englishman's argument, 
ami t.> the cheap trickery of the American's. It Is no( Mr. 
Btatne's fault that he i* a hombng be was born so— but it is 
painful to a patriotic American lo sec the Blainesqae form of 
reasoning dragged out "f the smoke <-f a Presidential campaign 
and set up for the world's inspection as a typical American pro- 
Hurt alongside "f tin- faultless logic of a statesman like Gladstone. 
the scarcely concealed contempt of the English 
debater for a people that can still take seriously such arguments 
as form the bulwark of the tariff system. "America." he says, 
may at present be said to diet on the cast-off reasonings of Eng- 
lish protectionism. Like a phonograph, the American protection- 
ist simply repeats on his side of the Atlantic what has been first 
and often, and long ago said on ours." These words were written 
without seeing Mr. Blaine's ••argument," but they fitted it like a 
jersey. Aside from the standard fallacies of reasoning, the only 
points with which Mr. Blaine has enriched the discussion are de 
liberate and conscious misrepresentations of fact. He rests his 
case principally upon the historical argument, asserting that high 
tariffs have always been followed by prosperity, and low tariffs 
by depression. He knows that in the low tariff period, from 1846 
to 1861, the country advanced in wealth, and the workers in 
comfort, more rapidly than in any other period before or since. 
He knows that during all that time there was only one financial 
panic, which lasted for only six months, leaving the country 
more prosperous tban ever. While during the high tariff period, 
from 1S61 to the present time, there have been two prolonged 
stretches of hard times, covering six and four years, respectively 
— ten solid years of misery. And yet he has the audacity to say 
of the awful depression of 1873 that " the financial distress was 
relieved and prosperity restored under protection, whereas the 
ruinous effects of panics under free trade have never been re- 
moved except by a resort to protection." It would be an inter- 
esting experiment to have Mr. Blaine penned up just once and 
compelled to speak the truth. 

THE BINGHAM CASE. 



AS WE EXPECTED. 



THE Supreme Court has decided, Justices Sbarpstein and Thorn- 
ton dissenting, that Superior Judge Lawler was wrong in hold- 
ing that the Board of Supervisors is the sole judge of the qualifi- 
cations of its own members. The lower Court bad for its justifi- 
cation and rule of action a decision of the higher Court, but that 
did not avail. The Supreme Court had formerly held in the case 
of Metzer, at Los Angeles, that the Supervisors alone had jurisdic- 
tion to pass upon the qualifications of members of their own body. 
So long as that decision stood, it was binding upon Judge Law- 
ler, whose official oath requires him to take the law from the Su- 
preme Court. He could not know that the Appellate Court would 
reverse itself at the first opportunity. He is, therefore, blameless, 
and must have decided as he did, no matter what his party poli- 
tics or affiliations. The second mind of the Supreme Court seems 
better than the first. The last decision is the most equitable, and 
the most in keeping with sound public policy. Under the former 
ruling no Supervisor would ever be ousted who voted with the 
majority. That legislative bodies shall judge of the qualifications 
of their own members is an old English rule of Law that has long 
since and with great advantage been abandoned in that country. 
Now the election and qualification of members of the House of 
Commons are enquired into by the Courts, and all parties are 
agreed that the change has been in every way beneficial. Sooner 
or later public opinion will drive Congress to a similar course. 
The present method is as scandalous as it is frequently unjust. 
Tho case against Supervisor Bingham will now be heard upon its 
merits, but we have no idea that the gentleman from the first 
ward will vacate his seat this year. It will be altogether excep- 
tional if the lawyers do not find a way pf prolonging the litigation 
until his term expires. Nothing will separate the Buckley nine. 

COUNTERFEIT BUILDING ASSOCIATIONS. 

ATTORNEY-GENERAL TABOR, of New York, has rendered 
an opinion which practically expels the " national building 
associations " from that State. Mr. Tabor holds that such associ- 
ations are subject to the law governing the organization and reg- 
ulation of trust companies, and are not, as they claim, exempted 
as " institutions for savings." This law requires' every such com- 
pany to submit to the State Banking Department, semi-annually, 
a report of its affairs and condition, and also to " deposit with 
the State Banking Superintendent ten per cent of its paid-up cap- 
ital stock, which shall not be less than $50,000." This is a condi- 
tion with which the national associations could not comply if they 
would, since they have no capital stock. . The local associations, 
of course, are not subject to the rule. Their business is done at 
home, their security is visible and accessible, and they are amen- 
able in every respect to the laws of their State and city. Specu- 
lative corporations, whose management is surrounded by no such 
safeguards, have no right to complain if they are treated with 
suspicion. 



WHEN Secretary Wfndom's silver plan was first promulgated, 
the N i Wfi l.i i 1 1 i: pointed that if it went through, the wheat 
men would be heard from next, asking that their product should, 
like silver, be made the basis for a paper currency similar to that 
which Mr. Windom proposes to issue. That very thing has al- 
ready occurred. A prominent Dakota banker has written the 
Secretary of the Treasury an open letter, in which he makes an 
application of the kind indicated, and sustains it with a strong 
argument. He shows that wheat was the earliest Anglo-Saxon 
measure of value; that it regulated rents in England down to a 
very recent period; that its value in 3,000 years has not varied 
more than that of silver; that, unlike silver, it has never in any 
country or age been discredited or thrown out of use; and that it 
is always and everywhere in demand, as one of the necessaries of 
life, which silver is not. It is universally useful, finds a market 
everywhere, can never be produced in excess of the demand, and 
helping it to maintain steady prices would be an assistance to a 
vast body of the tillers of the soil, who do not otherwise share in 
the benefits of the protective policy of the country. The objection 
that a wheat currency would require large storehouses, he meets 
by asking what better use the Government could make of the 
surplus tban building large storehouses, which have to be built 
by somebody, and that in any case granaries would be a more 
useful public possession than silver vaults. The Dakota banker, 
it must be confessed, makes out a mighty strong case, which Mr. 
Windom will not succeed in answering unless he first abandons 
the whole theory on which his silver plan is based. The iron 
men and the copper men have to be heard from yet. Why should 
they not demand the use of their commodity as a basis for gov- 
ernment money? Where, in short, is this thing to end? 

THE MONTANA DIFFICULTY. 

THE political affairs of Moniana are in a muddle. Neither side 
will permit the other to organize the Legislature, and, in con- 
sequence, money cannot be voted with which to carry on the 
public service. Meanwhile both parties have gone through the 
form of electing United States Senators, who will presently appear 
in Washington, and probably so bedevil the body of which they 
claim to be members that nothing but partisan strife will be heard 
for the remainder of the session. As the difficulty is about to 
assume national importance, it will be interesting to learn next 
what it amounts to. Upon the returns from the Silver Bow pre- 
cinct depends the party complexion of the Legislature. The votes 
cast show a majority of three for the Democrats. The State Elec- 
tion Board gave certificates of election to five Republicans. The 
County Clerk, upon whom the duty legally devolves, gave certifi- 
cates to the five Democrats, who had a majority on the face of the 
returns. The Republicans claim that there was crookedness some- 
where, and produce affidavits of eight men supposed to be Dem- 
ocrats, in which they are made to swear that they cast Republican 
ballots. The local excitement became so great that four of the 
men left the country, and the remaining four presented them- 
selves and swore that their names to the affidavits were forgeries. 
Those are substantially the facts of the case. The Democrats are 
to be credited with the most confidence in the integrity of their 
position. They have made a thorough canvas of the precinct, 
and claim to be able to verify the bona fide of the returns. They 
have made several offers looking to that end, which the Repub- 
licans have refused, relying, apparently, upon their capacity to 
seat the two Senators they have chosen. It is a very pretty squab- 
ble as it stands. The Senate will now wrangle over it. 

A GOOD SHOWUtfG. 

THE Board of Supervisors met last Thursday afternoon to take 
preliminary steps toward fixing the water rates for the year, 
to the end of July 1890. Chairman Kingwell opened the proceed- 
ings by blandly informing those present that the Supervisors were 
acting with the best intent and purposes, and that in order to get 
at the true sLatus of affairs they had invited the officers of the 
Spring Valley Water Works company to make a statement. The 
showing made by Spring Valley during the course of the examina- 
tion was eminently good. George F. Allardt, who was under ex- 
amination, testified that he was a civil engineer of considerable ex- 
perience, and, in his opinion, the works were worth $25,000,000. 
This value was based upon calculations of the cost of similar 
works, and the property was worth precisely what it would cost 
to furnish a substitute for it. He estimated that the company 
could furnish 30,000,000 gallons of water daily, regardless of the 
seasons, and the conduits, which have a length of 46,006 miles 
have a capacity of 52,000,000 gallons a day, or 22,000,000 gallons 
more than the needed supply, and the w r orks could be increased 
to furnish the city with 110,000,000 gallons a day. In speaking 
about the cost Mr. Allardt said that the new and old works would 
be worth altogether $45,502,798. On being asked whether a syn- 
dicate of capitalists could be found to purchase the Spring Valley 
Water Works for $25,000,000 Mr. Allardt promptly said " No," as 
there was no security for the maintenance of rates. In conclusion 
he said he knew of no city in the United States which has as good 
a water supply as San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 1890. 




HOW chill ia the air just now, and how nipping the frosts have 
been this week. I do not think that San Franciscans take 
very kindly to such prolonged cold weather. It is preferable to 
the succession of rain storms given us the past six weeks, inas- 
much as one can get about without fear of being drowned in the 
mud, but that is the only welcome I have heard the heavy frosts 
receive, which, having ceased to be regarded as a curious novelty, 
are deemed most intrusive, unwished-for visitors. Our winters 
are becoming decidedly colder every year. Twenty years ago a 
white frost was looked upon as something of such very rare 
occurrence as to merit remark, even if it barely whitened the 
ground a couple of times in the season during the very early 
hours of the morning; and people were able to dress the whole 
winter through in garments that it makes them shiver to even 
think of now. I do not meet many old Oalifornians who enjoy 
the change; all prefer the days of the past when fires were an ex- 
ception, not a necessity and the rule, as they decidedly are now. 
Most of the holiday absentees have returned to town from their 
visits to Del Monte and elsewhere, and will now probably be con- 
tent to spend the rest of the winter in San Francisco, at least 
while the season lasts, for Lent comes early this year. The 
promise for much gaiety, however, for the next five weeks seems 
good, and much interest is being taken in the approaching His- 
torical Carnival, to be held at the Pavilion by the ladies of the 
Church of the Advent the week after next. 

Several concerts have helped to fill up the week very creditably, 
the other notable events being the dance of " the club " which 
met at Mrs. Pope's on Thursday night, it being the evening named 
for her to receive them, and the cotillion of the Bachelor's Club 
at B'nai P/rith Hall last evening, which was led by Mr. George 
Vernon Gray. 

The society wedding of the present week was that of Miss 
Sophie Gibbs and Mr. Frederick Johnson, which took place at 
Grace Church, on Tuesday evening, where were assembled a large 
number of guests to witness the ceremony. The comfortable 
warmth of the church was in delightful contrast to the chilly air 
outside, it being one of the coldest nights of a very cold week, 
and the Christmas greens which ornamented the structure lent 
their aid towards making the interior most attractive. Ferns, 
palms and smilax were largely used in the chancel, while on the 
altar Christmas roses and chrysanthemums were to be seen in 
profusion. The ushers had a comparatively easy time of.it in 
seating the guests, who, as a rule, always wish for some other 
place than the one to which they are shown. Possibly the numb- 
ing effect of the outside air caused them to be easily pleased with 
whatever was offered them, and less disposed to fault-finding than 
usual. Added to this, the airs with which the organist whiled 
away the wait were soothing to a degree. At length the welcome 
notes of the Lohengrin Chorus pealed forth, and the trio of ush- 
ers marched up the aisle, preceding a quartet of pretty maidens, 
the Misses Gibbs, Miss Sachs and Miss Bucknall, who looked like 
a group of rosebuds in their costumes of pink, even to their 
gloves and the bouquets they carried in their hands. The maid 
of honor, Miss Helen Gibbs, who came next, was robed in a lovely 
shade of green, and the bride and her father came last. The bridal 
costume was of heavy corded silk, en traine, and richly trimmed 
with lace. A tiny bunch of white hyacinths held in place the 
bridal wreath, and a large bouquet of the same sweet blossoms 
was carried in the bride's hand. The groom and his best man, 
Mr. Charles Gibbs, Jr., met the party at the altar, where the Rev. 
Mr. Foute read the marriage service, and then, to the strains of 
the Mendelssohn Wedding March, the cortege retraced their steps 
down the aisle in reversed order. The reception at the bride's 
home, on Post street, was confined torelati^fes and intimate friends. 
The rooms were prettily dressed with red berries and fern leaves, 
and knots of red and white ribbons, but the chief feature was the 
handsome supper served as soon as all had assembled. 

The inclemency of the weather, and the absence of ao many of 
our social lights from the city, made last week rather a dull one 
in town, but one of the prettiest little cotillions danced this win- 
ter was that given at the Presidio on Friday evening of last week, 
over which Miss Perry was the presiding angel. Flowers, greens 
and the national colors, gracefully arranged, served to make beau- 
tiful the ballroom, and the excellent music of the First Artillery 
string band kept the dancers' feet moving merrily in accord with 
its strains. The favors, though simple, were pretty, and the fig- 
ures danced may be placed in the same category, and the sapper 
was most appetizing and appreciated. There was a large attend- 
ance of our belles, who all dearly delight in an army dance, and 
the night, fortunately, was fine enough to rob the drive across the 
reservation of most of its terrors to those who feel timid to un- 
dertake it in darkness and rain. At least that was in getting 
there; the home-coming was a different matter. 

The third of the Oakland Club germans, which was given at 
Simmons Hall the same evening, was under the leadership of Mr. 
Harry Houghton, who made a complete success of it. Quite a 



number went from this side to take part in the cotillion, of which I 
one or two of the figures were new, and the evening was a thor- ! 
oughly enjoyable one to all. 

Mrs. Percy Selby has decided not to remain in town, after giv- ! 
ing up possession of her present quarters to Mrs. Delmas, but will 
return to her home at Menlo Park. Miss Inez Macondray's 
friends will no doubt be glad to hear that she will stay for some 
time yet in the city, visiting relatives. 

Mr. J. S. Wood, well known in society circles, has purchased a 
very choice site on the hills of Sausalito, commanding a grand 
view of the bay and straits, where he will erect a cosy bachelor's 
hall in the Swiss style of architecture, finished in hard and pol- 
ished woods. Mr. Wood's great taste for the beautiful will no 
doubt make this one of the prettiest homes in Sausalito. 

Last Wednesday the Ladies of the Hermitage Association gave 
a Jackson Historic costume reception at the Maxwell House, 
which was very largely attended and which proved a success. 

The sad news has been received in this city of the death of 
Madame Sawyer, nee Jeanne Elizabeth Laroche, the aunt of 
George A. Berton, of this city. Mme Sawyer's death took place 
at the home of the Sisters of the Holy Family in Paris on No- 
vember 26, 1889. Mr. Berton is now in Paris. The engagement 
is announced that he will marry M'lle Friscot at Brest. 

It is with pleasure we announce the engagement of W. L. Lyle 
to Miss Sara M. Kelly, the daughter of James R. Kelly, the well- 
known mining manager, who is associated with Mr. Flood in his 
numerous enterprises. Miss Kelly is a highly accomplished young 
lady and an extraordinarily clever musician. The news will be 
heard with great satisfaction by their numerous friends. 

Our good people seem to be too thoroughly engaged in the ef- 
fort to keep warm here in California to apparently care to en- 
counter a still greater degree of cold by leaving the State. Some 
few departures, are, however, taking place, among them being 
that of Mrs. Col. Savage on her periodical visit to Russia, and her 
daughter who is living there. She had been spending some time 
at the Baldwin before leaving, since breaking up house-keeping. 
And Captain Wheeler, the popular late Quartermaster at the Pre- 
sidio, has gone with much reluctance to his new post of duty, 
Los Angeles. Felix. 

MARCUS MAYER. ~ 

MARCUS MAYER arrived last Thursday night, and was imme- 
diately interviewed about the coming Patti season. In the 
course of his remarks he said they were going to give fourteen 
performances, commencing on February 10th. Five would be 
Patti nights, and there would he no performances for the benefit 
of poor relations, and *">e guaranteed that at every production 
either Patti, Albani or the great tenor, Tamagno, would appear. 
He positively assured his listeners that this was really Madame 
Patti's farewell visit here, and that she looks exceedingly charm- 
ing with red hair. He remarked, in parenthesis, that the great 
diva would pass her next birthday, which fell on February 19th, 
with us, but politeness prevented him from mentioning her age, 
though he knew it. 

AN IMPUDENT RASCAL. 



IT is to be hoped that the State Board of Trade will make an 
example of J.Meredith Davies, their late bookkeeper and cash- 
ier, who has been found to be $950 short in his accounts. Davies 
instead of being grateful to the officers of the State Board of 
Trade in not having him arrested, has assumed a defiant air and 
says he is not responsible for any deficiencies that may have oc- 
curred. Such barefaced impudence deserves punishment and if 
the State Board of Trade were wise, they would put this imperti- 
nent rascal in such quarters where he might get repentant over 
his nefarious conduct. 



Parisian lady;, thorough French and Music Teacher, wishes en- 
gagement as resident or visiting governess, or would chaperon young 
lady; unexceptional city references. Address " Lady," News Letter. 

Go, beautiful woman, and improve thy skin with Mme. Rachel's 
Bloom of Youth for the complexion. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W. B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 
PACIFIO OOAST, 

123 California St. S.F. 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOR SALE BY ALL FIRST-CLASS 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



Jan. 11. iss«». 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THROWN UPON HER OWN RESOURCES. 

[Hy Pi VniN-s.] 

EVKKY year the number of women who become self-supporting 
.iily on the Increase. Many of these sisters of labor 
have entered the guild >>i working-women from financial necessi- 
ty, others because thej have emancipated themselves from the 
l<>nf-e*tablishe<l idea that marriage was the sole destiny of a woman. 
While they are not unwilling to admit that for those who are 
conscious of a vocation for the married life, it may present the 
happiest environment for a woman, yet they seem to put all per- 

' sonal consideration of it aside. Not infrequently does one of the 
band allow herself to be convinced that singleness is not always 
blessedness, that instead of struggling on alone she had better let 

I some one take up her burden for her. Nor are the chances against 
her being glad of the step. But to many a woman that oppor- 
tunity will never come. She must be self-supporting, unless she 
be will ing to absorb from others what she should earn for herself. 
As to results, it is to be doubted if it be a good thing for a 
woman to place herself in active competition with a man as a 
wage worker. In one way it hardens a woman. She must steel 
herself to meet rebuffs without minding them ; she must knit her 
nerves together and face the inevitable struggle for place, for po- 
sition, for a chance to show what she can do. She must brace 

, herself in advance against the disappointments sure to come. 
She must increase her natural shrewdness, and be on the alert to 
resist imposition. Generally speaking, woman's work is under- 
paid, not because of inferior quality, but because it is performed 
by a woman. It is only too well known that when a woman 
works it is because she needs the money, and if she need the 
money she will not dare to refuse the price offered, in the hopes of 
receiving a better, for fear she will lose the opportunity to earn 
even what she knows is only a fraction of the proper compensa- 
tion for her work. Seldom, if ever, is a really fair bargain struck 
with a woman. Take a case in point. A certain fancy goods 
store in this city has long made a bid forpatronage on the grounds 
that to buy from its counters is to encourage a disinterested at- 
tempt to aid Deedy women and girls to earn a livelihood by mak- 
ing crocheted articles. The firm charges a good round sum for 
these things, but claims that it makes no profit whatever, that 
the price they charge is only sufficient to cover the cost of the 
worsted, and the sum paid to the worker. What are the facts? 
The woman who must crochet all day long, with scarcely a break 
for her cup of tea at noon, will receive fifty cents for her day's 
labor, provided she has not used more than the allotted amount 
of material. She must crochet just so loosely, or the supply will 
run short, and the deficiency will be made up at her own expense. 
Fifty cents a day, and only rapid fingers can earn that ! And the 
worsted, does it cost the firm another fifty cents? and when did 
they ever sell such a garment as has taken her a day to knit or to 
crochet for a dollar? Yet the public are led to suppose that the 
woma n ^ets the major part of what is charged fori,he article! 

The sight of a woman striving to earn her own living at first 
awakens a man's pity, and then dulls his sense of chivalry. At 
first it seems a hard thing to him that a woman should be obliged 
to labor for her daily bread; he grows to think of the idea with- 
out a shudder, and finally he is convinced that it is the only pro- 
per course. "I work — why .shouldn't she?" is his thought, and 
when " she " happens to be his wife, pity her. No measure more 
protective of the right of woman to be taken care of and re- 
strained from slaving for a lazy man could have been passed. than 
that ordinance of the Board of Education which debars a married 
woman from being eligible for election to the San Francisco School 
Department, and which declares that by marrying, a teacher 
would forfeit her position. This rule has borne hard, however, 
upon the noble youths whose idea of manhood was compatible 
with the thought of marrying a woman for the sake of what she 
might be able to contribute to the maintenance of a common 
purse. Am I advocating the proposition that a woman should 
be kept in genteel, or even in shabby-genteel, idleness ? No, not 
at all; but there is a vast difference between supporting one's 
self and in being married by a man as a means to his support. 
What true woman would refuse to put her shoulder to the wheel 
when the family carryall seemed stuck in a financial slough of de- 
spond ? Whatjwife worthy of the name would stop to think twice 
before she hastened to engage all her abilities to help her husband 
tide over the current of monetary difficulties? What true 
woman's heart would not break at realizing that her husband was 
willing for her to struggle on in the work after he was able to re- 
lieve her? Yet sometimes the most loving of husbands become 
the most inconsiderate of taskmasters.. A man is not conscious 
of the ossifying process that may be going on within his moral 
nature. It occasions him no surprise that what he once looked 
upon with horror he now regards with complacent composure. 

All this is relative of those who may begin their womanhood as 
wage-workers. But there is another, and, alas! a very large class 
of women who, late in life, are forced to face the necessity of do- 
ing for themselves. To such it comes doubly hard, for they have 
the memory of the past to s.tand ever between them and the 
present, and they are also without the powerful incentive afford- 
ed by hope, coupled with an ignorance of the obstacles to success, 



which is the direct inheritance of the young. They understand 
what the advertiser meant when he said, "No discouraged per- 
son need apply." When thrown upon her own resources, what 
is a middle-aged woman to do? The demand of the times is for 
specialists— for trained labor. In England, "decayed gentlewo- 
men » let lodgings, and the guileless traveler is warned by those 
of wider experience to have as little to do with the " decayed gen- 
tlewoman" as possible in their capacity of landlady. What makes 
it all the harder for women thrown upon their own resources is 
that their need of money is immediate. They cannot afford the 
time necessary to perfect themselves in any particular vocation. 
Each one must be self-supporting at once. What is she to do? 

THE THEOSOPHIC FAD. 

WE may expect a local boom in theosophy now that Bertram 
Keightley, the secretary of AInie. Blavatsky, has emerged 
here, and is giving the public the benefit of the wisdom which he 
probably absorbed from the high-priestess of the faith. He talked 
this week on " Reincarnation and Karma," and kindred topics, 
demonstrated very lucidly that the ego in man is very large and 
persistent, and that it takes a good deal to exhaust it, Well, the 
history of theosophy has proved the same fact. If the Blavatsky 
had not a very powerful ego, it would have been knocked out 
several years ago by the repeated exposure of her frauds. Nearly 
every one remembers the terrible indictment that was found 
against her when the rooms she had fixed up in Madras were ex- 
amined and found to contain secret doors, traps, windows, etc., 
by which her feats in necromancy were performed. The servants 
whom she employed bore witness to her deceptions, and the ef- 
fect of these disclosures was so great that the priestess re- 
tired from the public gaze for many months. In the last few 
years she has issued two works on theosophy, in which she speaks 
with authority as a leader, yet expert critics, who have made a 
study of , Sanscrit, declare that she does not know this language, 
although it is as essential to any correct knowledge of theosophy 
as Hebrew and Greek are to the proper interpretation of the 

Bible. In her latest book — a little collection of sacred precepts 

she leaves the reader to infer that she has translated these from 
the original tongue in which they were written — probably the 
Thibetan. This claim is kindred to her statement that she spent 
several years in a Thibetan lamasery. There is no evidence, 
aside from Blavatsky's own word, that she was ever in Thibet. 
In a word, she is a superb example of what audacity will ac- 
complish, and if the man who claims to be her ex-secretary would 
only tell the public something about her secret methods, he would 
secure an audience that would test the capacity of any hall in 
this city. 



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SAN PKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 1889. 




" We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 

ONE of the best-known melo-draraas on the stage, is Harbor 
Lights, the attraction at the (J rand Opera House this week. 
It is a great pity that the comedy work could not be made 
more efficient, as there is plenty of room for it. This is the great- 
est fault of the play, but it can easily be excused, as the rest of 
the author's work places it far above the average of similar sen- 
sational productions. The Grand Opera House cast is somewhat 
unevenly divided. Lorinier Johnstone is sadly out of his ele- 
ment as Nicholas Moreland, the leading villain, and although 
there are two more villains of lesser magnitude, they easily handi- 
cap Mr. Johnstone, who is too stagey to be natural. It is not 
right to be so harsh with Mr. Johnstone, for his stage experience 
is but small, and he has already done some good work. But act- 
ing is not only speaking lines, and affecting lengthy strides; it 
should form a part of the expressions of the face, the movements 
of the body as well as the general make-up and idea of the char- 
acter. George Osbourne and Edwin Henley played the parts of the 
other villains, Frank Moreland and Mark Helstone. While both 
did excellent work, Mr. Henley's was particularly noticeable. 
He spoke his lines in a thoroughly effective manner, and per- 
formed the many little details of stage business in a way that 
made his performance perfect. William Morris was a gallant 
hero, always on time to knock down a scheming villain, or to 
save some poor girl from being ill-treated. His appearance was 
certainly manly. The comedy work rested on the shoulders of 
Harry Bell, and he bore it bravely through the piece. Aa for 
the ladies, Isabel Morris might have been a little more earnest in 
her acting during the first act; the rest of her work was good. If 
she would discard that blonde wig it would improve her looks 
considerably. Mary Hampton -was very dramatic as Lina Nelson, 
and showed good schooling. No one in the cast did better work. 
Eleanor Barry had a most ungrateful role in which to make her 
opening, but she showed considerable spirit. Kate Chester should 
try and break herself of the bad habit she has lately acquired of 
talking like a six-year-old baby. It makes her work appear lu- 
dicrous, and will never be of any benefit to her. The scenic ef- 
fects were well mastered, and the production showed careful 
preparation. It will run a week, and next Monday Hoodman 

Blind will be given. 

» # # 

The Emma Juch company has arrived safe and sound, though 
a alight bit chilled by the cold trip over the mountains. None of 
the singers have the influenza, for which we may feel very thank- 
ful, for there is nothing more aggravating than to hear grand 
opera when it is eminating from hoarse throats. The opening 
Monday night promises to he a society event, and the advance 
sale of seats predicts a large and fashionable audience. In giving 
the list of members last week, we mentioned Alonzo Stoddard as 
one of the troupe. Since then word has been received that Mr. 
Stoddard died in the Homeopathic Hospital in Boston of heart 
failure. Mr. Stoddard was well-known as a baritone, having 
sung with Emma Abbott for several seasons, and while with her 
made his great mark as Valentine in Faust. He last sang at the 
Boston Theatre, appearing as Count Arnheim in The Bohemian Girl. 
By an unusual coincidence this last character was the one which 
was also his first in opera, he having made his debut as Count 
Arnheim in New York City twelve years ago. 

* * » 

Rices's elaborate production, of what is aaid to be a tuneful 
comic opera, entitled The Pearl of Pekin, will follow the Boston 
Howard Company at the California next week. The piece ia 
mounted with unusual splendor and biearre. It ia a Chinese 
story, and the characters are mostly chineae. Louis Harrison, the 
jolly comedian, as the Mandarin, is the central figure and the main 
factor of the performance. Besides his well-known " Bing-Bin- 
ges," the baritone " singer," he will sing " Near it," a topical song 
which made quite an impreasion when heard here some few 
months ago. The chorus is large, and the scenic effects, costumes, 
and surrounding about as elaborate as any Rice ever supervised. 

# # # 

Although Starlight has been surpassed by many farce comedies, 
and is much poorer than the average Hoyt production, it will, 
however, prove a drawing card for Verhona Jarbeau. As a farce 
it is totally devoid of any merit, and those who have sat through 
it at the Bush street Theatre this week, may have wondered why 
Jarbeau does not play in something more substantial. There is 
plenty of opportunity for her songs, dances and other catchy do- 
ings, and were it not for the star, the light of the piece would 
have been extinguished long ago. Jarbeau is a treat in her way. 
She ia so utterly different from other comediennes that her ap- 
pearance is always looked for with, pleasure. For three long 
hours she uses her talents in a piece which would not be toler- 
ated more than thirty minutes were it not for her. Jarbeau's 
support is somewhat better this year than last. Bert Coote and 
Charles Kirke, who were here with the defunct Kitty company, 



have the moat to do in the way of horse-play, and some of their 
antics are very amusing. The young ladies are to the average, 
and all of them show careful drilling. Of Miss Jarbeau's songs, 
mention need not be made. They are the same ones she has 
always sung, and there is only one — " Pi-ouit " — that improvea 
with age. Next Monday ahe will appear in Strictly Confidential, a 
play new to this city. 

* # # 

After four years hard study, in Europe, Miss Lena Devine re- 
turns to us gifted with a high, pure, soprano voice, which her 
many friends praised Wednesday evening, at her concert in 
Irving Hall. Miss Devine sang Gounod's waltz air, << Non Des- 
tarmi," one of the daintiest pieces known. It requires an artist 
who can thoroughly grasp the dainty strains and put them into 
execution without spoiling the effect, to sing this composition. 
Miss Devine's work waa marvelous, for she sang the difficult 
measures with wonderful brilliancy, showing the great range her 
voice had, and the prudent training it had received. Alfred 
Wilkie was the only other soloist. He gave Auber'a " Discendi 
Sono Vago " and two new songs composed by Mrs. H. J. Stew- 
art. The first waa Swinbourne'a pretty poem , » Love at Sea," and 
the aecond a charming little thing written by Peter Robertson, 
the well-known dramatic critic of the Chronicle. Mrs. Stewart 
caught the sentiment of both poems, and her music showed con- 
siderable talent. Henry Heyman and Noah Brandt, who make 
every concert a pleasant one, assisted, aa did Messrs. Bernal 
Jaulis, Rudolf Patek and F, S. Gutterson. 

* # * 

M'me de Sadowska-Peixotto won many admirers, last Friday 
evening, when she gave her concert at Irving Hall. A great deal 
of interest was taken in her San Francisco debut and her many 
friends completely filled the hall. When she first appeared she 
sang an air de salome, "Herodiade," by Massenet. The composition 
gave but little scope for the range of the voice, and M'me Piex- 
otto was kept singing mostly in her lower register. However, 
she showed that her voice was well schooled and powerful and 
when she sang in the trio '.' La Gioconda," and also in her Rus- 
sian songs, she showed her voice was not lacking in range or 
execution. One of the most interesting numbers on the pro- 
gramme was the first, a Sextette Op. 100, by Jadassohn, for piano 
(four hands) and string quartette. It was given for the first time 
in California, and a better composition we have not heard for 
some time. The remainder of the programme was well carried 
out and greatly enjoyed. 

* # # 

Mme. Billoni was suffering from a throat trouble last Tuesday 
night, when she was tendered a benefit concert at Irving Hall, 
but she sang so well that but few could notice it. So few really 
good singers have been in our midst of late, that it is a pleasure 
to hear Mme. Billoni, and were she a woman of better health, we 
would see her more in grand opera. Her singing Tuesday evening 
thoroughly pleased those present, and gave evidence of the 
singer's capabilities. Hermann Brandt, Herr Zimmerman, J. C. 
Hughes, Mrs. Carmichael-Carr, Mme. Zeiss and Miss Ernestine 
Goldman assiated in making the concert a success. 

# » * 

The Tivoli's comic opera company has been busy this week re- 
hearsing Vogt and La Fontaine's new opera, Furiosa. It will be 
put on Monday night. 

# # * 

The Shadows of a Great City will be the bill at the Alcazar next 
week. It is a melodrama well suited to the Alcazar company, 
and an interesting performance may be expected. In the mean- 
time Mankind has been drawing many admirers. 

# # # 

Louise Manfred has severed her connection with the Tivoli. 

Belle Thome only stayed one week with the Duff troupe.— 
Henry G. Peakes will be heard no more at the Tivoli. The Al- 
cazar is soon to undergo improvements — on the inaide. ■ Mias 
Florence Tobin has composed a new schottische entitled Little 
Puck, which shows considerable merit.- ■ St. Luke's Hospital 
will be tendered a benefit at the Bijou Theatre on the evening of 
February 1st, by the Bohemian Amateur Opera Bouffe Company, 
who will produce The Bells of Corneville, with the following cast: 
Henri, F. K. Tobin; Grenicheux, Albert Tissot; Gaspard, Dr. Ar- 
thur T. Regensburger ; Bailli, Eugene A. Beauce ; Notary, R. Y. 
Cole; Serpolette, Miss Florence Tobin; Germaine, Miss Anna 
Wood; Gertrude, Miss Opha Miller. The company is composed 
of some twenty-five of San Francisco's young society people, and 
all of them are vocalists of merit. They successfully produced 
The Mikado some time ago, and it has always been their wish to 
give heavier works. They will be assisted by an orchestra of 
twenty pieces, under the leadership of Sig. G. Saldierna. — Geor- 
gine von Januschowsky has retired from the Duff troupe, and will 
be heard on alternate nights in Mme. Juco's company. 



McAlester& Jones, Real Estate Agents and Rent Collectors: Office 
422 Montgomery street. The best regulated office in the city. Menofexperl- 
ence, having studied the wants of landlords and tenants for 26 years; reli- 
able, prompt and responsible in the management of real estate, renting, 
sailing and collecting, and taking full charge of property at lowest rates. 






SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



A PRETTY ENTERTAINMENT. 

AVERY delightful entertainment tru given last Saturday even- 
ing academy on Butter 
street. The ball was prettily decorated in Bcarlel and green, and 
the rich »nd fanciful costumes worn by her pupils made the scene 
one *>f unusual brilliancy. The grand march commenced pre- 
cisely at 7 :«• p, m.. and \\:i> led by Miss Smith and Miss Marriott, 
the smallest children In the class. On its conclusion the class 
formed the quadrille known as "Republican and Democrat." 
among the pretty dances of the evening was the " Highland 
Fling, *' by Hiss McArdle, dressed as ■* America," and " La Belle 
Jardiniere," by Miss Bowlin, who waa arrayed in garments which 
represented •■ Brazil," while Miss Alger, the graduate of the year, 
danced the •■ Pas Seed," f" r which she received much applause. 
lira. Clarke then presented her with a prize for her studies. A 
very pretty dance was that of the " Highland Fling," danced sep- 
arately by Miss Marriott, little Miss Schelineand Miss Smith, who 
competed for a doll. The prize was taken by the 'cute little tot, 
Miss Smith, amid great applause. The " Zingarella " was well 
danced by Miss Kortz, dressed as a " Bluebird," and Master Heyer 
as a "Spanish (ientleman." The «■ Cachuca," with castanets, was 
danced by Miss Lawson, representing " Night," Master Kolff as a 
■• Count," |and Miss Hendy as a " Fairy." The double " Craco 
vene " was danced by Miss Bowlin and Master White; the " Co- 
quette " by Miss Lawson and Master Kingrose as a " Prince." 
The "Sailor's Hornpipe" was danced by Miss Bowman, dressed 
as a "Greek Girl;" the "Tambourine," by Miss Smith, as "Sun- 
rise," Miss Cochrane as " Dewdrop," and Master Eichbaum as 
" Charles the Second;" the " Gavotte," by Master White as " Ko- 
iueo," and Miss Denis as "Daisy," Master Cox as a "Cavalier." 
Miss Davis, in orange and scarlet, and Miss Rolff as a " Turkish 
Lady," and Miss Marsden in pink silk and lace, danced the " Ro- 
berte " very skillfully. Among the pretty costumes were: Miss 
Forbes, as "Ariel;" Miss Scheline as " Butterfly," and Master 
Bromley as a " Norman." 

W. F. BECK & CO. 



MR. W. F. BECK has sold out his interest in the firm of D. L. 
Beck & Sons, and has decided to enter into business for himself, 
and we cordially hope that the success which attended him while 
a partner of the old firm will follow him in his new venture. Mr. 
Beck is an enterprising and clever young business man, who has 
a host of friends on Front street, and is regarded well by all 
classes of the community. The line of business will be the same 
as that of D. L. Beck & Sons, viz., wholesale grocers and commis- 
sion merchants. Associated with the new firm, which will be 
known as W. F. Beck & Co., 201 Front street, will be Edgar 
Cohen, of Costigan, Cohen & Co., and R. M. Simpson, who for 
the past six years occupied the onerous position of cashier to 
Beck & Sons. As his partners are men of great ability and ex- 
perience, there is no doubt that the firm will have a prosperous 
career. 



JUSTICE IN THE ANTIPODES. 



AN Australian Magistrate recently had a case of assault on a 
German brought before him, but remained puzzled for some 
time how to deliver his judgment. At length, clearing his throat, 
and with excessive dignity, he uttered this dictum: " Prisoner, if 
the assaulted individual had not been a German, but a French- 
man, Portuguese, Norwegian, or Italian, well and good — the 
Court might have dealt with you leniently; but we are on the 
eve of a European war, and if this man should complain to Bis- 
marck that he has received a black eye in a British colony, and 
the perpetrator of the outrage had not been severely punished, the 
alliance between two great nations might be endangered. You 
are fined two shillings and twopence." 

ST. MATTHEWS' HALL. 



The spring term of St. Matthews' Hall commenced last Thursday, 
when the Ninas vacation closed. This admirable school is in San 
Mateo County, and now enters upon the twenty-fourth year of its 
existence. It is under the management of the Rev. Alfred Lee 
Brewer, M.A., who has a deservedly high reputation as an educator, 
and who has turned out some of our foremost scholars. St. Mat- 
thews' Hall is conducted upon military principles, and the different 
grades are as carefully observed as in an array. This is of incalcula- 
ble benefit to the boys attending there, as it teaches them obedience 
to orders, regularity and tidiness. The school is supplied with gym- 
nasiums and playgrounds, and equal attention is paid to the develop- 
ment of the body as the mind. 

THERE was no better evidence of the prosperity of the city 
than the handsome New Year editions printed by the Chronicle 
and the Examiner. That of the Chronicle is especially valuable, as 
it gives the history of the State for the past forty years, showing 
what wonderful progress we have made. The Examiner's edition 
is marvelously clever, and both journals have to be complimented 
upon their issues. 

Gilmore's Celebrated Band uses the Decker Bros'. — the artists' — 
piano. Kohler & Chase sole agents, who sell at low prices and on 
easy terms. 



BALDWIN THEATRE-GRAND OPERA SEASON. 

Mr. Al. Havman, Lessee and Proprietor I AlfkbdBouvirr, Actlug Manager 
For Two Weeks onlj - < oiiimcurlnu Monday, .!■ nry 13tll, 

EMMA JUCH GRAND ENGLISH OPERA COMPANY. 

100 MEMBERS! 40 ORCHESTRA I 60 CHOIiUS! 

Conductor — Ad. Nri-kndorpp | Stage Director Emil Hahn 

(Under the direction of Chas. E. Locke). 

FOURTEEN PERFORMANCES OF GRAND OPERA IN ENGLISH. 

Repertoiri; for First Week : 

Monday. January 13th FAUST I Thursday M AR1TAN A 

Tuesday TKOYATOKE Friday CARMEN 

Wednesday MIGNON I Sat'day Matinee BOHEMIAN GIRL 

Saturday Evening FRE1SCHUTZ. 

Special.— Notwithstanding the expense incurred iu hriuging this Com- 
pany across the continent, the same prices will prevail as charged in New 
lork, Philadelphia and Boston. 

Best Reserved Seal* $», $1.50, $1. 

The Sale of Seats for first week will commence Monday, January 6th, 



NEW BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Leavitt. Lessee and Proprietor | J. J. Qottlob .... .... Manager 

The Reigning Favorite of the Comedy Stage, MISS VERNONA JARBEAU, 
in her Brilliant Musical Comedy, 

STARLIGHT! 

Replete with all the latest Opera Gems! Pretty Faces! Exquisite Toilets! 
Catchy Songs! Original Music! That's enough, don't you think? 

Matinee To-day al 2. 

Monday, January 13th-Last Week of Jarbeau. The New, Sparkling 
Mm ical Comedy, 
STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL! 

NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Handsomest Theatre in the World. 

Mr. Al Hayman, Lessee and Proprietor ] Mr. Harry Mann Manager 

Evening Prices— 25c, 60c, 75c, $1.00. All Reserved. 
Matinee To-day at 2.— 25c, 50c, 75c. Best Reserved Seats. 

The Great Boston Howard Athenseum Company. 

Seats for Rice's 

PEARL OF PEKIN 

now on sale. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

An Enthusiastic Success! MAGUIRE, RIAL & OSBOURNE'S DRAMATIC 
COMPANY, in 

HARBOR LIGHTS I 
One of the hest plays that has been seen at this house. A story teeming 
with excitement, and written iu dialogue much above that of the ordinary 
m elodr ama. 

g&- Prices— 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c and 75c. 

Monday, January 13th— 

HOODMAN BLIND! 

ALCAZAR THEATRE. 

Wallenrod & Stock well. Managers 

This (Saturday) Evening, January 11th, 

MANKIND! 

See the Tremendous Surge of the Angry Mob ! The Most Exciting and 
Realistic Scene ever Introduced in Drama. Although public interest in this 
great production continues undiminished, previous arrangements compel 
the management to announce the last week of tho famous melodramatic 
hit, "MANKIND. 

Best Seats— 25c, 50c and 75c. 

Monday, January 13th — 

SHADOWS OF A GREAT CITY! 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreling Bros Proprietors and Managers 

Last Week! The Great Event of the Season ! 

AIDAI • 

Monday, January 13tli— Theo. Vogt's Comic Opera, 

FURIOSA! 
Prices for Aida Only 75c, 50c and 25c. 

THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG, 

i Mi Market Corner Tentli Street, 

Is the most realistic and interesting Battle Scene ever produced. Read 
what General Howard and others say of it in our Catalogue. 

OPEN 9 a. M. to 11 p. M. _ 

~ flilMilTlir - ~ 

Furniture, Trunks, Pianos, Pictures, Carpets, stored and taken care of 
Having no rent to pay, we store goods low. Advances made. References 
dating back 21 years, given. 

H. WINDEL & CO.. 310 Stockton Street. 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

806 Market Street (I'helan Building). 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas forposy 
tively extracting teeth without pain. 



Colton Gas" has an established and 

unrivaled world-wide reputation for its purity, efficacy and perfect safety 
in all cases. Thirty-five thousand references. Established lt>63. Indorsed 
and recommended by all reputable dentists and physicians. Also performs 
all operations in dentistry. ^ CHARLEg ^ pECKEE . 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 1889. 




FL._ 
telegraphic columns of the daily newspapers, that some blue- 
blooded aristocrat or his spouse has embarked, or is about to 
embark, in the very uncongenial business of selling bonnets, 
haberdashery or clothing. The enterprise of the dailies in pro- 
viding such mental foreign pabulum for the edification of their 
weak-minded readers is highly commendable, and deserves to take 
rank among other stupendously expensive exploits of journalism. 
But it seems a little singular that while we are treated to copious 
details about some noble duke or duchess' business ventures, the 
daily press should keep so silent about the petty means some of 
our millionaires employ toward defraying their household ex- 
penses. For instance, it would be far more entertaining reading 
to learn why a certain millionaire will not allow eggs to be eaten 
on his premises, because, forsooth, each one is counted for sale — 
or, rather, the hens are — and if by any chance the number of eggs 
received, gathered and counted do not correspond with the num- 
ber of hens fed and roosted, there is such a merry combination of 
temper and distress on the part of the millionaire that each em- 
ploye" feels that he is suspected of having, sub rosa, enjoyed an 
egg with his matutinal coffee. Then, too, would not an article, 
artistically written by some of our poetical members of the Press 
Club, on the culture and sale of flowers by our wealthy dames 
and gentlemen, and the price fetched and the haggling gone 
through, be far more instructive and delightful than to learn of 
how the Duchess of Omnium Gatherum had opened a millinery 

shop in the West End ? 

# * # 

It was at the club, and he had been imbibing somewhat freely, 
spurred on to this pleasure by the fact that before the week came 
to a close he was to be united in the holy bonds of matrimony with 
the daughter'of a millionaire who has quite an extended reputa- 
tion for the performance of many charitable acts, about which the 
public have no intimation. He had been playing poker and the 
luck was against him, and paper, instead of coin, was tendered 
in payment. " When will these fall due? " was asked him. "Oh, 
sometime next week. I haven't got a bean with me to-night, but 
papa-in-law is rich, and he'll put up for me," and he looked wise- 
ly at the assembly, and hiccoughed himself out of the room. 

Two of our most prominent business men who live at Highland 
Park, met last Saturday afternoon at the Contra Costa Water 
Works to make complaint against the service. One of the gentle- 
men is a very big Insurance man, and has the title of " Gentle- 
man " generally put before his surname, which is decidedly of 
Welsh origin, though it is quite common in these United States, 
and in tact, in every country where the English language is com- 
mon. The other is a high official in a bank, and bears the name 
of one of our national heroes. The Scotchman came to complain 
against the speed his metre made, the other to ask why they did 
not put some one at the Highland Park reservoir to keep the 
young scoundrels from bathing in the water. The clerk looked 
blandly at the gentleman, whom we may as well call Jones, and 

said he did not believe that " any young scoundrels 

bathed in the reservoir," and that he must be misinformed. 
» .Not at all," said Jones; " my boys tell me that boys and young 
men go in the morning and take a dip, confound them! And the 
water is bad enough as supplied by the company, without those 
young imps washing in it." The clerk, though not believing that 
the Highland Park boys were hardy enough to bathe there on 
these stormy, cold mornings, reported the matter to his superiors, 
who put on a watchman. The vigil was rewarded, for about 5:30 
a. m. a young man came to the reservoir, calmly undressed, and 
was about to take a plunge, when the watcnman caught him and 
-said: "You young suicide, come along with me," and escorted him 
to the City Prison in Oakland. On investigation, the bold swim- 
mer proved to be Jones' son, Louis. Jones, on hearing of the 
arrest, drove furiously to Oakland in his buggy, swearing like a 
dozen troopers, and endeavored to make a compromise by offer- 
ing the Superintendent the best five-cent cigar he ever smoked if 
he would only hush the matter up. The Superintendent refused 
the rive-cent cigar, but finally concluded to let the matter drop. 
However, it is very certain that young Louis is cured of swim- 
ming in the Highland Park reservoir. 

THE Italian Government has just launched a new vessel, called 
the Partcnope. She is a small vessel of 850 tons, and carries 
eight guns, with a crew of ninety-three officers and men. Seven 
other vessels of the same type are in the course of construction. 

Sliainwald. Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-409 Montgomery street. 

The man who has never dined at the Maisou Riche, corner of 
Geary street and Grant avenue, does not know the meaning of the 
phrase " to dine." 



UNWORTHY JEALOUSY. 

THE exploit of the Examiner, in saving from certain death the 
fisherman who was cast upon Point Bonita Rock is an act 
worthy of the highest commendation, and to Allan Kelly and 
H. R. Haxton, the reporters, who faithfully carried out the orders 
of their chief no words of praise are sufficient. Mr. Hearst has, 
we understand, recognized their meritorious action by presenting 
each with a handsome gold watch and a sum of money. It would 
have been generally supposed that deeds like those which were 
performed last Friday night — the saving of a man from a horrible 
destruction — would have called forth tributes of praise from the 
other journals. But it was not so. With the exception of one 
evening paper, the dailies made no mention of the fact that the 
Examiner saved the man, and one paper was so contemptible as to 
even mis-state the name of the tug on which the Greek was brought 
safely home. There is nothing which so aggravates the daily 
press of this city as to be charged with provincialism, yet this 
treatment of fellow newspaper men and a contemporary amply 
proves that the dailies of San Francisco are governed by the petty 
jealousies which more properly belong to a village than a city 
which claims to be metropolitan in its habits and tastes. Despite 
the silence of the other papers the enterprise of the Examiner 
doing the work of the slothful alleged Life Saving service has been 
appreciated by the people of the State, and which, we trust, will 
be of material advantage to Mr. W. R. Hearst. 



" No," said the reverend priest from the interior, " I never drink 
on Sundays or holy days, but I feel more than sinful when I go to 
San Francisco." "And why?"asked a hairless youth. "'Because 
they keep, at the Grand Central Wine Rooms, 16-18 Third street, such 
splendid liquors that I cast good resolutions to the wind, and drink 
till I am full. That's why." 

MOET & CHANDON 



czhz^zmup^gkn-ju. 




"WHITE SEAL," Rich and Dry. 
"BRUT IMPERIAL," 

ACKNOWLEDGED 

THE FINEST 

BRUT "WIZN~:E 



IN THE WORLD. 



Sole Agents, 



Sherwood & Sherwood, 

212-214 Market Street, S. F. 

HIGHLAND BRAND MILK I 



THIS 035TXj"X" 

Absolutely Pure Condensed Milk in the Market 

A PERFECT SUBSTITUTE FOR 
I^UBSH MlliX OTZ. C K, E -A- *>/£ . 

THE BEST KNOWN FOOD FOR INFANTS. 

It contains no sugar or chemicals, but is simply pure cow's milk, 
and can be used the same as fresh milk for every purpose. 
For sale by all grocers and druggists. 

THE JOHN T. CUTTING CO., Sole Agents, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 






SAN FK Wi'lX'n NEWS I IT 111;. 



THE RAILROADS. 



THK hattlff between th« railroads end lha dementi is practically 
united. Tram* ire again In tuoiion on nil Ibe roada although 
v*-ry few of ibe through trains ere arriving "" time. At the 
placet where the roada were Injured by waahoate, landslides, and 
■O forth, temporary . ■ r been Uiti. and the work of re- 

pairing the-e breaks i> being vigorously proaecated. In a few 
days all trace of damage will have disappeared. It is estimated 
that the reeenl stornu have caused Injuries to the railroads in 
falifurnia to the amount «»f 1500,000. Several thousand extra 
workmen have been engaged in the past month, strengthening 
weak places and repairing breaks. In many instances, especially 
in tbeSontb, they would fix the road one day only to see their 
work undone on the next day. The struggle was continued, 
however, until success crowned the efforts of the companies. 

According to an Eastern paper there is said to be an unusual ex- 
odus of men, in all departments, from the railroad service at the 
present time. The reason assigned is the uncertainty of positions 
in the railroad service. In most cases the men going into other 
bnsiness are among the best in the employ of the roads. Such 
men watch for a business opening, and, when it is offered, take it 
without much parleying. Through consolidations and changes of 
managements it is estimated that fully 25 per cent, of the men in 
service on Indiana roads have been left out in the cold in the last 
eighteen months, although in most cases aa with the Big Four, 
the managements have retained in the service all the men they 
well could and not make the pay rolls too large. 



Another nucleus for a transcontinental railroad company has 
been formed. Articles of incorporation of the Pacific Railway 
Company have been filed. The company is quite modest, inas- 
much as its announced intention is simply to build a railroad 
from San Francisco to Spanishtown and Santa Cruz. Of the cap- 
ital stock of $3,000,000, the incorporators have paid in $97,500. 
This looks like business. The road, if built, will serve the west- 
ern portion of San Mateo county and the redwood lumber belt of 
Santa Cruz county, which ought to furnish considerable business, 
although the traffic is such that it would never stand very high 
rates. 

The Northern Pacific Railway has been notified that to do a 
bonded business between Eastern Canada and British Columbia it 
will have to obtain Canadian customs officials, and station them 
at alt transfer points west of Duluth, and pay their expenses. 
The railway has frequently to break the seals of cars containing 
bonded goods, and unless this is done in the presence of a Cana- 
dian official the goods will not be permitted to enter Canada. 

The most striking feature in the general growth of the Northern 
Pacific Railroad the past three years is the most extraordinary 
increase of its earnings from the transportation of passengers. In 
1886 the road carried an average of forty passengers to each train 
and in 1889 an average of sixty. The gross passenger receipts in- 
creased in three years from $3,000,000 to $6,000,000, or 100 per 
cent. 

News has been received that General Manager Towne is lying 
at the Windsor Hotel, in New York City, suffering from a severe 
attack of the prevailing malady — la grippe. He expected to have 
started for California last week, and just prior to his leaving he 
was seized. Just how ill Mr. Towne is, is not known on this side, 
but his many friends hope that the attack is not a serious one. 

The gross earnings of the Santa Fe for the second week of De- 
cember shows an increase of $27,743, compared with the corre- 
sponding period of last year. 

HORSE RAISING. 



AS we are indisputably a great horse-raising country, the fol- 
lowing from an English authority will be of interest to those 
who are interested in the enterprise of breeding animals for the 
market: It is a moot point whether horse-raising really contrib- 
utes to improve our breed of horses, but it is certain that very 
large prices have lately been given for some of our crack per- 
formers by agents of foreign countries, so we can count all our 
turf flyers as an appreciable item of the national wealth. It is 
Melton now that nas been sold by Lord Hastings for £10,000 to 
the Italian Government for the purpose of breeding cavalry horses. 
It was not long ago that Ormonde was exported to South America 
for the handsome return of £17,000 to the Duke of Westminister, 
who might have got more for him a few months before. 

California is undoubtedly the land of flowers, and there is nothing 
which creates so much enthusiasm among our visitors as our flora. 
It is owing to this that we have in our city florists who would make 
a reputation for their floral designs in any city in the world. Among 
them is Charles M. Leopold, of 35 Post street, whose windows are 
always bowers of beauty. His taste is so exquisite that be is always 
in demand, either for decorating rooms for entertainments or for 
making ornamental floral pieces. He has always the loveliest and 
freshest flowers at his store, and a visit to his-place is like a trip into 
a land which is never visited by " an eager and a nipping air." ^ 



A. de LUZE & FILS', 

BORDEAUX, 



St. Estephe, 
Pauillac, 

Brown Cantenac, 
St. Julien, 



Pontet Canet, 
Chat. Leoville, 
Chat. Larose, 
Chat. Paveil, 



Chat. Margaux, 
Chat. Beychevelle, 
Chat. Montrose, 
Chat. Lafite. 



FINE SAUTERNES. 

Sauternes SupV., Haut Sauterne*, Chateau Yquem. 

In Cases, Quarts aud Pints. 

C. MAREY h UGER BELAIR'S, 



NUITS, 

BURGUNDY WINES. 



Chambertin, 



Clos-Vougeot, 

In Cases, Quarts and Pints. 



Chablis (White). 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 

Sole Agents, 314 Sacramento Street. 

FINE FURNITURET 



We are in receipt of many novelties in odd 
pieces of FURNITURE, among which may be 
mentioned MAHOGANY, 

ANTIQUE OAK, 

And BRASS EASELS, LADIES' WRITING 
DESKS. PARLOR and MUSIC .ABINETS, 
FA^CY CHAIRS, ROCKERS, TABLES, 
SCREENS, PEDESTALS, BOOK CASES, etc. 

Late designs in PARLOR, DINING-ROOM, 
LIBRARY, CHAMBER arid HALL FURNITURE, 
BRASS BEDSTEADS in great variety. 

Sole Agents for the Welch Folding Beds. 

W. & J. SLOANE & CO., 

Carpets, Furniture and Upholstery, 
641-647 Market Street. 



Mackintoshed Coats & Cloaks 

—FOR— 

MEN AND WOMEN. 

GOODYEAR RUBBER CO. 

R. H. PcASE,Jr,) Agente . 

S. M. RUNYON, \ 
577 and 579 Market St., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



MILLBRAE DAIRY, 

THE MODEL DAIRY OF CALIFORNIA. 

P. H. GREEN, Proprietor. C. H. TILTON, Manager. 

PURE COUNTRY MILK AND CREAM 

Produced from healthy cows, wholesome feed, and rich pastures. Fresh 

from Millbrae, San Mateo Couuty, twice daily. Delivery 

to all parts of the city. 

The farm and city departments are open to inspection at all times 

Office and Depof : MISSION AND NINTH STREETS, 

Branches: Second and Mission Streets, Streets. 





10 



SAN FK AN CISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 18S0. 




PUGILISTIC— At this, the eleventh hour, it is still doubtful 
whether the Murphy-Weir battle will take place. It is 
booked for Monday next at the California Athletic Club, and un- 
der ordinary circumstances and with the usual run of fighters it 
would be pretty certain to come off then, but with two such er- 
ratic individuals as the Belfast and Sydney spiders, there is no 
telling what may take place between now and then to prevent 
their rencontre. 

The latest reports from training quarters are that Murphy is in 
excellent condition, his few gunshot wounds received a few 
weeks ago, having healed up all right. Weir, who listened to the 
severe admonition of President L. R. Fulda regarding his inclina- 
tion to shirk severe training has been working himself into good 
trim ever since, and is "fit" all excepting the ringer through 
which sped a bullet from his parlor rifle about a month ago. The 
wound has healed completely, but has left the finger quite stiff, 
with a disinclination to bend into position when the fist is closed. 
It is probable that the Belfast man will break that digit during the 
fight, but it is just as certain that lie will not notice a little thing 
like that during the heat of the fray. As to the probabilities of 
the fight, there is but one thing that can be said with safety ; it 
will be a good one. Each man feels that the other is in his way, 
not only as possessing the title of featherweight champion of the 
world, but as to his claim of being the most eccentric individual 
in the prize ring of this day. Each has made such disparaging 
remarks about the other that the other is full of venom, and it is 
a question which of the two has the greater desire to mop the 
California Athletic Club-ring up with his opponent. As far as 
foretelling which will succeed in his desire there is but to cal- 
culate basing one's opinion on what each man has been seen to 
do. Weir has come here with a great reputation. He has never 
been whipped and when he was not the victor he made his bat- 
tles a draw. He is said to be able to keep away from those he 
finds he cannot whip. However, he has never done anything 
here on which his merits can be judged, and our experience with 
eastern fighters who have come here in the past few years, does 
not warrant such reputations being taken seriously. On the 
other hand, Murphy has had two great fights on this coast. He 
whipped Griffin whose reputation was about equal to Weir's. He 
did him up in such handsome style that there is no questioning 
the fact that he can hit harder than men usually can in his class. 
In his second battle with Murphy, the English champion, he 
showed not only that he was clever, but that he was a thoroughly 
game man. With both hands broken beyond further use, he 
fought on until it was necessary to call the mill a draw. The 
Englishman, although still in possession of a good hand and an- 
other that was but slightly damaged, was fought to a standstill. 
Under the circumstances, Murphy does look like the winner in 
the coming fight, but it is a hard thing to fortell results nowa- 
days after such surprises as the Le Blanche-Dempsey and the 
Jimmy Murphy-Jones surprises. 

There seems to be much criticism on the Jim Corbett-Campbell 
set-to for points up north. The Oregonian had the worst of the 
contest until the last few rounds when he outscored his oppo- 
nent ten to one. There is just a possibility that Corbett did not 
give up his lucrative billet at the Olympic club to go into profes- 
sional service for his health. Campbell's reputation was not the 
best as a boxer, after Jack Dempsey did him up in three rounds, 
and when Corbett went North with his big reputation as an equal 
to Jack Burke, the victor of Joe Choynski and an aspirant to 
box Peter Jackson, of course all the Web-foot money went on 
Corbett. There must have been a goodly sum lost on that con- 
test and the question is: Did Corbett quit any loser besides in 
reputation ? There seems to be no douhj; that Campbell could 
have whipped Corbett had they been matched to a finish. 

Jack McAulilfe, the champion light-weight of America, will 
be here in a few days to sign and prepare himself for his battle 
with Jimmy Carroll, the teacher of boxing at the California 
Athletic Club. Billy Madden, the man who taught John L. 
Sullivan what he knows of sparring, will manage McAulilfe. 
Madden will probably take Joe McAulilfe, California's heavy- 
weight, in tow to New York, and instruct him, that he may be a 
credit to this State. 

The latest news regarding pugilism among the big ones, is the 
cable from London, to the effect that the Pelican Club members 
are getting up a big purse for a battle between Sullivan and 
Slavin. These club men are so thoroughly disgusted with the 
way in which the Slavin-Smith affair was conducted, under Eng- 
lish guidance, that they propose to have the fight take place in 
America. 

Peter Jackson will leave Liverpool in a few days now. He will 
reach New York about the 2uth inst., but it is not certain when 
he will get here. There is no doubt but what the dusky Austra- 
lian will linger in the East for a few months, picking up the dollars 
that thousands of people will pay to see him spar. By the time 
his boom will " peter " out he will, no doubt, get back here and 
urge on his controversy with John L. Sullivan. 



Already the members of the California Athletic Club are work- \ 
ing up the annual election excitement. No tickets have yet been 
presented, but there is no question but what the regular one with 
L, R. Fulda at its head will, as usual, carry the day. Fulda has 
served two terms, and has made a most acceptable President. He 
has not only devoted more time and energy than any other eligible 
man could to the Club, but he has carried all the burden incidental 
to an institution of the kind, which, from nothing three years 
ago, has been pushed to the front in the athletic circles of the 
world. Fulda's position in the mercantile world is such that his 
name at the head of the Club has been a guarantee that the busi- 
ness end of the institution was all right, and his thorough knowl- 
edge of sports has steered the Club comparatively clear of all those 
disheartening fiascos that have lately brought other clubs under 
the ban of disapproval. There is some talk of placing R. B. 
Mitchell in opposition to Fulda. There is no question but what 
the attorney would make a conscientious President, but it is also 
certain that while he would deliver the ring side-speeches with 
more eloquence than the present executive, he would be thorough- 
ly inefficient to guide such an organization as the C. A. C. It is, 
however, almost an assured fact that R. B. Mitchell would not 
accept a nomination as against L. R. Fulda. 

BASEBALL. — There will be no regular games of baseball played 
in this city until the next championship season opens, which 
will probably be March 30th. The California League should have 
held its annual meeting last Wednesday. As two of the Directors 
were unable to be present, the President adjourned the meeting 
until to-night, at the Golden Eagle Hotel, in Sacramento. The 
most important business to come before the meeting will be 
whether the franchise of Stockton will be renewed or transferred 
to San Jose. The city making the most promising financial show- 
ing for next season will receive it. San Jose has grounds leased, 
but not yet built upon, and a few players engaged. Stockton has 
suitable grounds, some players engaged, and an agent in the East 
in pursuit of players. The Stockton club seems to have a little 
advantage, which will probably continue her in the League next 
season. San Jose, however, can keep the interest alive by hav- 
ing visiting clubs play there, and be strong enough to force her 
way into the League next year: and should affairs get along 
smoothly in Fresno, the chances are favorable for that city being 
in the League also next year. With five clubs it is impossible to 
arrange a satisfactory schedule, while with a league of even num- 
bered clubs, there is comparatively little difficulty, the only con- 
troversy being as to which clubs shall get the choice of dates. 

At present Sacramento is the only club having a full nine. San 
Francisco has five, with more to hear from. Oakland is reticent 
as to whom she has signed outside of the two O'Neils, McDonald 
and Long. 

There will be four games played every week next season. This 
will give the players plenty of practice and keep them in good 
condition. 

When Jim Hart left here he said it was his last year in base 
ball. As sure as the tax gatherer is around next year Jim will be 
here next winter with a team. Jim has a great social and finan- 
cial liking for this city, for which he has good reasons. 

FINE ARTS 

AT AUCTIOIT! 

We have received Instructions from the Messrs. 
DEAKIN BROS. & CO., who are about retiring 
from the retail business and continuing there- 
after only in the wholesaling of Japanese 
goods, to offer at public sale on MONDAY and 
TUESDAY, January 13th and 14th, at their sales- 
room, No. 33 Post Street, under the Mechanics' 
Institute, their Magnificent collection of European Oil 

Paintings, Foreign Water Colors, Choice Etchings and Superb Japan- 
ese Curios. 

The cata'ogue is one of the finest collections of Gems OF 
Art ever offered in this city, the selections having been made 
and purchased under instructions from Messrs. Deakin 
Bros. & Co., by one of the best art connoisseurs of the 
United States 

Catalogues are now ready and the goods exposed for ex- 
hibition at the Art Rooms, No. 33 Post Street, near Kearny. 

The sale will be open on Monday, January 13th, at 12 
o'clock noon, and will continue for two days. 

Easton, Eldridge & Co., 

Auctioneers, 618 Market St. 



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8AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



BUSINESS BLOCKS OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
Artotype N< • Plate 29. 

Pun Nation a i Bask BotLDmo, 

Wrtsenl ihia week ■ double-page artotype of this handsome 
new structure, of which it i-- not too much to say that in 
construction and <Ie?ign it mark? a new era in our architecture. 
It is located at the corner "f Bash and Sansome streets, and but 
one block from Market street. No expense was spared upon its 
construction, and everything was done to make it convenient and 
commodious. It lias an artistic exterior, and the materials em- 
ployed in it are pressed brick and gr:iy granite. The first story 
and basement are entirely of the latter material. The feature of 
the basement is a splendid safe deposit vault belonging to the 
bank. This, unlike most sub-stories, is well lighted and hand- 
somely finished, with a tiled and mosaic floor and a high ceiling, 
fitted up in an elegant manner for the transaction of the safe de- 
posit branch of the batik's business. We describe elsewhere in 
detail the magnificent safe deposit vault, which has no superior 
in this country. The entrance to the bank is at the corner of Bush 
and Sansome streets. The architect has been allowed some lati- 
tude in the matter of the decorations here, which are exceedingly 
tasteful. The archway is surmounted by the national bird, flanked 
by two well-modeled California bears, supporting the national 
emblem in the form of a shield, upon which is the motto of Cali- 
fornia. Massive oaken doors give entrance to the banking-room, 
which is finished throughout in the same wood, relieved by grill- 
work of Bower-Bartf charcoal iron in striking and tasteful de- 
signs. The counters are in the form of a horseshoe, the President's 
office being immediately at the left of the main entrance. An 
electric bell register just behind this gentleman's chair enables 
him, at a touch of the finger, to connect himself with a dozen or 
more points of importance, both in and outside of the building. 
The floor is of tesselated tiles, and the ceiling is handsomely pan- 
eled and frescoed, the entire design and arrangement of the large 
banking-room being tasteful, handsome and harmonious. A 
private stairway at the rear leads to the directors' and committee 
rooms, which form a suite by themselves in the rear of the second 
story. Regarding the financial standing of the institution, it is 
only necessary to say that during the year just closed a dividend 
of eight per cent, was paid its stockholders, and a surplus of 
$200,000 added to its already large reserve — a record which few 
banks in the country can show. The entrance to the building 
proper is on Sansome street. Here may be found an elevator of 
the latest approved pattern, enclosed in a strikingly handsome 
grill-work cage, giving rapid transit to the floors above. These 
are five in number, finished throughout in white oak, the walla 
being stained a terra-cotta color, and relieved by unburnished door, 
window and gas fittings of charcoal iron. 

A separate gas and electric service is furnished to each story, 
combined wfth the most thorough and convenient sanitary ar- 
rangements. The building is fitted throughout for both gas and 
electric service, and is thoroughly fire-proof. It is a model mod- 
ern structure, reflecting the greatest credit on the enterprise of the 
institution to whose successful career it is a mostworthy monu- 
ment. 

New York Life Insurance Company. 

The entire second floor, immediately over the bank's quarters, is 
occupied by that splendid organization, the New. York Life Insur- 
ance Co. The record of the sterling success of this Company dur- 
ing the past quarter century is almost without parallel in the an- 
nals of life insurance. It is one of the great Companies of the 
United States, with assets and surplus aggregating 110 millions, 
and a yearly business commensurate with these figures. There 
are few Companies which can approach the New York Life, either 
in the volume of business done, or the soundness and conserva- 
tism of its business methods. It is managed at home by some 
of the greatest names in the Life Insurance world, at the head of 
whom is that star of the first magnitude, Wm. H. Beers. It is 
none the less fortunate in its Pacific Coast representative, Mr. 
Alex. G. Hawes, of whom it is enough to remark that in his hands 
the business of the Compaay here has quite kept pace with its 
splendid record in the East, and all over the country. The Com- 
pany is fittingly housed in the handsome and commodious offices 
it now occupies, than which no surer sign of its spendid progress 
could be given. 

The Home Benefit Life and Home Accident Association, 
occupy handsome quarters in this building, were incorporated 
under the laws of this State in 18S0, and have made steady pro- 
gress ever since, by reason of the conservative policy of the man- 
agement. Both Associations are managed by representative San 
Francisco men. The Life Association has paid over $500,000. 
in losses promptly and in full, and the Accident Association has 
met and paid in full all liabilities to the amount of over $250,000. 
The plan under which policies are written are approved by 
the most eminent Insurance men in thi3 country. It is strictly 
mutual, and all accumulations reverting to their respective policy 
holders. The plan is a common-sense plan in the fullest meaning 
of the words, and all insurance is sold at about one-half of the 
rates charged by the old-line companies. 



WlLSHIRK SAFK AND SCALE Co. 

This well-known firm hail the contract for the magnificent safe 
deposit vault in Ihc new First National Hank building, one of the 
'"">« important pieces of fire and burglar-proof work yet built on 
this coast. The dimensions of this splendid .strong-box are 2-i ft. 
10 in. long by 19 ft. 4 in. wide, and 10 ft. high. There is a clear 
space about three sides of this vault. The interior is 10 ft. in. 
Ion- by 14 ft. wide, and 8 ft. b" in. high. The inside wall consists 
of half-inch alternate plates of chrome steel and wrought iron, to 
a total thickness of 2£ in. These are welded together from the 
inside in a manner which defies the most skillful cracksman. 
Next to these is a Finch brick wall, after which comes a 4 in. air 
chamber, setting the fire demon at defiance. The outer wall is of 
brick, to the thickness of 15 in., the exterior casing being a half- 
inch plate of cast-iron. There are two entrances at the center, 
front and rear, each being fitted with massive double doors for 
protection, and an inside grill-work door for light and air during 
business hours. The outer doors are 3£ inches thick, of welded 
chrome steel and wrought iron, to combine strength and tough- 
ness. The inner door is 2£ in. in diameter. Each door is provided 
with a double combination lock, the outer door being also pro- 
tected by a Sargent & Greenleaf time lock. A massive screw 
attached to the outer doors forces them into air-tight proximity 
to the walls of the vault, which makes the introduction of any 
explosive substance absolutely impossible. This building rests 
upon a foundation built down to tide-water, and capable of stand- 
ing not only the heaviest strain, but the severest shock. The 
whole work reflects the greatest credit on its builders, who may 
be called the only distinctively Pacific Coast firm in this line. 

Henley, Swift & Rigby. 
The front suite of offices on the fifth floor is occupied by the 
representative law firm of Henley, Swift & Rigby. The senior 
member of this firm is well known as a successful lawyer, and as 
having served the State in Congress for two terms from the First 
District. Mr. C. J. Swift is not only acknowledged an able and 
successful lawyer, but as the organizer and Secretary of the Cali- 
fornia State Bar Association. Mr. Rigby settled here two years 
ago, after a long and valuable experience in the law courts of 
England and New Zealand. The firm occupies a high position at 
the bar, both on account of its ability and success in litigation as 
the personal character of its members. 

Messrs. Cross & Denson, 
Attorneys-at-law, occupy a handsome suite of offices on the fifth 
floor of the building. Mr. C. W. Cross was for several years in 
practice at Nevada City, and was one of the leading lawyers in 
that section of the State, particularly in mining and corporation 
litigation. Since removing to San Francisco he has been largely 
engaged in the same line of practice. He was a member of the 
convention which framed the new State Constitution, and served 
for four sessions as State Senator. Judge S. C. Benson was for 
many years District, and afterwards Superior Judge at Sacra- 
mento, and has long been recognized as the principal attorney of 
the leading corporations and mining interests there. 

* * # * 

The entire fourth floor is occupied by the law offices of the re- 
presentative firm of Olney, Chickering & Thomas. Doyle, Gal- 
pin & Zeigler, occupying the 3rd floor, are an old and well-known 
firm of attorneys. Their large practice, which is wholly of a civil 
nature, extends from 1851, when the senior member of the firm 
first located in San Francisco. They have been, and still are con- 
nected with much of the most important litigation with which 
the records of our courts are filled; land litigation, probate mat- 
ters, and suits arising out of business relations mainly occupy 
their attention. 




A Homeopathic Family Medicine Case should be in Every Household. 

Prices, from $6 to $45, Including Book. 
BOERICKE & SCHRECK, 

Catalogue ma iled free. 234 Suiter Street, San Francisco. Cal. 

A. LUSK & CO., 

SAN FEANCISC0. 
Packers of the following celebrated brands: 
A. LUSK BEAR BRAND, 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY, 

SAN LORENZO PACKING CO 



1? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, M 



PHOTOGRAPHY VERSUS ART. 

AND now it is said that the discoveries made by photography 
of a horse when running, or of a man when walking, or in any 
other action, will be of no avail to Art, for Art cares not for things 
as they are, but for things as they seem. No painter would dare 
be so courageous as to represent his figures in the absurd antics 
that photography reveals as the actual movements made by man 
or animal in motion Fears of a complete upheaval in Art mat- 
ters seemed imminent when the new discovery was first made. 
The old masters had received a complete snub at the hands of the 
all-perceiving ray of light which would not He. All their grace- 
ful svolutions of horse and master in action were proved to be in- 
correct, and their inferiority, in the light of the present, clearly 
proved. But the much talked-of revolution in Art has settled 
down into a very small corner. Art has met the foe and ignored 
him. For it appears that Art has no use for a horse all tied up 
in a knot when he takes a fence, for no human eye has ever per- 
ceived this evolution. By some queer process the eye perceives 
a combination of movements in such rapid succession that they 
become telescoped — making a composit action, as it were. This 
being the way it seems to the human intelligence, why degrade 
Art by dragging in a realism which is absolutely unrecognizable? 
Therefore, the fiat has gone forth, and man will continue to be 
new in the graceful manner patented by the ancients, and the 
animal kingdom will do the same. Napoleon will continue to 
cross the Alps old style, and no tied-up-in-a-knot animal will 
bring " Sheridan twenty miles away." And the Ancient smiles 
in his sleeve, and Art breathes freely once more. 

All of which goes to show that that which seems, is of far more 
importance than that which is. Endowed with a limited five 
senses which only partly perceive, and then half the time incor- 
rectly, we are living in a world of enchantment. We boldly speak 
of the sun as yellow, when in reality it is a brilliant blue, like any 
flame, it is the burning oxygen around the flame only that we 
perceive. We confidently believe that we seethe objects them- 
selves which are around us, when in reality there was never a 
human eye in the world which rested on the real object. It per- 
ceives only the tiny reflection of the object, compressed into the 
space of a pin-point. It may be a magnificent distance of hun- 
dreds of miles, neverthless, it is contracted into this tiny space 
for the intelligence to perceive as in a mirror. The real object has 
never been met face to face. We think that sound exists inde- 
pendent of man. On the contrary, if there were no ear there 
would be no sound. That is merely the way the intelligence 
translates the mighty commotion around him. The noise is in 
the ear itself. We believe the visible objects around us, such as 
houses, trees, furniture, etc., to be solid, simply because they seem 
so, while in reality they are molecular in structure, composed of 
particles scarcely touching each other. With an added sense, 
that of magnetic sight, we should perceive how semi-transparent 
the whole world is. What wonder, living in such a universe, 
with such a law as this in effect, that man should apply it in fact 
to the methods of life in general! What wonder that he buys 
land, mortgages it up to the ears, lives in luxury, pays no bills, 
and has a grand time generally? It is far more in consonance 
with this queer world of ours that he should seem to be rolling in 
wealth than that such should be the fact, and not seem so. What 
wonder that woman arrays herself in garments of splendor, decks 
herself with jewels, and makes improvements on nature, tinting 
her cheeks a delicate carmine, penciling her brows a vivid black, 
coating it all over with a brilliant white, and dying her hair a 
gorgeous sunset hue — she is merely following the law of earth. 
To seem to be a beauty is of far more importance than to be 
beautiful. 

And yet, there is a revolt against this enchanted idea of things. 
There is a cry in the nature of man for the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth. Enchantment or reality, things which 
seem or things which are, there are some natures in the highest 
state of progress, pressing on determined to learn the truth, no 
matter how brutal it is, for the truth is ever brutal. They are not 
dazzled by the apparent wealth, they are not charmed by the 
painted beauty — they look through the shams mercilessly, and 
point the finger of scorn. But this is Science, and not Art. 

INDIA to England in fourteen days! This is not a Jules Verne's 
romance, but an established fact, says an English paper. For 
the first time in the history of the British Postoitice, or any other, 
for the matter of that, the Indian mails have been delivered in 
London under fourteen days. This marvelous expedition — for 
marvelous it is when we recall the fact that the contract time for 
delivery of the mails only a few years ago was twenty days — was 
due to the splendid steaming qualities of the Oceana, the vessel of 
the Peninsular and Oriental fleet which took Prince Albert Victor 
out to India. It reached Suez under eight days, and covered the 
whole distance to Brindisi in twelve davs fifteen hours, thus 
maintaining an average speed of nearly 400 knots per day, in- 
cluding stoppages at intermediate ports (Aden and Suez) and de- 
tention in the Suez Canal. 



At Moraghan's, in the California Market, oysters can be purchased 
more cheaply than at any other place in the city. Go there and try 
them. 



AN UNWELCOME PROPHECY. 

PROFESSOR FLOWER, the director of the British Museum, has 
just shown that the seals in the Behring Sea will soon be ex- 
tinct. Surely it is possible for the various European Govern- 
ments to take action in this matter. Perhaps some day an en- 
terprising northern nation will take up "seal cultivation," just 
as in Africa and Australia they are successfully carrying on os- 
trich farming. There is no reason why a seal rookery should not 
pay as well as an ostrich farm, or the cultivation of sheep and 
cattle. Anyhow, as seals decrease in numbers in their natural 
state, their genuine skins must become more expensive. Perhaps 
that will only tend to increase their charm among some people. 
But the fur trade, like the ivory trade, is seriously threatened 
through the greediness of those who live by it. 

— London Court Journal. 

CATARRH. 

Catarrhal Deafness— Hay Fever— A New Home Treatment.— Suf- 
ferers are not generally aware that these diseases are contagious, or 
that they are due to the presence of living parasites in the lining mem- 
brane of the nose and Eustachian tubes. Microscopic research, how- 
ever, has proved this to be a fact, and the result of this discovery is 
that a simple remedy has been formulated whereby catarrh, catarrhal 
deatness and hay fever are permanently cured in from one to three 
simple applications made at home by the patient once in two weeks. 
N. B.— This treatment is not a snuff or an ointment; both have been 
discarded by reputable physicians as injurious. A pamphlet ex- 
plaining this new treatment is sent on receipt of stamp by A. H. 
Dixon & Son, 337 and 339 West King street, Toronto, Canada. 

— Christian Standard. 

Sufferers from Catarrhal troubles should carefully read the above . 

:b^zt>t:k:s. 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 

WM. ALVORD, President. 
Thomas Beown. Cashier | B. Murray, Jr .. .Assistant Cashier 

AQENT8: 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank: CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Saving Bank: NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent 
In London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild it Sons. Correspondents in India, 
China, Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver. Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, London. Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankfort-on-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong. 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland- 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

DEPOSIT VAULTS, 
\. U . (or. Jiusli and Sanyome Stst., San Francisco, < al. 

Safes to rent from $5 to $100 per annum (under the exclusive control of the 
renter) for the care of Stocks, Bonds, Valuable Papers and Jewelry. 
Trunks, packages of silverware, bric-a-brac, etc,, taken on storage, at 
moderate rates, aud fur long or short terms. 

Special deposits of coin, bullion, stocks or bonds, taken by the mouth or 
year. 

A specialty made of the care of wills, and any instructions regarding 
their disposition upon the death of the testator faithfully carried out. 
S. G. MURPHY .President [JAMES K. LYNCH -Manager. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. w. Cop. Sansome and. Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital. $2,500,000 \ Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $350,000. 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.), No. 10 Wall St., N Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cle. 17Boule- 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com- 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. DAVID CAHN, > ,, 

EUGENE MEYER, I Mana gers. 
C. Altrchpl, Cashier. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

Agency at New Yoek 62 Wall Street 

Agency at Virginia. Nevada. 

London Bankers Union Bank of London (Limited) 

DIRECTORS: 

JAMES L. FLOOD President 

JNO. W. MACK »> , A. E. DAVI8, R. H. FOLLIS, J. P. BIGELOW. 



THE GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 626 California Street. San Francisco 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND $ 1,065,000 00. 

Deposits July 1st, 1889 19.640.822 34. 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KB, USE ; 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT ; 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Chas. Meiuecke, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. 
Van Bergen, E. Meyer, O. Schoemaun, B. A. Becker. Attorneys. J arboe, 
Harrison and Goodfellow. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President I ERNST BRAND Secretary 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. 



NEWS LETTER. 




i:. 



SPEAK. YE FOUR. WHERE DO YE DWELL?— Academy. 

Fire so wild, where shall we find thee? 
■• In the valley seek it rook. 

Strike with steel, and at the shock 
In a mon.ent outspring I, 
There the bed wherein I lie. 
There seek and you shall find me." 

Air, light air, where shall we find thee? 
• Where leaflets tremble on the tree, 
Where the curling smoke you see, 
Where the down floats north or south, 
'Tis the breathing of my mouth. 
There seek and you shall find me." 

Water bright, where shall we find thee? 
" Mighty mountains cannot hide 
Flow of spring and force of tide; 
Where the roots of rushes grow 
You will find me: dig below, 
There seek and you shall find me." 

Holy truth, where shall we find thee? 

" Through the weary world 1 roam, 

No house have I, no place, no home. 

I knock, I call, but none reply, , 

Therefore heavenward I must fly: 

There seek and you shall find me." 



GOLD AND GRAY.— London World. 



Gray on the dull horizon, dimmer gray 

Clutching with clammy fingers at the gold, 

Hung 'mid the undergrowth, or on the wold, 

"Where fading ferns, gaudy in death's array, 

Bow their sad heads as autumn turns away. 

Now doth gray fog the beechen wood enfold, 

Till gold seems silver, glistening, pale and cold, 

And gold and gray are one this piteous day. 

A stir among the trees, the wind's astir, 

The wan mist, rising, fades away and sighs, 

The golden leaves drift through th' enfranchised air, 

Each one that falls re-opening golden skies, 

Save where among the silence of yon fir 

Pale winter wakes, and autumn slowly dies. 



EVENING. — A. Lampman, in Scribner's Magazine. 

From upland slopes I see the cows file by 

Lowing, great-chested, down the homeward trail, 
By dusking fields and meadows shining pale 

With moon-tipped dandelions; flickering high 

A peevish night-hawk in the western sky 
Beats up into the lucent solitudes 
Or drops with griding wing; the stilly woods 

Grow dark and deep, and gloom mysteriously. 

Cool night-winds creep and whisper in mine ear; 
The homely cricket gossips at my feet; 

From far-off pools and wastes of reeds I hear 

With ebb and change the chanting frogs break sweet 

In full Pandean chorus; one by one 

Shine out the stars, and the great night comes on. 

SUNRISE IN JANUARY.— Tinsley y s Magazine. 

They miss this glorious sight 
Who still upon the pillow rest their head, 
That first long ray upslanting rosy red 

From clouds of night. 

Then, like a burnished shield, 
The sun's broad disc mounts in the purple sky; 
White, white as virgin snow, the hoar frosts lie 

On street and field. 



ZB^JSTIECS. 



CAPITAL PAID UP. 
RESERVE FUND . 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. 



$2,500,000 
575,000 



THE FARMER.— New York Herald. 



None can dispute that the farmer is blessed 

In true independence of labor. 
His food doesn't depend on the whim of mankind. 

Like that of his mercantile neighbor. 

God in his goodness looks down from above 
And paternally gives him his bread — 

Provided he works eighteen hours every day, 
And devotes only six to his bed. 



Capi tal Authorized $6,000,000 I Paid up 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund. . 



Southeast corner California and SanBom9 Streets. 
Head Office— 28 CORNHILL, London. 

Branches— Victoria, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon ; Seattle and Tacoma, 
Washington. 

Sub-Branches— New Westminster, Vancouver, Nanaimo and Kamloops, British 
Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub 
Ject to Check, aud Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office aud Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO aud CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bauk; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA aud JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, AustrPlia and China; AUSTRALIA aud NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial BankiugCompauyof Sydney, English, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bank aud National Bank of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD {West Indies)-Colonial Bank. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

f ESTABLISHED IN 1870.1 
UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY. 

CAPITAL STOCK PAID UP $I,50C,^00 

SURPLUS $300,000 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 162,974- 452,974 

DIRECT0R8 : 

3. G. Murphy, James Moffitt, George C. Perkins, Geo. A. Low, James M. 

Douahue, James D. Phelau, N. Van Bergen, Jas. H. Jennings, J. A. Hooper. 

President S. G. MURPHY I Cashier E.D.MORGAN 

Vice-President . .JAMES MOFFITT | Ass't Cashier ... GEO. W. KLINE 
Transacts a general banking business. Issues Commercial aud Travelers' 
Credits. Buys aud Sells Exchange ou London, Dublin, Paris, the principal 
cities of Germany and the United States. Collections made and prompt 
returns rendered at market rates of exchange. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

... $1,500,000 

650,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel Court, Loudon, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligmau & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bauk transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, aud issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world, ^euds bills for collection, loaus money, buys and sells exchauge 
and bullion. FRED. F. LOW, I ManftE , prB 

IGN. STEINHART.l managers. 
P. N. Liliknthal, Cashier. - 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Capital and Reserve, $2,415,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. | London Office ... 73 Lombard Sl>, E. C. 

Portland Branch. 48 First St. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, William Steel. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan & Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets, $19,724,638.46. 

President, BENJAMIN P. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENS. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 

324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $800,000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary 8. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. S. JONES | Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL 11,000,000. 

DIRECTORS : 
CHAS. E. CROCKER, I E. H. MILLER, JR. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH ..Pbesident. 

W E BROWN Vice-Pkesident. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashieb. 

WELLS, FARGO & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,694,8C5.04 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford Chas. F. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris. Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, Issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Ban kin 
Business. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 1890. 




SANCHO PANZA and his ass couid not have been more de trop 
in a company of dignified merchant travelers than "Lord ' Lloyd 
was on the occasion of the recent trip to the Candelaria mine of 
Durango, Mexico. From the start the American contingent was 
bored to death by the fulsome efforts of this obsequious individual 
to worm his way into the good graces of Macdonald Cameron, or 
" Sir Donald," as he was dubbed in order to give tone to the asso- 
ciation. The servility displayed on every opportunity was in- 
tensely amusing at times; the sotto voce admonitions "to see that 
1 Sir Donald ' wants for nothing; never let him have to ask for 
anything, but divine his requirements and satisfy them immedi- 
ately," being generally accompanied by furtive twitches of any 
available portion of the victim's anatomy, and a series of panto- 
mimic gesticulations that would upset the professional gravity of 
a circus clown. The descendants of Castilian nobles, as they an- 
athematized the long-suffering burro, must at the same time have 
invoked the names of their patron saints in maledictions loud and 
deep on a tormentor who perpetually outraged their sense of dig- 
nified repose. The journey down the coast consumed the greater 
part of eight days, instead of four, the usual time allotted for the 
trip. Every morning, when a shady spot was reached, the com- 
pany was halted and informed that " ' Sir Donald ' would shave." 
Valises were unpacked, and the ceremony proceeded, with a frigid 
dignity which simply overawed the impatient spectators. If there 
was no water convenient, it had to be found, if the neighborhood 
had to be searched for miles around. 
$$ $ 

THE attentions were a littie too pressing, however, for even an 
Englishman to put up with for any length of time, mixed up 
as they were with a nauseating dose of ancestral reminiscences, 
and when Mazatlan was reached an open rupture took place, 
which resulted in a mutual vow between " Lord Lloyd " and his 
" Sir Donald " never to speak again under any circumstances. 
On his arrival at the seaport, Lloyd in search of new worlds to 
conquer, and armed with the ponderous volume in which are 
given in detail unequalled even by the book of Genesis, the lives 
of his warlike ancestors, invaded the sanctum of Don Echiguren, 
the wealthy banker. A point blank refusal to peruse the histori- 
cal narrative, for the reason that it lacked in interest, sent Lloyd 
to the right about in high dudgeon. That evening some English 
naval officers were dined and wined, and as usual the leading 
topic of discussion was » me fam'ly." Cameron was taunted on 
his inability to rake up a belted knight among the shades of his 
ancestors, and he in turn retaliated with a few remarks on 
Lloyd's personality which worked him into a fearful passion. 
" Don't talk to me like thai you how'id cweatuah," he shrieked. 
'• Don't, now, I say, or positively I shall leave the woom." This 
he finally concluded to do, on a gentle hint from the irate 
Scotchman, who by this time had worked himself up to a fight- 
ing pitch. The next morning Cameron took the steamer for 
San Francisco after notifying the " Lord " never to speak to him 
again, and so ended the short-lived partnership. This also ac- 
counts for the arrival of the Hamilton clique on a later steamer, 
much to the surprise of parties here who believed that the ut- 
most harmony prevailed on all sides. 
S S S 

THE owners of the Candelaria mine of Mexico are now between 
the devil and the high sea. Hamilton has got a kind of a half 
promise that he should have a bond, while "Lord Lloyd cannot 
see why the dooce a fellah should be ignoa'd in such a beastly 
way, ye know." His presumption is based on an alleged sale of 
the Mulatos mine, which Hayward & Hobart are generally sup- 
posed to have carried through in Dondon on their own account. 
The way the matter now stands is thaULloyd will be given his 
walking papers, and allowed to air his genius in some secluded 
portion of Great Britain. When Mr. Mackay returns to the Pa- 
cific Coast, J. L. Low and Pat Kerwin, two of the experts retained 
by the bonanza firm, will go down and examine the property. If 
their report is favorable, Mackay and Flood will purchase an in- 
terest in the mine and manage its affairs. In this case Union Gold 
Hamilton will be able to dispose of his maps at a profit. The re- 
port he can place on file, or give it to Lloyd as a memento. 
** % 

IT is about time that the mining men throughout this State, 
organized for self defence. Every other industry is protected 
in its rights by the combination of all who are interested. A de- 
termined attempt is now being made to ruin the miner and drive 
him out of a lucrative employment, without the slightest effort 
being made to repel the attacks. The Federal Courts having 
closed down the leading hydraulic mines, are now engaged in do- 
ing all in their power to interfere with the development of quartz 
ledges. A recent decision threatens the existence of miners in 
Nevada and Placer counties, and if the opening wedge is once 
driven, it is difficult to say where the trouble will end. The 
wholesale merchants andiron founders of this city have as much 
if not more at stake in this matter as the mine owners. Their 



country trade will be cut off entirely by the evacuation of small 
towns of the interior, where trade is mainly supported by a min- 
ing population. An effective organization should be formed im- 
mediately, backed by a plentiful supply of capital to fight the 
black mailing schemes, both in the courts and out of them. If 
the owners of mining property have no rights which can be pro- 
tected by law. they should be justified in adopting other means 
which will secure them against outrage. We hope to hear of 
some steps being taken before long to gain an expression of pub- 
lic opinion on this important matter. As it stands to-day there 
is not a quartz mine located on odd sections along the line of 
railroad which is safe from confiscation. Years of possession, 
even when backed by United States Patent, count for little 
against the flimsy plea now raised that the land is agricultural. 
SSS 

THE local mining market is dull, with the exception of Tusca- 
rora stocks, which have advanced during the week. The 
most active is Commonwealth, which is in good demand since the 
mill started up. The ores run high, the average assay being over 
$280 per ton. A heavy shipment of bullion is expected during 
the month, and if no accident happens, the shareholders should 
soon have a regular run of dividends. Con. Cal. and Virginia has 
just paid a dividend of twenty-five cents per share. The reduc- 
tion meets with the favor of all sensible holders of the stock, who 
believe that it would have been belter to have cut the rate down 
long ago. Elsewhere there is nothing new in the market. The 
Silver King election will take place next week. There will be no 
change in the management, although a light running has been 
made by a member of the old management to retain his position 
in the company. 

JH 

THE Ruby and Dunderberg Consolidated Mining Company is 
about to be reconstructed, the usual course adopted by Eng- 
lish manipulators when a mine gives out. The property has been 
a valuable one in its day, but it is doubtful when the ground was 
virgin from the surface down to the lowest working at present, if it 
was valued more highly than it is to-day, with its stopes stripped 
of every pound of available ore. Mining capitalists in San Fran- 
cisco, or elsewhere in the United States, would feel highly insulted 
if a property in a similar condition were offered to them at such 
an outrageous price as $500,000. Money must be plentiful in 
England when such schemes meet with favor among investors. 
The Garfield recently underwent a similar reconstruction, and the 
capital obtained after the property was gophered, fully equaled 
the amount paid out in the first instance, before the mine had 
been opened up. 

HI 

GEORGE M. PINNEV has scored another success as a mining 
promoter. He has just succeeded in disposing of the Moun- 
tain Ledge mines of Sierra County for a good round sum. The 
capital of the new company is $500,000, of which $350,000 has 
already been subscribed. The construction of a mill will begin 
immediately, but active work on the property will not commence 
until the spring, owing to the heavy snowfall. The mines are 
located about three miles northwest of Sierra City, in a direct line 
between the Sierra Buttes and Young America mines, both of 
which have a good record as bullion-producers. The title to the 
property is United States patent. 

THE semi-annual statement of The Nevada Bank of San Fran- 
cisco, which has just been published, shows, as usual, a very 
prosperous condition of affairs. The assets of the Bank aggre- 
gate $5,572,701.34, of which $G92,818.17 in cash on hand, the bal- 
ance being represented by real estate, stocks and bonds. The de- 
posit account shows a heavy increase over the previous statement, 
amounting to over $2,000,000. The stock of the Bank is now 
held in the following proportions: W. Mackay, 15,000 shares; J. 
L. Flood, 14,250 shares; J. F. Bigelow, 250 shares; A. E. Davis, 
250 shares, and R. H. Follis, 250 shares. 
¥ * I 

WE learn that Mr. M. F. Campbell, the mining man, is at 
Durango, Mexico, awaiting the consummation of sales of 
some very valuable mining properties there to an English syndi- 
cate. As Campbell is a practical miner, and carries a long head 
to boot, the chances are in favor of the purchasers getting a 
squarer deal than they could expect at the hands of the sharpers 
who for some time have been playing for control of the Mexican 
business in the assumed nile of mining experts. It is a healthy 
sign when these irresponsible vagrants are driven over the border, 
leaving the field clear to honest and responsible men. 
SSS 

JAMES R. KELLY, the well-known merchant, has been ap- 
pointed President of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Associa- 
tion, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Joseph 
Donohoe. Mr. Kelly, who has for years past filled the position 
of Vice-President of the bank, received the unanimous votes of 
the Directors, and was highly complimented for his able and pru- 
dent management of their affairs in the past. 
SSS 

JOHN W. MACKAY will sail from Liverpool for America on 
the 12tb inst. 



Jan. 11. : 



SAN Ki; \Wis< o NEWS LETTER. 



L5 




•Hear the Trior: " "Whm the devil art thou." 
* Odc that will pUy tho 'levil. Mr, with vou." 



WHILE it cannot be denied that our young officers are doing 
theniselTM, toe War Department and the country generally 
much credit by their talent in leading the gcrman in society, as 
well a- the first attack upon the supper table, it must he acknowl- 
Ihat the rank and tile are going to the deuce. At the Pre- 
.t Black Point, al Angel [eland, at every post in this harbor, 
pay-day is the signal for the opening of chuck-a-luck, faro and 
Dthet game in the catalogue. The result is that a few days 
afterward there is not a cent in the post, except among the saving 
ones, and they are largely in the minority. Why not follow the 
English custom i and pay them once a week, or, still better, once 
a day. This at least would stop the gambling, because none 
would be so rash as to endeavor to brace the game on a fifty-cent 
capital. Then, while the food is good, the cooking is abominable. 
Company cooks are sent to this occupation in the line of punish- 
ment, and naturally they revenge themselves on their comrades 
by spoiling as much as lies in their power of the rations furnished 
by the government. Men want to desert after pay-day, and do 
not even wait for dinner, and small blame to them. Congress 
makes ample appropriation for all these things, but the adminis- 
tration of the money is simply damnable. 

THE story is growing. The Eastern sporting papers now have 
it that there are two California widows of wealth striving for 
the hand of Peter Jackson, the pugilist. 

Can this be true I hear of you 

(The reporters tell the facts on,) 
Two "widows" bold, with lots of gold, 

Are mashed on Peter Jackson. 
I understand that for your hand 

One has proposed, dear Peter, 
The other waits, from foreign land, 
Your glad return, to greet her. 
I know them both, tho' rather loth, 

To help their suit, my hearty; 
You understand; one wants your head, 

So does the other party. 
For one has long, (to end my song,) 

Loved men like Peter Jackson; 
The other jay runs night and day, 
A business there's no tax on. 

THE story of "the office seeking the man " is generally re- 
garded as a fable of the deepest dye, but I know of a case 
where an official salary has to hunt the man every month, and it 
finds him, too. The lucky official is a man named Asa Ellis. 
About four and a half years ago he received the appointment of 
Internal Revenue Collector for this district, and promptly filing 
his bond, he tried to master the duties of the position. He found 
it more difficult to fill than to obtain the office, however, and after 
posing for a time as " an awful example " for ambitious incom- 
petents, be became tired of running a " holy show " on his own 
account, and, a year or two ago, he fled to the fastnesses of 
Fresno county. Though he has since successfully dodged the 
labor of holding down his office chair, he cannot, however, dodge 
his salary, and regularly every month a faithful deputy in the 
revenue office forwards him his little wad, $333.33. 

THE common belief that our principal dailies are news-gatherers 
is evidently a common error. For instance, a poor wretch was 
rescued from a stormbound rock last Friday night, and up to 
the present date the Call, Chronicle and Bulletin are unable to agree 
upon the identity of the noble rescuer. The Call asserts that a 
city-front boatman did the deed; the Chronicle gives the credit to 
the crew of a tugboat, and the Bulletin awards the palm to a cou- 
ple of men (occupation not given), named Kelly and Haxton. 
The outlook is not altogether discouraging, however. If any of 
the papers named is ever guilty of a praiseworthy deed, the 
Examiner may be regretfully compelled to stick its head in the 
dirt to avoid being galled by a sight that is pleasing to every other 
eye. 

A POOR unfortunate, blessed with greater credulity than intelli- 
gence, writes to the Examiner to ask whether the phrase, 
"To-morrow is Sunday," or "To-morrow will be Sunday," is the 
proper form; and, without turning a hair, the great source of 
public information easily replies, "To-morrow is Sunday." I am 
satisfied that if the oracle could have been sounded to the depth 
of his intelligence, he would have added, "and yesterday is Fri- 
day." 

MR. BEHRENS, a young architect of this city, was cut on the 
cheek last week with a sharp instrument in the hands of a 
resident of the Barbary Coast. Those who are acquainted with 
Mr. Behrens are anxious to know from whose factory the sharp 
instrument that was keen enough to make an impression on that 
gentleman's cheek, came. 



THE g«>od ship drifted on the rocks, 
The fat seals yawped and roared, 
And calmly by his biasing fire 

The brave life-saver snored. 
Where were his dreams in that soft hour 

Of gales and icebergs grim '.' 
Did memories of the frozen North 

Throng thick and fast on him? 
Ah, no! fur one short hour before 

He'd sat him snugly down 
To Limburger and lager beer, 

And pretzels crisp and brown. 
He dreamed he called for Hamburg eels, 

And Frankfurter and kraut — 
Hark! through the tempest now is heard 

The drifting seaman's shout. 
The brave Life-saver turned his head, 

Half conscious of the cry, 
His soul still wrestling with his dream, 

And softly murmured " Zwei." 
" Widout de foam " — Ah, heaven be praised, 

The jibs have caught the breeze, 
The good ship swings, once more her head 

Points to the open seas. 
The Captain swears, the mate is wroth, 

They shake an angry fist, 
Toward where the brave life-saver's hut 

Shows dimly through the mist. 
He slumbers on, a calm, sweet smile, 

O'er his bronzed forehead steals, 
He whispers with a happy sigh, 
" Dere goot, dose Hamburg eels." 

BEWARE of the Spanish beauty, Te.lemachus, for their dark 
eyes make sad work with the susceptible heart. Nay, it is 
but a few days ago since a gay lover of this city, " who loves all 
that's lovely, and loves all he can, met a sweet Castilian, affected 
her, and she smiled on him. He raved about her so much, about 
his Juanita, his dark-eyed darling, his lump of chewing candy, 
etc., that a relief party was organized among his friends to cure 
him, and this is the way they went about it: The lovelorn one 
got a letter from Juanita, from San Jose, begging him to visit her 
that evening. He flew to the office to be excused, snatched his 
grip and rushed to the train. It was a long and dreary ride, but 
his ardor was kept alive by visions of his meeting with Juanita. 
At San Jose he barely paused to gobble a mutton chop, ere he 
sped to the tryst. Wearily he paced the ground, but no Juanita 
appeared, and after a miserable night the disgusted lover returned 
to town. Next day brought a letter from Juanita. So sorry, but 
her big brother blocked the game; but would he meet her next 
evening at San Rafael. Again he primped up, and voyaged to 
the village of dudes and tennis. Seated in the parlor of the 
Tamalpais, he awaited the Spanish fair. Suddenly the door flew 
open and in marched the committee, singing with infinite pathos, 
" Juanita, Juanita, let me linger by thy side." Then he knew 
the letters were forgeries, and, weeping bitterly, he was led to 
the bar. 

MISS KEENER, of Jacksonville, did not share Big John's 
prejudice against the colored race, unfortunately for that 
young woman's general health. A girl who rides on the box with 
her coachman's arm around her waist, shows a disregard for the 
conventionalities more daring than admirable. Her attentions to 
a pretty school girl, and the girl's succeding illness, points to the 
fact that the world is much better without women of the Keener 
stripe. 

THIS weather is making divorce matters lively. Cold feet do it. 
If young married ladies could but understand the dangers 
that attend this practice of planting their icy soles upon any por- 
tion of their husband's anatomy, even when accompanied by the 
apology, " So cold, George," they would rather dance a breakdown 
before going to bed than do it. Cold feet knock sentiment galley- 
west. They fill the recipient's mind with bitter thoughts, and 
send Cupid flying through the transom with the snufiies. 

PRINCE MURAT professes himself quite satisfied with the 
allowance Miss Caldwell is to give him. Now the Prince is 
an oldish man, a very battered sort of man, and it is a question, 
therefore, if Miss Caldwell will be satisfied after marriage, with 
the allowance of marital affection His Highness will bestow upon 
her. 

CORONER TAYLOR'S resignation is to be regretted all the 
more because of the appointment of Dr. Eaton, Christopher 
Buckley's private secretary, to the place. The corpse who goes 
to the Styx now, with even an obolus for his ferriage, when Cor- 
oner Eaton is about, will have to be a pretty shrewd remains. 
AN up-country paper, speaking of the Pan-American Congress, 
refers to the Hon. M. M. Estee as " the ass-at-large from Cali- 
fornia." Great Scott! Have our country editors an unslaked 
thirst for slander! Have they no State pride! Are they thus de- 
termined to damn the reputation of California's stock-breeding in- 
terests ! 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 1? 





5UNLCAMS 



£( /GENTLEMEN," said a temperance spouter at a meeting down 
\J at Drinkwater, screwing himself into a paroxyism of earnest- 
ness, " Drink! Drink. I say, is the curse of this country. It saps 
the nerve and intelligence of the land. I knew a young man who 
might have wjrked his way to tame. But he became a slave to the 
demon of drink, and ended" his career in a felon's cell. I tell you 
again, you cannot drink and get a-head." " You are mistaken, sir," 
politely interrupted a pale-faced young man among the audience." 
" How so? " inquired the lecturer nupatieutly. " Why. you said we 
cannot drink and get a head. It always struck me as being the sur- 
est way of getting one." And the buzz of approval that slid through 
the hall of the emaciated one's opposite retort, fairly completed the 
orator's confusion. 

Tell us not in spoony verses 

Married life is all a dream ; 
Jle who oft his joy rehearses 

la not glad as he may seem. 
Heads of all bald men remind us 

We should choose our wives with care; 
Or departing leave behind us 

Half our natural crop of hair. — Town Topics. 

One of the board of education, going his rounds as an amateur, 

put the following question to a scholar in a country school: '* How 
do you parse 'Mary milked the cow?'" Pupil — "Cow is a noun, 
feminine gender, singular number, third person, and stands for Mary." 
" Stands for Mary ! " ezc^aime 1 he of the board, " how do you make 
that out?" " Because," added the intelligent pupil, "if the cow 
didn't stand for Mary, how could Mary milk her? " 

— Texas Sif tings. 

Sweet lady with the gentle eyes 

And lips of cherry red- 
Nay start not in annoyed surprise 
Nor toss thy haughty head — 
Go chatter through the opera, 
And giggle, flirt, all that; 
But pity those who sit behind, 

And doff thy giant hat. — Chicago Journal. 

American Heiress — How am I to tell that your claims to nobility 

are not fictitious? Pseudo Count — Ah. my dear madame, I am ze 
true, ze real Count de Lurembug. Heiress — But you are deeply in 
debt? Count— No. no, my dear, I do not owe $1. 'Heiress— Have you 
the pawn tickets of our golden decorations about you? Count—No 

?>awn tickets have I, fair charmer, and no debts. Heiress (indignant- 
y) — A vaunt, deceiver! Now I know you are an impostor. 

— Exchange. 
Mendicant—Is that you, Tilly? Tilly— Yes, Father. Mendi- 
cant — Well, run home and tell mother not to forget to deposit the 
money I left with her this morning, and to have duck and green peas 
for dinner to-night. (Heariny a strange footstep.) Pity the poor blind ! 

Life. 
— Tramp — Kind lady, will you give me something to eat? Lady — 
We have some chops left over from breakfast. You can have those. 
Tramp (with a scornful look) — Excuse me: they are a little too suggest- 
ive of the wood pile. I couldn't take any comfort eating 'em. 

— Pittsburg Press. 

"Adolphus," murmured Anastasia, calmly ensconsing her 

head on his shirt front, " do you never yearn after the unattainable? " 
" Verily, he replied, " I doth." '• And for what do you yearn, love? " 
" For a raise in my salary." — Lawrence American. 

Tripper— What sort of a band do you prefer? a brass or a string? 

Miss Gayhird— 0. dear, neither. The one is too hard and the other 
cuts. Give me blue silk elastic with gold and jeweled buckles. 

— Town Topics. 
Nahum Spawlding — Yo' won't tight, heh ! Den youse a mis'rble 
sneakin' coward, yo' is. Hezektah Thomas— Dat's all rite; ef yo' had- 
n't knowed dat, yo'd bin askeered ter otfah to tight me. 

First Robber — Going to rob Bronson's house to-night? Seco7id 

Robber— Naw. First Robber— Why not? Secdnd Robber— Ain't nothin' 
there. Bronson paid his gas bill yesterday. 

Mormon Shade — How many of my wives are inside? St. Peter — 

Five. Mormon Shade— So the rest are in hell? Let me go there. 

"NEWS LETTER" POSTSCRIPTS. 



Maid of Berkeley, answer me 
What I have to ask of thee! 
Dost thou love me with a heart 
Full of passion, not of art? 
Then be artless while I stay. 
And no more beseech me *' nay!" 
By those tresses I behold. 
Bright as Sacramento gold ! 
By those cheeks of white and pink, 
Bought with San Francisco wink! 
By the thrills thou giv'st my heart, 
I will know thee as thou art! 
Maid of Berkeley, I'll away, 
Far to 'Frisco, o'er the bay, 
Where I'll spend the coming week, 
Shekels many there to seek, 
So that I may match thy hair 
With a golden garland rare. 



iir^s-cne^-iiTc:^ 




IN8URANCE COMPANY. 

CAPITAL.. $1,000,000, | ASSETS 

D. J. STAPLES, Presideat. 
ALJPHEUS JtsULL, Vice President. 



$2,360,000. 



| WILLIAM J. DUTTON, Secretary. 
| B. FAYMONVILLE, Ass't Secretary. 



Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United States. 

fire. ^yr:-A_iai3srE- 

The Largest Assets of any Company West of New York State. 

Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation 

OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
Office, 315 Montgomery Street aud 410 Pine Street. 

CAPITAL (Fully Paid) : ?2,000,000 

ASSETS 2,672,849 



LOUIS SLOSS. .. . 
WM. MACDONALD 



President I Z. P. CLARK. 
Vice President J. B. LEVHON. 



Secretary 

Marine Secretary 



THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 

fieb -a-jstjd ZMZ-AiairrsnE:. 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up J400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 278 AMD 220 SANS0ME STREET, 

San Francisco, California. 
GEOKGE L. BRANDEK, CHAS. H. CUSHING, P. J. WHITE, 

President. Secretary. Vice-President. 

Boakd OF Directobs— D. Callaghan, P. J. White, J. M. Donanue, GEO. 

L. Brauder, E. L. Goldstein, L. Cunningham, M. Kane, Fisher Ames, Dr. 

C. F. Buckley, Dr. Wm. Jones, G. H. Wheaton, T. McMulliu, H. H. Watson, 

H. Dimoud, P. Bo la 

THE SOUTH BRITISH 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. 

capital $i0.000.u00. 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

Office— 412 California Street, San Francisco. 

A. S. HURRAY, Manager. 
SAN FRANCISCO CITY DEPARTMENT: 
CONRAD & MAX.WEL.L, Agent 

421 California Street. 

CALIFORNIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Organized February, 1861. 

CashCapital I 600,000 OU 

Assets 1,300,000 00 

Net Surplus as regards Policyholders 820,000 00 

Losses Paid 3,500,000 00 

CITY DEPARTMENT: 

A. C. DONNELL, Manager, 

318 California Street. S. F. 

Department of the Pacific States and Territories. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL $10,000,000. | CASH ASSETS IN U. S . . »746,186.00 

SCOTTISH UNION AND NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

CAPITAL *S0,000,000 | CASH ASSETS $16,407,072.46 

420 California Street, San Francisco, Cat. 
W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent 

BRITISH AND F0REI6N MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL J5.000.000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 
No. 316 California Street. San Francisco. 

ABBREGATE ASSETS, $46,000,000- 

London Assurance Corporation of London [Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Company of London [Established 1836. ■ 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1857.] 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 
S. E. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets^Safe Deposit Bu ilding. 



HENRY C. HYDE, 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 

MICROSCOPICAL. EXAMINER 

Of Handwriting, Inks, Papers, etc., in the Detection of ForgerieB, 

Counterfeits and Imitations. 

41 IS CALIFORNIA STREET. San Francisco. 



Jan. 11. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



./-> 






TIIK high! <>f ?ea waves ha? long been the subject of contro- 
versy. Kminent hyilrographers have insisted that storm 
waves were usually not more than ten feet high, ami rarely over 
twenty when the conditions of the sea were most favorable for 
wave development Many a traveler, reclining on a cabin tran- 
som, hu looked up through the skylight to see the waves rearing 
their frothy crests, and wondered howeven a 20 footer could show 
so high ahuve a great ship's deck. Many a sailor dowsed by an 
up-driving wave while lying out on a topgallant yard has, doubt- 
less, shaken his head incredulously when told that the highest 
waves were not above 20 feet, the rest being » heel " of ship and 
dip of yard. Now, however, conies expert testimony to prove 
that storm waves are often -10 feet, and sometimes from GO to 70 
feet in hight. In the recent British scientific expedition some in- 
structive data were gathered by a sensitive aneroid barometer capa- 
ble of recording its extreme rise and fall by an automatic regis- 
ter. ■' With a sea not subjected to an atmosphere of unusual vio- 
lence, it indicated an elevation of 40 feet from the wave's base to 
crest." Admiral Fitzroy, after a long series of careful measure- 
ments from the main top of his ship, came to a similar conclusion. 

— Scientific American. 

In the erection of the upper portion of the Eiffel Tower, it 

was found that plumb-lines could not be trusted, owing to the vi- 
bration caused by air-currents. It was, therefore, decided to have 
recourse to the theodolite, and to determine by its aid whether 
the central lines of the four faces were at all points in the princi- 
pal planes of the tower. By principal planes is meant the verti- 
cal projections along two lines at right angles intersecting in the 
center of the plan of the tower. On account of the difficulty of 
marking the central points on the tower, this method of testing 
its verticality was not found applicable. The difficulty was, how- 
ever, obviated by sighting to the centers of the faces, points which , 
as a rule, have a distinctive character, instead of to marked cen- 
tral points. If the theodolite is so placed that, when its telescope 
is rotated, the center of the crosswires coincides with two points 
in the horizontal plane of the line of section, the vertical wire will 
cut the tower in a line following the direction of the principal 
plane. The testing of the verticality of the tower then consists 
merely in ascertaining whether the central line of the face actually 
coincides with the determination of the vertical plain. This is a 
very simple operation : but one susceptible of very great precision. 
If the observation is made on the four faces of the tower, and the 
coincidences of the two lines are found to be exact, it necessarily 
follows that the axis of the tower is absolutely verticle. For the 
test to be conclusive, the theodolite must, at each observation, be 
set up with great accuracy in each one of the principal planes. In 
this manner the verification of the verticality of the tower was 
actually effected, the results obtained being perfectly satisfactory. 
— M. E. Thuasne, in Nouvelles Annates de la Construction. 

Dr. Magnan has read a paper before the Biological Society 

of Paris, on insanity among anti-vivisectionists, a complaint he 
avers to be very common. One anti-vivisectionist dame he knew 
directed her energies towards cats, and had a veritable " hospital," 
with beds, blankets, and savory food, for sick << Tabbies." Among 
the anti-vivisectionists, too, was a lady who became a vegetarian, 
in order not to eat the flesh of animals. Her hobby was to go 
every morning to the slaughter-yard at Villettee in order to abuse 
roundly the slayers of oxen. — Hospital. 

— The Engineering and Mining Journal has seen the drawings 
for a new steamer intended to make the Atlantic voyage in 4i 
days. She is to be 434 ft. long, 2,880 tons displacement, patterned 
after the French torpedo boats. The new ship is to be capable of 
making 35 knots an hour for 24 hours, and an average for the 
above voyage of 28 knots an hour. 

Sir Edward Watkin has been promptly supplied with de- 
signs for his colossal tower of'steel in London, purposely intended 
to dwarf the Tour d'Eiffel. He has had 400 plans submitted, and 
with this plethora of engineering talent hard at work it will be 
Sir Edward's own fault if he fails to select something original, if 
not graceful. 

- - There is good news for our soprano primi donni, as a Ger- 
man scientific press has proved that it is preferable to use female 
voice for the telephone, as its tones are much more distinctly 
heard than, those of the male voice; in fact, soprano ought to be 
selected. 

A novel feature of the forthcoming exhibition in Edinburgh 

will be a working ship railway, on theplan of Mr. William Smith, 
of Aberdeen. This consists in keeping the ship immersed in water 
while upon the car, so that it may be said to continue in its nat- 
ural element. 

The most recent researches of Professor S. P. Langley indi- 
cate that the mean temperature of the sunlit lunar soil is probably 
not greater than zero Centigrade, or 32° Fan. 



lasrsxj^^isrcE. 



Exhibit October 1st, 18S9. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

216 Sanso.ve Street 

Losses p'd since orgaul'n. $3,011, r 25.77 I Reinsurance Reserve ...$ 255,052.20 
Assets October 1, 1<KW . 816,748.87 Capital paid up, Gold . . 300,000 00 
Surplus for policy holders 801,a54.ft3 | 
Net Surplus, over capital aud all liabilities, October 1, 1883. .. 240,902.62 

fire Losses paid la 1*8D ?169,08R.70 

Fire Losses unpaid October 1, 1889 11,794 04 

President J. F. HOUGHTON I Secretary CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-Pres ident... J. L. N. SHEPARD I Geueral Agent R. H. MAGILL 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIAT" 

JIBE AU D ZMZ-A-BJlSriEI. 

CAPITAL, Paid in Full $ 200,000.00 

ASSETS, December 31. 1888 460,086.70 

LOSSES Paid Since Organization 2,101,032.71 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 
Chas. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(Safe Deposit Building). San Francisco, Cal. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF HAMBURG. 

Capital $1,600,000.00 

Net surplus 408,400.27 

Assets January I, 1889 1,311,809.84 

Invested in U. S 618,362.96 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 
232 California Street, - - San Francisco, Cal. 

E&~ General Agents for the United States and Territories west of the 
Rocky Mountains. 

THAMESlND MERSEY MARINE INSUR"aNCTcTmPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Reserve fund (in addition to Capital) 2,126,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 6.124,057.60 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

306 California Street. San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. BALOISE of Basle— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under au English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street, San F rancisco. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $9,260,000 

Cash Assets 2,764,876 

Cash Assets In United States 1.398,646 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS, 
316 California Street, San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782.] 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & BALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for 8an Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class Companies, or Grain sold, if 
desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company. 202 Sansome St.. over the Anglo-California Bank. 

100 Per Cent. Dividend Guaranteed 

■ BY THE 

MANHATTAN LIFE INSURANCEJOMPANY OF NEW YORK. 

If you will send your age aud address, we will cheerfully return you our 
Rates, and Results of our NEW PLAN. It will impose No Obligation. 

Manhattan Life Insurance Company of New York. 

Cash Assets, January 1, 1889. $11,543,048.80 

JOHN LANDERS, General Agent, 

240 Montgomery St., S. E. comer Pine St., Rooms 1 and 2, Sau Francisco. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 1890. 



4E&S2PC2* 




THE San Bruno Improvement Club was organized the other 
night, and one of the objects of the organization was stated 
to be the election of praper persons to fill the public offices. There 
are a number of these improvement clubs, and in different parts 
of the city, among others the Church Street Improvement Club, 
the Castro Street, the North Beach, the Point Lobos Avenue and 
several others. None of these organizations were formed with a 
view of having them take any part in politics, but all with an 
eye single to the improvement of their respective neighborhoods. 
Consequently they are composed of progressive and representa- 
tive citizens, all of whom have an active interest at stake, and 
they are wholly free from political hacks and tax-eaters. This 
being the undoubted fact, why should not these improvement 
clubs make the selection of proper city and county officers their 
particular business? Why should not they, through a general 
organization, containing none but bona fide members, each of 
them a property owner, put a ticket in the field, as against that 
prepared by the political bosses and their connubiators. It is not 
necessary that these clubs, which have been of great use, and 
have done much to further the interests of the various localities 
in which they labor, should go into politics, but it would cer- 
tainly further the object for which they were established if they 
were to undertake the task of securing for the city a clean and 
honest set of o.ticials. No better opportunity nor a better instru- 
ment to make use of that opportunity has ever presented itself. 
It would simply be necessary for the several clubs to elect or ap- 
point representatives to take part in a general convocation, which 
could then proceed as a nominating convention. There remains 
just time enough between now and the November election to 
carry the plan out circumspectly and carefully. It is only neces- 
sary that care be taken to exclude the politicians from all partici- 
pation. If that be done, success is certain, and the material in- 
terests of San Francisco will receive the biggest •' boost " which 
they have experienced for a long time. 

The holidays are at last over, and the brokers and agents are 
once more bending down to the task in hand, the sale of real es- 
tate at the highest obtainable price and for the highest possible 
commission. And it is to be confessed that they are doing quite 
well, considering the surrounding circumstances, which in many 
respects are not as favorable as they might be. But it is easily to 
be seen that a very healthy and confident tone prevails in the 
market, so that the increasing stringency of money has practi- 
cally no effect whatever upon the course of trade. If owners 
were just a shade more liberal in their demands, the volume of 
business would be materially larger, but the fear of not getting all 
that may possibly be had seems to be constantly before their eyes, 
and accordingly, many an intending buyer retires in disgust. 
Things have not yet gone far enough in the new year to result in 
many transactions, and so almost all the sales now reported are 
the results of trades practically concluded already in the old year. 

The list of property purchased north of Market street has been 
added to by the transfer of the Zeile property on the south side of 
Pacific street, 137:6 feet west of Montgomery, thence south 275x 
west 69:llx north-west 106 :llx north 192:10 and east 137:6, hav- 
ing a southerly frontage on Montgomery Avenue. The purchaser 
of all these parcels north of Market street now turns out to be 
Ex-Senator Fair, and simultaneously comes the announcement 
that he will purchase no more, his absorptions to date having 
raised prices to higher figures than he is willing to pay. It re- 
mains now to be seen whether or not these prices will be able to 
maintain themselves at present asking rates. Fair's purchases at 
a rough guess involve perhaps a three-quarters of a million dol- 
lars, and their immediate effect has been to raise the valuation of 
the entire property by a great many millions, and furnishes a 
striking illustration of the ease with which the market could be 
manipulated, and ho.v readily owners will coincide with the opin- 
ion of a man who has the courage to back them with coin. 

Some other sales in various parts of the town may profitably 
be mentioned. Among these we have the sale of outside land, 
block 1,213. at the corner of Twenty-sixth street and Fortieth 
avenue, for $3,000; the southwest corner of Page and Baker 
streets, 127:3x137:6; 31:4x127:8 on the north side of Washington 
street, 103 feet east of Broderick, $8,000; 137:6x137:6 on the 
southeast corner of Broderick and Green streets, $0,500; 46:2x 
1)4:6 on the northwest corner of O'Farrell and Laguna streets, 
$7,000; 50:6x127:6 on the north side of Washington street, 130 
feet east of Webster, and 55x127 :8 on the south side of Jackson 
street, 165 feet west of Laguna street. 

South of Market street there were sales as follows; 45:10x137:6 
on the south side of Mission street, 45:10 feet east of First, $41,000; 
89:7x144:9 on the northeast corner of Bond and Mission streets, 
$30,000; 25x90 on the south side of Folsom street, 225 feet east of 
Ninth, $7,000; 22:11x137:6 on the west side of Spear street, 229 
feet north of Folsom; 50x100 on the north side of Howard, 200 
feet east of Second street. West of Kearny street the sales in- 
cluded 52:3x137:6 on the west side of Jones street, 137:6 feet 



south of Geary; 47:6x77:6 on the southeast corner of O'Farrell 
and Hyde streets; 21:5x70 on the north side of Post street, 80 feet 
east of Stockton street; 25x62:6 on the north side of Pine street, 
87:6 feet west of Mason; and 40x80 on the south side of Jackson 
street, 30 feet east of Dupont. 

The Sixteenth street cut controversy is in a fair way of being 
settled by the adoption of the deflected or Sutro route. To do so 
would be but common sense, for a cut some hundred and fifty 
feet in depth would prove the ruination of the entire neighbor- 
hood. 

The Mission street widening enterprise has received a serious 
set-back in the discovery that there has never been made a proper 
survey of the land to be taken, and now that the assessments 
have been collected, there seems to be no way of paying for the 
expense of a survey at the present time. There is already much 
dissatisfaction at the manner in which the commissioners have 
performed their duty, and should they essay to levy a further 
assessment, it is more than probable that a test case regarding the 
constitutionality of the law will result. And what with the sal- 
aries of three commissioners, a secretary, attorney, clerk, surveyor 
and several others, the judicial interment of the act, which 
squarely and fairly offends the provision of the Constitution which 
says that no municipal improvement or function shall at any time 
be committed to or exercised by any commission, will cause no 
regret. It would be well for the Board of Supervisors to remem- 
ber that all these various widening schemes proceed largely upon 
the sufferance of the interested property-owners, and that any 
one of them, if so inclined, could block the way most effectively 
by a comparatively inexpensive legal proceeding. 

SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT 

OF 

The Nevada Bank of San Francisco, 

JANUARY I, 1890. 

ASSETS. 

Real Estate $ 6^5,158 43 

Miscellaneous Bonds and Stocks. 591,191 18 

Loans on Keal Estate 67,629 70 

Loans on Stocks, Bonds aud Warrants. (328,252 46 

Loans on other Securities, Grain, etc 954,125 33 

Loaus on Personal Security 1,063,527 52 

Due from Banks and Bankers t>0 ,998 26 

Money on hand 692,818 51 

Total Assets 



LIABILITIES. 

Capital - $3,000,000 00 

Due Depositors 2,007,08113 

Due Bauks and Bankers 406,517 52 

Profit aud Loss Account 149,621 00 

Other Liabilities 9,48174 



Total Liabilities 



$5,572,701 39 



$5,572,701 39 



State of California, / 

City and County of San Francisco, ( 

We do solemnly swear that we have (and each of us has) a personal 
knowledge of the matters contained in the foregoing report, and that 
every allegation, statement, matter aud thing therein contained is true, to 
the best of our knowledge and belief. 

J. P. BIGELOW, Vice-President. 
D. B. DAVIDSON, Cashier. 
Subscribed aud sworn to before me, this 4th day of January, 1890. 
[Seal. J J. II. BLOOD, Notary Public. 



STOCKHOLDERS. 

,vi»if. Shares. 

J. W. Mackay 15,000 

J L. Flood 14,250 

J. F BigelOW 250 

A.E.Davis 250 

R. H. Follis 250 

IB IE IR, T O IT SIEC. 




A NATURAL AND FRUITY WINE 

EM. MEYER & CO., 



Sole Agents Pacific Coast, 



413 and 415 Pine Street. 



Jan. 11. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



li) 



*5£ € 00 




MR. IIKNKV PROWDE, ol the Oxford University Press, Amen 
pner, B. C, baa |ns1 published the ■• Finger" Prayer-book 
[or the chatelaine, the waistcoat pocket] »>r the purse. 
This tiny volume, which weighs in limp binding about three- 
quarters of an ounce, is only 1 inch in breadth, 3| inches in 
length, a inch in thickness; yet it contains B70 pages. 

the whole «>f the English Prayer-book, unabridged, 
in a type which, though necessarily minute, is yet clear, distinct, 
and perfectly legible. It is pre-eminently the Prayer-book for the 
chatelaine; it will go with ease into a purse or a waistcoat pocket. 
It may be said to make a further advance in the production of 
miniature books, and it is an achievement in delicate workman- 
ship even greater than the production of the " smallest Bible in 
the world " ( from the same press, which was first issued in 1875, 
and excited considerable interest, which has continued to the 
present time. 



Practicality and variety are the prominent characteristics of the 
number of Good Housekeeping for January. The paper entitled 
- rew Loose in the Household Machinery" is very stimu- 
lating to the processes of thought, but with the wide differences 
of judgment as to what are the best ways of "managing" the 
home expenses, the problem suggested by the paper is not likely 
to prove easy of solution. "Practical Window Gardening," by 
Mrs. M. J. riumstead; "Mending Day," by Sarah A. Peple; 
"Schoolday Dresses for Little Misses," by a school-teacher; » Our 
Children and Their Treatment," the first of a series, and others 
are especially practical and useful papers. The other contents are 
up to the mark. 

The brave little Cosmopolitan, which sent Elizabeth Bisland 
round the world, is to hand, and the January number is far more 
interesting than some of its wealthier contemporaries. An article 
which cannot but fail to attract attention is from the young lady 
who is completing the circle of the world. It is on "Famous 
Beauties Well Illustrated." J, Macdonald Oxley commences an 
interesting history of the Hudson Bay Company, under the title 
of •* The Romantic Story of a Great Corporation." 



Mr. Whistler has just returned from Holland, where he has 
been engaged for nearly a month etching ten plates of views of 
interiors, canals, etc., at Amsterdam. These plates may be reck- 
oned as among that eminent etcher's best work in that manner. 
It is understood that Mr. Whistler, who is on the eve of starting 
for Spain, intends to bold an exhibition of his works in the next 
season. 



The Century, for January, is an admirable number. The arti- 
cles that are perhaps of greatest interest are those which deal of 
the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and the pursuit and death 
of John Wilkes Booth. These articles are from the pens of John 
G. Nicolay, John Hay, Prentiss Ingraham, M. B. Buggies, E. P. 
Doherty, C. G. D. Roberts, and John Heard, Jr. 

The report that Stanley has sold the copyright of his forthcom- 
ing book for £40,000 is, it is said, an exaggeration. Such profits 
are not made, even on the most successful books published at 
high prices, as to permit of such a sum being given to Stanley, or 
anything approximating it. 



Mr. Robert Louis Stevenson is, according to the London corre- 
spondent of the Glasgow Herald, engaged upon a series of descrip- 
tive papers, to be collectively entitled "South Sea Idylls," and 
they will appear first in a popular American monthly. When 
last heard from Mr. Stevenson thought of spending his Christmas 
in Sydney, New South Wales. 

Mr. Swinbourne contributed to the Magazine of Art for January 
a poem in various metres. The subject is " Loch Torridon," and 
the poem is illustrated by three original drawings by Mr. Mac- 
Whirter. 

" Borrowing" is the title of a neat little volume, compiled and 
edited by the ladies of the First Unitarian Church, Oakland, and 
published by C. A. Murdock & Co., of this city. It consists of 
selections, poetic and otherwise, from several authors. The book- 
work is excellent. 

The editors of Current Literature have to be congratulated upon 
their monthly. It is admirably edited, and the literary selections 
could not be better. 



The Marquis of Lome is at present engaged upon a life of Lord 
Palmerston. 

J. P. Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated Whisky is for sale by all 
druggists and first- class grocers. Trade mark— star within a shield. 



JUST PUBLISHED ! 



Tra 



SAN FRANCISCO BLUE B00K--1 889. 



We take pleasure in making the following extraordinary and 
most liberal proposition in connection with the publishing of the 
Second Edition of the SAN FRANCISCO BLUE BOOK— 1889: 

FIRST. — Parties having Copper Plates in our custody, by calling 
and ordering 100 Visiting Cards from their plate and paying $1.75 for 
the same, will be presented with a copy of our San Francisco Blue 
Book with our compliments. 

SECOND.— Par ties not having their Copper Plates in our custody, 
who will call and leave the same with us for their future use and 
benefit, and order 100 Visiting Cards printed from their plates and 
pay $175 for the same, will be presented with a copy of our San 
Francisco Blue Book with our compliments. 

THIRD.— Parties not owning a Copper Plate, by calling and 
ordering one and 100 Visiting Cards, and paying $3.50 for the same, 
and leaving the plate in our custody for their future use and benefit, 
will be presented with a copy of our San Francisco Blue Book with 
our compliments. 

FOURTH.— Parties living out of town, by sending their orders 
(instead of calling and leaving them), together with the amount 
sufficient to pay the bill, will be entitled to the same terms as residents 
of this city, and will have the package sent express charges paid. 

FIFTH. — All parties ordering Wedding invitations of us printed 
from Copper Plate, will be presented with a copy of our San Fran- 
cisco Blue Book with our compliments. 

The above offers hold good until the edition becomes exhausted. 

The published price of the Second Edition of our San Francisco 
Blue Book, for 1889, bound in full cloth, will be $2.50; sent to any 
address, postpaid, on receipt of price. 

In connection with publishing the Blue Book we have established 
a private 

ADDRESS BUREAU 

in the front part of our store, in conjunction with our Fine Stationery 
Department, and will each day make corrections in the Blue Book as 
we derive the information. 

To enable us to do this as thoroughly as possible we invite our 
friends and patrons of the same to keep us constantly informed with 
regard to any change of residence or any contemplated lengthy ab- 
sence from home. Such information obtained we shall be pleased to 
furnish to inquiring friends and patrons upon application. 

721 MARKET STREET, S F. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 18 9. 



CURED BY "LA GRIPPE" 
[By D. W. C. N.] 

IT was about two o'clock one very wet morning, three weeks 
ago, when Mr. Sprudelschnapps came staggering home from 
the club, unstable as water but as cautious as a lynx. 

He would have reached the conjugal chamber in perfect safety 
and in his socks, had he not unfortunately given vent to a violent 
sneeze on the first landing. 

"Who's there?" cried the voice of the well-loved and badly- 
used Mrs. S. 

" It's moizelf (hie) dear (sneeze) got la grippe (hie) bad. 

"Two minutes afterwards Mrs. Sprudelschnapps had la grippe 
of another kind on his collar, that landed him in the royal bed- 
chamber with an energy which brought him upon all fours in the 
middle of the room. 

" Dot vos a zhameful vay as you treat me, ven you know I ave 
got la (hie) grippe," he said unsteadily. " You vait until you shall 
hear anoder sneeze. Perhaps it vas my last, but how much you 
care! Dot kooms of a good Zberman marrying himself mit an 
American frau." 

That same morning, before Mr. Sprudelschnapps had slept off 
the effects of the club champagne, Mrs. S. sent for the family doc- 
tor, and took him into her confidence. 

The result of her chat with their old friend Dr. Stubbings was 
that the medico went upstairs with Mrs. S., and the patient was 
duly awakened. 

After feeling his pulse and thumping his lungs, stethoscoping 
his back and making him take several inhalations and exhala- 
tions, Dr. Stubbings said, solemnly: 

" I am sorry to tell you both, as old friends, that the patient 
has the worst case of la grippe that I have seen so far. Without 
wishing to alarm you, I may state that the telegraph reports the 
death of the Emperor of Russia, Mr. Gladstone, King Humbert, 
Prince Bismarck and Queen Victoria this morning, all from la 
grippe, but none of them, as far as I can learn, with such serious 
symptoms as these." 

Mr. Sprudelschnapps groaned faintly, and put his head under 
the bed clothes. 

" But," continued the doctor, » I can save our friend here if he 
will be entirely guided by me. He must take the medicine I 
shall send four times a day regularly, and have plenty of nourish- 
ing food; on no account leave this room, but transact all his busi- 
ness down town by telephone, and that only when necessary. 
His partner can carry it on until he is convalescent. Have you 
made your will?" added the doctor. 

" Yes," from under the bed clothes. 

" He may have a little claret with his meals," he continued, 
"and a good warm whisky punch before going to sleep, but no 
other stimulants of any kind." 

" Danks be to Gott," in a smothered voice. 

" If his eyes do not water and blood run from his nose and 
ears, Mr. Sprudenschnapps may read light literature during the 
day, but on no account newspapers, through which the disease 
is often communicated by sick carriers during the present rainy 
weather. Keep him warm, not too warm, and don't let him get 
up under any condition. If he does not sleep at nights, give him 
the mixture I will send him." 

Here there came a terrific sneeze from under the bedclothes, 
for, be it confessed, Mr. Sprudelschnapps had contracted a good, 
square, ordinary, winter cold. 

The doctor bad been gone about five minutes when Mr. S's 
head popped up from under the bedclothes, and he muttered, 
faintly : 

" Don't you dink, Zallie, dot as Queen Victoria mid Prinz Biz- 
marck und dose oder fellers had lived, if dot dey had taken a good 
schtiff visky toddy on the gommenzement of dose sicknesses? 
Ven you vos make me zuch a ding, Zallie, dis morning, I buy you 
a zealskin yacket zo zoon I get veil mit myffelf." 

"No!" retorted Mrs. S., sharply, "your life is in my hands. 
You are to have onion soup and scrambled eggs for breakfast; 
that is what the doctor says." 

" You make me dot visky toddy, Zallie, and I write you an or- 
der for a zealskin yacket, a moof and a new dress." 

" But suppose it kills you ?" retorted Mrs. S. 

" I dake dose ghances." 

" Well, you keep warm and you shall have it, if it makes a 
murderess of me, Solomon," was the reply. 

In due time the Lagrippist was fitted out with a sockdolager 
cross between an " alamagoozler " and a " nipcatonherbriz," 
which he gulped down with great avidity, but not before he had 
given the promised order for the sealskins and the new dress. 

As he gave back the glass and lay back on the pillows, he 
moaned : 

" Vour undered dollars for a schtiff drink of visky. Herr Je! 
vot a price!" and the sick man returned to his slumbers. 

During the next four days, Mr. Sprudelschnapps was duly in- 
formed of the death of the Pope, the Emperor of Austria, Senator 
Stanford, President Cleveland, Boulanger, Dr. Stebbins, Mr. Blaine 
and Boss Buckley all from " la grippe," most of the alleged deaths 



haying been caused by " hippandropleuropneumonia " syncate- 
gorematically speaking, or as Dr. Stubbings said, " to be more 
medically correct, amorphous monocotyledonous meningitis of 
the pleura." 

It was only by importing such words at great expense that Mr. 
S. could be kept in the house, and when his cold had entirely dis- 
appeared, and he insisted upon being allowed to get up and go 
down town, the Doctor told him that the moment he left the room 
he would telephone for the dead wagon and the coroner. By the 
end of the second week the patient was pulling on two pounds 
of flesh a day, and the nightly punch had been entirely dispen- 
sed with, and he now confines himself entirely to light California 
wines at his meals, and to his home at night. 

He was a little disappointed at first to find out that all the 
crowned heads and politicians were alive up to date, but he con- 
soles himself by admiring his wife's sealskins as they drive out 
to the park, and he said to her in private recently: 

"Zallie, dot vos a most disrepewtable und zhamevul drick as 
yourzelf und Dr; Ztubbins play on me, but I give you gredit ven 
I gonzider dot zo far as I hear I vos der only man ever zaved by 
" La Grippe." 

Mrs. Julia Melville-Snyder is a woman who is an ornament to any 
city, and one who has been of incalculable advantage to the youth of 
this State. She has a faculty of teaching elocution, singing and voice 
culture, which is given to few, and that is why her parlors, at 138 Mc- 
Allister street are always crowded with pupils. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
Sole Agents Purimaohos Fire-proof Cement, "indestruct- 
ible and infallible." 
Sole Agents for " Bull Dog" brand of Bass' Ale and Guinness' 

STOUT-Bottled by Robert Porter & Co. 
Sole Agents Johnson's Elephant brand English Portland 

Cement. 
general agents— national assurance co. of ireland; 
atlas assurance co. of london ; 
boylston insurance co. of boston. 



H. B WILLIAMS. 



A. CHBSEBHOUOH. 



W. H. DlMOND 



WILLIAMS, DIMOND & GO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 



Agents for- 



Pacific Mail Steamship Company, 
Pacific Steam Navigation Company, 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship 

Company, 
"The California Line of Clippers," 

from New York, 



"The Hawaiian Line of Packets," 
The China Trade and Insurance Co. 

(L'd.), 
The Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

Steel Rails and Track Material. 



J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Ageuts for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, 8, S. Hepworth's Centri 
fugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 
327 Market Street, corner Fremont, 

BAN FRANCISCO. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street, : : San Francisco. 
Gold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 

g^" Manufacturers of Bluestone, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot and 
The "Standard " Machine-Loaded Shotgun Cartriog?s, under the 
Chamber/in Patents. 

ARIEL LATHEOP, WILLIAM HARNEY, TIMOTHY HOPKINS, 

President. Mgr. and Sec'y. Treasurer. 

GOLDEN 6ATE WOOLEN MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURE 

BLANKETS, CASSIMERES, TWEEDS AND FLANNELS. 
535 Market Street, San Francisco. 

CUNNINGHAM CURTISS, &. WELCH, 

WHOLESALE STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS, 

327, 329, 331 SANSOME STREET. 



8. L. JONES. 



E. L>. JONEB. 



S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 
207 and 209 California Street. 



Jan. 11. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



21 




Black mousseiine de soie, tulle, or Brussels net evening gowns 
have a full round skirt, bordered with silver or gold embroidery. 

Hats have a tendency to grow higher, and wings and birds flut- 
ter about the crown of a hat instead of the brim. 



VELVET train* f«»r women of average higbjl axe made of four 
breadths; their greatest length ts seventy-Jive inches, and 
the* are round «>r oval at the end, with very straight sides; at the 
top the mMdle breadths arc thickly pleated, and are usually set 
on the end ol the velvet bodice; the side breadths are then drawn 
back t«> the middle at the top and hooked there, to keep the train 
in alendeiTgraoef nl shape. Velvet is put quite plain down the 
back or the front of elbow sleeves, and the brocade or transparent 
Fabric is set on quite full. The Front of the gown shows most 
elaboration, the skirt consisting of a middle breadth of brocade 
in cross folds, placed to suit the wearer's hgure, and a fiat pleated 
breadth of ihe same each side, with a full-gathered panel of mous- 
seiine de chiffon or of spangled net or embroidered lisse between 
these breadths. Sometimes these brocade front breadths are set 
in plain, when it is well to slit them up from the foot, in open- 
ings eigiit or ten inches deep, and only four inches apart, to keep 
them from drawing, and a flounce of lace or of lisse should be 
put underneath to show in the openings. The front of the bodice 
is round or pointed, with the brocade coming down plainly from 
the shoulders, and the velvet beginning in the side seams and 
pointing to the waist. The open neck is edged by wide trimming 
of pearl and gold spangles on net, with some gold bead fringe or 
wired gold points, in which are set colored stones that look like 
jewels. Mousseiine or lisse is gathered in guimpe fashion in the 
open neck, and drawn around the throat with very simple stand- 
ing frills, or else a band of the jeweled trimming forms a high 
collar. 

A white and silver tulle gown to be worn by a debutante has 
an all-round full skirt of the tulle, bordered at the foot with white 
moire ribbon, with silver scrolls above the ribbon, and sprigs of 
silver scattered all over the skirt and bodice. A trained white 
tulle dress, for a young lady in her second season in society, has 
tiny tassels of white feathers dotting the train of tulle, while the 
straight tablier is gold-spangled silk muslin, with a scalloped bor- 
der at the foot. The white satin waist has gold bullion embroid- 
ery in a design of true-lovers' knots. White tulle trimmed with 
violets in bunches and pendent separately makes a most refined 
gown. Orchids cross a bodice of white satin like an order and 
are set drooping on the front breadths of the tulle skirt. A cream- 
tinted tulle gown has yellow nasturtiums in all their rich shades 
on the left of the bodice and on the right hip, with long grasses 
hanging thence like fringe. 



A sweet little coat of fawn cloth has otter cuffs and cape, the 
latter forming tops that are sometimes called " jockeys " to the 
sleeves; and a cape, called the " Clytie," is a girlish-looking thing, 
with a central V back and front, embroidered with silk and tinsel 
on white cloth, supplemented by a frill, and a deepish cape of 
smoke-grey cloth, with the edge unhemmed or scalloped, but cut 
smoothly off all the way round. It appears to be tied in front 
with long strings and loops of cord that match the embroidery on 
the V-shaped center. 

Closely curled ostrich feathers form a narrow border for edging 
the neck of low black velvet bodices, and a Prince of Wales clus- 
ter of three black feathers is placed on the left shoulder, while 
fouT similar clusters are down the right side of the skirt, which 
may be of tulle, net, or silk muslin. 

Black brocaded satin gowns have tabliers of Iissee or net em- 
broidered in colors or in metals, over an accordion-pleating of 
white, rose, yellow, or mauve satin; the colored satin reappears 
at the top of the brocade bodice in folds or puffs, and the sleeves 
are of the thin fabric." 

Some green and blue hats have been sold, but only in small lots, 
and it is doubtful if either color has what may be properly called 
a " rush." Still a very dark blue may prove popular as the season 
advances. 

No matter how erratic the fold or how the scarf pin is inserted, 
the head of the pin must finally fall in the center of scarf. This is 
authentic and irrevocable. 



Boulanger, the hero of Prance, and the man who, had fate put him 
at the head of that war-like nation, would have so disturbed the 
world's peace that not a European would have deemed his life safe, 
has been reported to have said that we, in America, are the only peo- 
ple who know how to live. And why? Because his friends have 
dined at the Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter street. 



GRAND ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE ! 

MARVELOUS BARGAINS 
SEASONABLE DRY GOODS ! 

According to our regu'ar custom, we begin the New Year with a GRAND 
CLEARANCE SALE OF THE BALANCE OF OUR GREAT WINTER 
STOCK, to make room for heavy consignments of spriug goods, now in 
transit. To accomplish this result quickly we have made a STARTLING 
CUT IN PRICES that embraces every article in every department, thus 
afford 'ug an uuparalleled opportunity for purchasers, as our offerings in- 
clude the LATEST STYLES AND NOVELTIES in 
Cloaks, Wraps, Kew markets, 

Jackets, Jerseys, Shawls, 

Colored Dress (joods, 

Itlack Dress Goods, 

Silks, Satins, Velvets, 
Laces, Ribbons, Trimmings, 

Uloves, Handkerchiefs, 

Ucnts' Furnishing: Goods, 

Corsets, Hosiery, Underwear, 

House Furnishings, etc. 



Note.— All are cordially iuvited to call and inspect our offerings, and 
thus obtain an idea of tne IRRESISTIBLE BARGAINS PRESENTED IN 
EVERY DEPARTMENT. 




MARKET AND JONES STREETS 




ra5s a*' •*• 

©peij Fire pl^ce Xn'mm; 
_J xSp^Wtr. 

f wmpwmu Q 

Q'r^ 3o 9 ,3i.,3i3,3i5:. 

Sjm fRpnciSco. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 1890. 




THE statistics for the year past, so far as compiled, exhibit a 
good degree of prosperity, and a general advance in growth 
in nearly every trade department. The rain fall to date now ap- 
proximates 26 inches, which is considerably more than the aver- 
age of the past, and the expected result thereof is an abundant 
harvest of grain, fruit, etc. 

Our Flour exports for the year by sea aggregate 1,130,950 bbls., 
value, $4,754,589. The leading countries are the United Kingdom, 
with 43-1,429 bbls.; China, 364.489 bbls.; Central America, 130,783 
bbls. The Hawaiian Islands took 45,324 bbls.; Australia, 40,755 
bbls., and the balance scattering, from 29,302 bbls. to Ecuador; 
Japan, 26.203 bbls.; Panama, 16,715 bbls.; Society Islands, 11,962 
bbls,; Asiatic Russia, 11,213 bbls.; Phillipine Isles, 10,250 bbls., 
etc. 

The Wheat and Flour shipment from this port in 1889 combined, 
the Flour being reduced to Grain, aggregated 15,507,925 ctls, value 
$21,395,783, being an increase over 1888 of 1,270,524 ctls. Wheat, 
value $607,699, or the equivalent for the past year of an increase 
of 03,526 short tons. 

Our foreign exports of Mdse. and Produce by sea for 1889 ag- 
gregate $35,05S,922. Of this the United Kingdom took $19,105,- 
536; Hawaii $3,533,053; China $2,656,866; Australia $2,231,9S8; 
Mexico $1,786,990; Central America $1,406,820; Japan and all 
other countries less than$, 1000, 000 each. 

Our Quicksilver receipts in 1889 were 16,264 flasks; in 1888 22,- 
824 flasks; 188,728,055 flasks. Comparative exports for three years 
were: 1889 11,993 flasks; 1888 12,601 flasks: 1887 16,938 flasks; 
present price $57 and $58 per flask. 

The P. M. S. S. Colima, hence for the Isthmus on the 3d inst., 
carried Mdse. and Produce of the value of $88,444. The principal 
shipments were: To Central America — 7,281 bbls. Flour, 2,661 
ctls. Corn, 4,700 lbs. Malt, 7,920 lbs. Tallow, etc.; value, $57,137. 
To Panama— 434 bbls. Flour, 5,826 lbs. Beans, etc.; value, $3,068. 
To Mexico— 800 gals. Wine, 33,075 lbs. Bluestone, 4,010 lbs. Malt, 
50 pes. Machinery; value, $7,639. To Ecuador — 710 bbls. Flour; 
value, $3,081. To New York— 27,427 gals. Wine, 32,120 lbs. Grass 
Seed, 16,411 lbs. Glue, 130 bales Rags, etc.; value, $17,297. 

To Champerico, per Haw. bark Alicia, 15 M ft. Lumber, 15 M 
R. R. Ties, 6 R. R. Cars, 70 kegs Powder and 52 pkgs. Machinery ; 
value, $9,467. 

There does not appear to be any life to the Wheat market, even 
at the low price of $1.27i(ol.30 per ctl. for spot lots, and yet, with 
large stocks on hand, exports are quite free and liberal. 

The steamer Australia, hence for Honolulu on the 3d instant, 
carried in Treasure $25,000, and Merchandise of the value of 
$105,000, leading items of which were 670 bbls. Flour, 20,000 lbs. 
Sugar, 32,000 lbs. Beans, 725 cs. Beer, 949 bales Hay, 1,151 sks. 
Potatoes, 4,500 gals. Wine, 600 pkgs. Salmon, 247 sks. Onions, etc. 
The bkte. W. H. Dimond, for same, carried 852 bbls. Flour, 150 
pkgs. Salmon, 20,000 lbs. Bread, 245 cs. Canned Fruit, 8G6 bdls. 
Shooks, etc. The Planter has arrived from Honolulu, with 12,656 
sks Sugar, 1,100 sks. Rice, 100 bags Coffee, etc. Also S. G. Wilder, 
from same, with 13,111 bags Sugar, and 661 bchs. Bananas. 

Rye for Antwerp. — The Br. ship Peterborough, hence on the 
2d inst., carried 55,273 ctls., value, $57,346. This is a very un- 
usual shipment for us to make, as it is a grain not extensively 
grown on this coast. 

Our comparative receipts and exports of Borax for the past 
three years are as follows: Receipts. 1889, 4,394,900 lbs,; 1888, 
7,313,800 lbs.; 1887, 7,542,500. Exports, 1889, 10,000,000 lbs.; 
1888, 7,S15,187 1bs.; 1887, 10,722,581 lbs. Present price in car load 
lots 6jc. concentrated; refined, 7.1c; powdered, 7ic. per doz. 
Our Coffee receipts in the month of December ( were 3,081 bags, 
while in December, 1888, they were 7,770 bags from Central 
America and 646 from other ports. The present stock in first 
hands, January 1st. 9,033 bags, against 12,870 bags same date the 
year previous. We quote the present price of choice Guatemala, 
21c; good Costa Rica, 21c; unwashed Salvador, 19 Jc. for choice. 
The spot market very inactive. 

The tonnage supply has greatly increased within the week 
past. We note the charters of Br. iron ship Fort George, 1,686 
tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K., Havre or Antwerp, £1 17s.; Br. iron 
bark Hesperides, 1,318 tons, same voyage, £1 17s. 6d., chartered 
in England prior to arrival; ship Alameda, 1,474 tons, now at 
Astoria, Wheat thence, as above, £1 18s. 9d. 

The Steamer Belgic on the 7th inst. sailed for the Orient car- 
rying in treasure $323,853. Of this $129,353 went to China and to 
Japan $144,500. Her cargo to Hongkong consisted of 13,896 bbls. 
Flour, 11,821 lbs. Ginseng, 400 bxs. Pearl Barley, 75,000 lbs. Beans; 
to Japan, 71 bbls of Flour, 44 Rolls Leather, 8,811 lbs. Sugar, 225 
cases Canned Meats and 10,212 lbs. malt. The total value of 
cargo to China, $116,775; to Japan, $15,234. The Belgic also car- 
ried to Manilla, 157 centals Barley, and to the Indies, 60 cases 
canned fruits. 

From Philadelphia we have the ship Servia with 4,395 Steel 
rails and a large cargo of General Merchandise. 



THE DELBECK CHAMPAGNES! 



THE EXTRA 



THE PERFECTION OF A DRY WINE. 





TIE KIN BRUT, 

The highest grade of Champagne without 
sweetness, 



THE BARTON & GUESTIER 

(Established 1735, Bordeaux) 

Clarets, White Wines and Olive Oil. 




JAMES DE FREMERY & CO., - San Francisco. 

General Agents, Pacific Coast. 

MOTHERS ! 

The Largest Stock of Boys' Clothing in the United States. 

All Wear-Resisting, Comfortable and Stylish Fitting Garments. 

Material and make taken into consideration (strictly first- 
class) our prices will be found at least 50 per cent, less than 
the same class of goods can be purchased for elsewhere in 
this city. 

BOYS' CLOTHING DEPARTMENT double its former size. 

M. J. Flavin & Co., 

924 TO 928 IMI.A.iaiCrET STEBET, 
Through to 25 Ellis. 



Interior business solicited. Price lists free on application. Orders 
from the interior filled with care and dispatch. Fall and Winter Catalogue 
now ready. Postoffice bos 1996. 

CANADIAN ANTHRACITE COAL! 



Ho Smoke! No Soot! Clean, Clear, 



Thirty per cent, more heating power thau the bituminous coal sold iu the 
market. Can be burned in any furnace, range, stove or grate with a good 
draught. 

No more blackened ceilings. No holes burned in carpets. Try it and be 



couviuced. 



CANADIAN ANTHRACITE COAL COMPANY, 

Yard. Cor. Second and Braiinan. 

-Telephone No. 1610. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS., Agents. 



Jan. 11, 18M>. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS I.ETTKR. 



23 



CARE OF YOSEMITE. 

SKVF.KAI. montfag ago (In- ftm I.ktter took occasion to point 
nut the vandalism that has been rampant in the 5Fbaetn.it* 
Valley (or years, anil which hurts the place as seriously as the 
eiior'ti.ins once practiced at Niagara Falls inj ared that greatest 
natural enrioaity east ot the Rockies. The responsibility for this 
state of affairs we placed primarily upon the Legislature which 
devised the present wretched method of care for the valley, and 
indirectly upon the Yosemite Commissioners, who have about as 
much fitness for the work as so many men lassoed at random in 
the streets would have. Now comes the CVniiirjf Magazine with a 
strong editorial and several letters, all urging the necessity of re- 
I form in the care of the great valley, whose wonders are recognized 
I as "supreme in American scenery." The letters are contributed 
by George C. Mackenzie, of "The Mariposa Big Tree Grove," by 
Judge Lucius P. Herring, of Sew Haven, and by Robert Under- 
wood Johnson, the associate editor of the Century, who spent sev- 
eral weeks on thecoastlastsummer.and who visited the Yosemite 
! in company with John Muir, the naturalist. The burden of all 
; these letters is that absolutely no scientific care is taken of the 
valley, that no trained forester is employed, and that many un- 
wise things have been done through ignorance or from mercenary 
', motives which it will take years to repair. Judge Derring points 
out, what must have struck any visitor to the valley who is fond 
of walking, and that is the utter lack of good footpaths in the 
valley, or of benches at points from which fine views may be se- 
cured. The whole object of those who have had the laying out 
of paths seems to have been to play into the hands of the people 
; who have saddle-horses to hire. Y'et every pedestrian knows that 
j he gets far better views and takes more comfort on foot than in 
j the saddle. Still, the Yosemite sentiment is like that of the 
j Moor— a man is a pariah unless he is mounted, and he has no 
rights which the horseman should respect. Mr. Johnson, in a 
I letter which is admirable in temper and full of facts that can't be 
blinked, indicates the nuisances which should be abated, and 
points out the simple remedy. Like most tourists of taste, he 
objected to the hotel being flanked by a saloon on one side and a 
pig-sty on the other. He could see no good reason why an un- 
skillful man should have been trusted with the work of trimming 
the trees in the valley, and especially with the opening of a vista 
from the hotel to the great fall; nor why a beautiful grove was 
cut down to make place for hay-fields; nor why brush should be 
left piled against trees, thus putting a premium on their destruc- 
tion by tire. 

No fair-minded observer will say that any of these criticisms 
are unjust or finical. They represent the sentiment of a large 
body of visitors, and coming- as they do with the sanction of a 
great magazine, they ought to have weight with California peo- 
ple. The Century's remedy is to make the Commissioner independ- 
ent of politics, to select men of special fitness for the work, and 
to place the actual care of the valley in the hands of an expert in 
forestry, of whose skill and experience there can be no question. 
We are confident that the State of California can manage the Yo- 
semite Valley as well as the Government manages the Yellow- 
stone Park, but it must get better agents than cranky editors and 
hack politicians, who accept the office of Commissioner for the 
semi-annual free junketing expeditions into the mountains. 

OAKLAND'S INSANITY MILL. 



THE people of Los Angeles, Sierra City and Ukiah, not to 
speak of San Francisco, have a personal interest in the relig- 
ious performances which the Oakland authorities permit to con- 
tinue week after week in the Woodworth tent. They all help to 
put up the taxes which pay for the maintenance of the patients 
in the State insane asylums. From present indications it is the 
intention of Mrs. Woodworth to reserve all the accommodations 
at Napa and Stockton for her converts, leaving none for the peo- 
ple who want to be appointed Postmaster of San Francisco and 
the farmers who have been told that rainy weather is good for the 
crops. Providence blew down the female evangelist's lunatic fac- 
tory a short time ago, but she promptly put up a bigger one and 
Providence has not yet called the bluff. The other day a girl four- 
teen years old lay in a deathlike trance for four hours in the cold 
air on the platform upon which Mrs. Woodworth is accustomed 
to pile up her human trophies, and when her guardian tried to 
carry her away the mob of converts threw him out of the tent 
and he had to go for the Chief of Police. The Chief made the 
saints give up the girl, but he did nothing more. It may be a 
matter of small importance to Oakland whether its large supply 
of half balanced minds be totally unbalanced or not, but if 
it is going to authorize the process on the extensive scale upon 
which Mrs. Woodworth is carrying it on it ought at least to make 
some arrangements for supporting its own patients in its own 
asylums. That much the rest of the State has a right to de- 
mand. A commonwealth that has just appropriated $2,500,000 
for new asylum buildings cannot afford to have all its space 
monopolized by the output of a single tent. If Oakland would 
send up Mrs. Woodworth herself, nobody would complain. 

Marsh & Co., under the Palace Hotel, keep the most extraordi- 
nary variety of Japanese curios, which are perfect gems. 




Bihks — I'm elad you have gotten your liver in active service again, and 
have returned to French dinners. 

Jinks — Yes, I was cut out of French dinners for nearly a year. No use 
talking, they wear out a liver and stomach very soon. But the jEtna 
Mineral Waters with my dinners have brought me around again all right, 
and I can now eat as heartily as before. 

Dr. David Wooster, the eminent physician of 746 Mission street, writes: 
I have used the Mta& Mineral Waters in my practice for some time, and 
cordially recommend it as one of the very best natural mineral waters in 
the market, as a daily drink. For disturbances in the functions of the liver 
and kidneys it is unsurpassed. 

K".A- GEEAT S-A/VHETO-." 1/ 
THE COMPLETE CODE. I\. 

For the use of Agents, Bankers, Brokers, Shippers, etc., etc., and the tele- 
graphing public. 



By w. 



S UTH BRLAN D. 



Published by BYRE AND SPOTTISWOODB, Her Majesty's Printers 
London, E. C; and E. & J. B. YOUNG & CO., Cooper Union, New York. 
Paris Agency — " Journal des Mines," 26 Rue Cambon. 

10 Draper's Gardens, E. C. 
Dear Sir: The " K. K. Code " is the best I have ever used. 

Faithfully yours, F. B. Behr. 

DUTTON & PARTRIDGE, 

214 California St., S. F., 
Agents for Pacific Coast. 



a-, w. CL-AJR/is: sc oo., 

653 Market Street, 

FOR 

WALL PAPE R, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 

ESTABLISHED 1854. 

GEORGE MORROW & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

HZ-A.1T JLILnTID C3- IR, Jl. X 1ST . 
PRIVATE trade solicited. 

39 Clay Street, - - - San Francisco. 



Fine Table §<p 
WINES «6 



From our Celebrated 

ORLEANS VINEYARD 




Producers 
of the 



ESM£SE 

Champagne 

630 WASHINGTON ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



General iiseneieB 

NEW YORK 
P1SI & TTLPOPJ), 917 Broidw»T 

PHILADELPHIA 
t. P. DEIST 1 CO, 25 8. Tenth Street 

CHICAGO 

I. JEV5E & CO., 110 Midison Street 

ST. PAUL 
0. JEV1II & CO., 1U I. Third Street 

DETROIT 

G. i S. McMU/Lli, 131 Wooderd ATeaut 

CINCINNATI 
JOS. IL PEEBLES SOUS' CO., Pile'i Bldg. 

HONOLULU 
BaUITOK JOHHSOI 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 1889 




TWO gentlemen of Batch lineage have just arrived in London 
upon an errand with an exceedingly pleasing prospect in view, 
says the London Court Journal. They claim to be the lineal de- 
scendants of Hermann von Hake, who, having settled in this 
country early in the century, died intestate fifty years ago, leav- 
ing a very large property. The property, now estimated at over 
a million sterling, went, in the natural course of events, to the 
Crown. But the newly-arrived Dutchmen are armed with docu- 
mentary evidence that they are the rightful heirs. When Her- 
mann died he had a nephew living in Holland, who died in igno- 
rance of the good fortune that had attended his uncle in England. 
Two sons of this nephew emigrated to America, where they also 
lived and died in ignorance of their heirship to the estate in Eng- 
land. They left four sons, who now want their great uncle's 
money, with compound interest, and they have secured the ser- 
vices of a firm of London solicitors who are prepared to urge their 
demand. 



This is how we are libeled by our neighbors across the herring- 
pond, for according to a London paper it is satisfactory to find 
the Americans coming to some conclusion as to who is entitled to 
be called colonel. It has been settled by " competent authority," 
we are told, that the class of colonels includes every man who 
conducts a large distillery, every prominent railroad official, every 
Congressman, every man with a Government office, every great 
editor, the chief of the Police Department, and every man who 
arrived at the rank of captain during the Civil War. The re- 
strictions placed on the use of the title, it will be observed, are 
even now none too narrow. The colonels will still bear a very re- 
spectable proportion to the total population of the United States; 
but if " competent authority " means authority which can be en- 
forced, it should now be possible to meet an occasional American 
who is not a colonel. 

A new French torpedo cruiser has lately been completed for 
sea, which, in point of speed and general seaworthiness, appears 
to surpass anything that we have ourselves yet produced, is the 
comment of an English paper. The new craft, named the Agile, 
has maintained a sea-going speed of 21 J knots an hour, and has 
been able to use her torpedo tubes at that high rate, two matters 
of some importance — in fact, of vital importance — to the utility 
of the ship, and to secure which our own constructors have hith- 
erto striven in vain. It may be unpalatable, but it is a fact that 
in the old days of the great wars the French war vessels captured 
and incorporated with the English Navy were the best ships of 
the fleet, and it does seem now that if we have the greatest num- 
ber of ships our neighbors can build better. 

The Hospital Gazette says it is a fact that has been of late only 
too painfully apparent to every "practitioner of medicine " that 
the "morphia habit" is fast growing upon society. In Russia, 
we understand, the morphine party is the latest development of 
the passion that prevails in St. Petersburg. The idea is scarcely 
a novel one, for in Turkey and Asia Minor hashish eating and 
opium smoking parties have from time immemorial been of com- 
mon occurrence. 



An Austrian officer, of the name of Pedragovics, has constructed 
a new repeating-rifie of small calibre, said to be superior to any 
invention of the kind hitherto made. Its construction is similar 
to that of the Mannlicher gun, but it is very much more simple 
in its details. It is said that the Italian Government have deter- 
mined to adopt this weapon for the Army, and that 200,000 of 
the rifles are to he constructed as soon as possible. 

The Kew Museum in Dublin is finished, and has been handed 
over to the Science and Art Department. Both this building and 
the National Library will be open to the public early in spring. 
The cost of both buildings has bean about £120,000, and they 
have given the greatest satisfaction to the authorities and the pub- 
lic. 

The Ephemeris, of Athens, reports that a number of coffers, con- 
taining 30,000 gold and silver Spanish pieces of the year 1666, 
have been hauled out of the sea near the island of Andros. Six 
bronze cannons were found near the coffers. It is thought that 
the whole came from the wreck -ofa Spanish man-of-war. 

Mr. Bernard Quaritch, the noted London bibliopole, intends dur 
ing the month to hold an exhibiton inNew York, Boston, Chicago, 
and Philadelphia of what he calls " the rarest and costliest gems 
of his literary and artistic regalia.*' 



The terror of the Sultan, when he heaTd-the particulars of the 
Brazilian revolution, led him at. once to distribute a large sum 
among his Albanian and Nubian Guards, and- the arrears of pay 
which are due to the Turkish Army are to be paid off at once. 

■ ■ 'C- r— ~^ ? * " ', 



ST. MATTHEW'S HALL, 

San Mateo, California. 

A SCHOOL FOR BOYS ! 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR. 



IE ALFRED LEE BREWER, M, I Rector. 



tW SEND FOR CATALOGUE.il 

MATTHIAS GEAY CO, 

206 Post Street, 

General Agents for the Celebrated 

STEINWAY & SONS' PIANOS ! 

(the best in the world). 
Ernest Gabler Pianos, 

Kranich & Bach Pianos, 
C. Roenisch Pianos, 
C. D. Pease & Co.'s Pianos. 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 
San Francisco. 

.A. CJT7IET HOME, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 

PARKE & LACY CO., 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IRON WORKING MACHINERY. 

ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING, OIL8 AND SUPPLIES. 

J. W. GIRVIN & CO., 

RUBBER AND LEATHER BELTING, 

HOSE, PACKING, ETC., 
RUBBER CLOTHING, BOOTS, SHOES, ETC. 

DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES. 
2 and 4 California St. , San Francisco, Cat. 

DR. POSEY 

HAS REMOVED HIS OFFICE TO 

40i GEARY STREET, BETWEEN KEARNY AND DUPONT. 

Eye, Ear, Throat, Nose and Gullet. 

Hours— 10 to 3; Sunday, 10 to 12. 

REMEMBER THIS I 
Terry <St Co.. of Market street 
Every one knows cannot be beat; 
Rarest of value here we gain, 
Remember, your furniture here obtain; 
Your bedding, carpets and stoves get here, 
A for cash or installments thro" the year. 
Come here for bargains, as-all should know 
Our furniture dealersare Terry & Co. 

747 and 749 Market Street, 

Opposite Grant Avenue. 



Jan. 11, 1890. 



3A1N PB INCIS< u \i;\\ s I.KTTKK. 



THE BOURSE AND UNDERWRITER. 

Califouiu drusr, January LI, i 

BhTTWKKN the Lai and Iflth <>f January, the position <>f [near- 
an.- sated. In underwriting eyes, 

with an awful grandeur. It is f->r li is edification that Sleepless 
nJgb.ni are parsed, for him that figures are added ami multiplied. 
II- b the arbiter on surpluses, the umpire on assets. Hia unim- 
portance between times la lost sight of, ami be becomes an indi- 
viduality of supreme interest. The fact is. that during this week 
insurance men have been so busily engaged in preparing state- 
ments that they have DOt given any matter for gossip. The re- 
sulta of the year's business have to be in at the office of the In- 
surance Commissioner by the L5th, and there is a fine of $100 per 
day for every company that is not filed by that date. Now, 
hundred dollars are infrequent in these days, and no corporation 
is likely to be behind hand. Of course, after the statements have 
been filed, the Insurance Commissioner is compelled to examine 
carefully the list of each one's assets and liabilities, to see that 
excessive valuations are not placed on real estate holdings, and to 
convince himself that all the securities represented are in their 
places. He is supposed, also, to convince himself of the stability 
and solvency of the other companies doing business on this coast, 
but that is information he invariably takes at second hand, un- 
less, of course, he happens to desire a trip, whereupon he obtains 
the knowledge at first hand, and by personal inquiry. The posi- 
tion of Insurance Commissioner in this peaceable and prosperous 
community is not fraught with either great labors or great dan- 
gers. He is an officer for an emergency, and these only occur at 
long intervals. For instance, should the present year turn out as 
badly as the past one, he would come into play with tremendous 
effect, his name would be in the niouths of even babies and suck- 
lings, he would be a factor in the community instead of ornament. 

The Compact seems to have had considerable success with the 
very lively local agents at Oakland. These gentlemen, as I have 
informed you on previous occasions, are very decided rate dis- 
turbers. They got a taste of their own quality, however, and are 
now disposed to be repentant. When the reduction in rates was 
ordered by Manager Stillman the home agencies had risks offered 
them by the score at the new tariff. They accepted them, right 
and left, to such an extent that alarm seized the minds and spirits 
of the Athenians, and they came to time. They announced an 
unconditional surrender, and now they have signed an ironclad 
agreement, binding them to maintain rates at all hazards. This 
action has given a good deal of satisfaction on this side of the 
bay, as it is the first time in many years that Oakland affairs have 
been in a satisfactory condition. It is learned, on good authority, 
that the General Agent of the New Zealand Insurance Company 
has notified his agents at Los Angeles and Oakland not to main- 
tain the agreement which both signed. The one result of such an 
order will be to precipitate more trouble, and goodness knows 
there has been enough of this within the past few months. If 
the General Agent of this antepodian Company does not look out 
he will find himself in a hole. New Zealand securities are not 
now in a condition to stand examination, and an investigation of 
the capital stock of this Company might develop some very 
strange things. As is well known, the New Zealand Insurance 
Company is an offshoot of the Bank of New Zealand, and any 
one can find out how that institution stands by a glance at recent 
Colonial papers. 

Rudolph Herold has been appointed General Agent of the 
Hamburg, Bremen and Niagara insurance companies. The old 
firm consisted of Speyer and Herold. 

The impairment of the Armstrong Fire Insurance Company 
is purely a technical one. The capital is all intact, and the im- 
pairment is merely in the re-insurance reserve. The New York 
Commissioner has not declared the company ineligible for busi- 
ness in New York city, as the impairment of its capital did not 
amount to quite 20 per cent., which New York law allows. In 
California the law is that a company be allowed to have an im- 
pairment of its capital to the amount of 20 per cent., but must 
not get below $200,000. Not one dollar impairment is allowed in 
California below this figure. The Armstrong Mutual has a capital of 
$200,000,so any impairment would prevent its doing business here. 

The following comparative table has been made up from the 
report of the examiners of the Mutual Fire Insurance Company 
of New York from the statement made by Mr. Armstrong in Oc- 
tober and the annual Statement for the year ending Dec. 31, 1888: 
Nov. 30, 1889. Jan. 1, 1889. Oct. 1, 1889 

Assetts $1,400,689 79 $1,488,105 33 $1,356,428 39 

Liabilities (exclusive of scrip) . 1,085,870 45 815,077 90 919,045 75 



Surplus $314,819 34 $673,088 43 $437,382 64 

Unpaid Losses vj57,0s)4 08 73,845 50 148,862 S-i 

Unearned Premiums 477,942 21 356,028 05 433,117 37 

Borrowed money 70,000 00 110,000 00 Not Giveu 

Scrip of 1887 $242 277 

Scripofl888 199,058 

Jau. 1, 1889. 
$451,078 

The business of the South British Insurance Company has 
grown to such an extent in the middle territory that Manager 
Murray has decided to have the local agents report to this city. 
A new special will soon be put in this field. Secretary. 



Nov. 30.1SS9. 
Total dividend scrip outstanding $441,335 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Best and Belcher Mining Company. 
Uion of principal place ol business— San Frauulsco, California Loca- 
tion ol works— Virginia City, Store; County, Nevada, 

Notice la hereby given that at o otlng of the Board of Directors held 

on Houday, the sixth (6th) dav ..I January, 1890, an assessment (No 46) of 
rweutj ove Cents (26c) per share was levied npon the capital stock of the 
corporation, payable Immediately In United States gold coin to the Secre- 
tary, at the office or the Company, room 69, Nevada Block, No. 303 Montgom- 
ery Btreet, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock npon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
f hursday^the Ih rteenlh <1 3lh) day ol Februa y. 1890. will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public unction: and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will he sold OU I'HUJRSDAY, the sixth (lith) day of March 1890, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

„-„„„, !>• (JSBORN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 39, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, Sau Fraucisco 
California. ' 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Seg. Belcher and Mides Consolidated Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— Sau Francisco, California Lo- 
cation of works—Gold Hill Mining District, Storey County, S ate of Nevada 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors held 
on the 4th day of January, 1890, an assessment (No. 5) of l'weuty-flve'Ceuts 
(2oc) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation payable 
immediately iu United States gold coin, to the Secretary at the office of 
the Company, room 4, Nevada Block, No. 30y Montgomery street Sau Fran- 
cisco, California, ' 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The sixth (6th) day of February, 1899. will bs delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the twenty-sixth (26th) day of February 
1890, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. E. B. HOLMES, Secretary. 

Office— Room 4, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street Sau Fran- 
cisco, California. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Mayflower Gravel Mining Company. 

Location of priucipal place of business— San Francisco, California Loca- 
tion of works— Forest Hill, Placer Couutv, California. 

Notice is herebygiveu thatata meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the '27th day of December, 1S89, an assessment (No. 45) of Fifty Cents (50c) 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation "payable im- 
mediately in I'nited States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, 328 Montgomery street, room 24, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 3d day of Februa y, 1890, will be delinquent, 
aud advertised for sale at public auction ; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, Will be sold ou TUESDAY, the 25th day of February, 18*. to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and expenses 
of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

„„„ „ , J- MOKIZIO, Secretary. 

Office— 328 Montgomery street, room 24, San Francisco, California 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Exchequer Mining Company. 

Locatiou of principal place of business— Sau Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the 16th day of December, 1889, an assessment (No. 28} of Twenty-five 
(25) Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary at the 
office of the Company, room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street 
San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The Twenty-first day of January, 1890, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the eleventh day of February, 1890 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

_ ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Overman Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— Sau Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 31st day of December, 1889, an assessment (No. 61) of Twenty-five 
Cents per share was levied upou the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately iu United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at 
the office of the Company, No. 414 California street, Sau Fraucisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 5th day of February, 1890, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; aud unless pavraent is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 26th day of February, 1*90, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

GEO. D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 

Office— No. 414 California streat, Sau Francioco, California, 




Caligraph Type Writer, 



Rapid and Latest 



Writing Machine Supplies. 
THE SAMUEL HILL COMPANY, 

General Agents, 
29 JSew Montgomery Street 

San Fbancisco. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 1890. 




New York, January 2, 1890. 

MR. and Mrs. Thomas Fitch are stopping at the Barrett House 
in this city, having just come over from Washington. Mrs. 
Fitch has been lying seriously ill for several weeks and is in the 
hands of her physician. • 

Mr, and Mrs. Joseph English are at the Hoffmann House where 
they expect to remain throughout the winter. 

Senator John P. Jones arrived a few days since from Washing- 
ton and was joined at the Hoffmann by his son Roy. who returned 
to Harvard on the day after New Year's. Senator Jones will be 
in town for a fortnight. Mr. Charles Reinhart and Mr. George 
Rowan are two more San Franciscans who select the Hoffman 
as their New York residence. 

Edgar Kelley is out in a weird and powerful love story in the 
Christinas number of the American Musician. He is attaining al- 
most as much literary as musical prestige in New York, and is 
looked upon as one of the best musical critics here. 

Mr. Irving Scott and Mr. George A. Knight were the guests, one 
night this week, of the poetess of passion, Mrs. Ella Wheeler 
Wilcox, and Mr. Wilcox. Their meeting was a curious one. It 
appears that Mrs. Wilcox has been very much interested in the 
history of the attempted murder of his wife, Erol Goode Wright, 
by her husband, W. C. Wright, in San Francisco a few months 
ago. Mrs. Wright was, it will be remembered, attempting to ele- 
vate her husband's mind by reading aloud to him the " Poems of 
Passion," and it was upon her reaching the climax of that very 
tropical effusion, " Dalilab," that the infuriated husband drew his 
revolver upon his offending spouse and fired four shots in quick 
succession at the literary companion of his joys and sorrows. 
Mr. Knight was attorney for the defense, and you no doubt recol- 
lect his statement that the assault was justifiable, and that any 
one who read Ella Wheeler Wilcox deserved to be shot. 

This pleasing sally of Mr. Knight had, it seems, reached the 
ears of the erotic poetess, who persuaded Mr. Scott to present 
him that she might wreak vengeance. Mr. Knight's gallant ex- 
pressions of enthusiasm, and his assurance that he had spent 
hours of unalloyed delight in reading Miss Wilcox's poems, fell, 
therefore, somewhat flat upon that lady's ears, and she replied 
with some warmth that Mr. Knight's speech scarcely indicated 
that appreciation he asserted. 

In the course of the conversation, the fair poetess was still 
more discomfited, for on inquiring whether one of the bullets had 
not Battened upon Mrs. Wright's skull, Mr. Wilcox assured his 
wife solemnly, that that would explain the lady's enthusiasm for 
" Palilah." The interview ended amicably, however, and Mrs. 
Wilcox is wiiling to admit that there is one Californian who does 
not travel with a scalping knife. 

Mrs. Richardson Clover nee Eudora Miller, was one of the group 
of ladies in the Blue Room at the White House on New Year's 
day. Mrs. Clover was a belle in Washington during the Arthur 
administration and has been heartily welcomed into the ranks of 
young matrons at the Capital since her determination to winter 
there. 

v Mrs. Justice Field kept " open house " as usual, with a bevy of 
young ladies about her, among them her neices the Misses 
Condit-Smith. 

Mr. and Mrs. Estee oscillate between New York and Washing- 
ton as actively as Irving Scott and Senator Jones. The Clunies 
were over in New York during the week. 

All society is agog to-night over the New Y'ear's ball at the 
Metropolitan Opera House. Many of the supper arrangements 
weTe altered at the last moment, owing to the civil announcement 
that the excise law would be strictly Qfiforced. This law pro- 
hibits wine after one o'clock. It seems to vulgarize the ball in 
the minds of many people, who think the municipal laws should 
discriminate between the Four Hundred and the four thousand. 
The arrangements for the ball are faultless, and Ward McAllister 
reaches the zenith of social fame to-night. The attendance is 
almost entirely of New York people, although a few guests from 
outside cities have received cards. The only San Franciscan 
whom I know is among the guests, is Miss Ida Scooffy, who 
wears an exquisitely simple costume of gold colored tulle. Mrs. 
Sharon is among the invited guests. 

Senator Hearst has just enrolled on the new year list for 1890 a 
colt and a filly— the former, by Warwick, is called Warpath, the 
filly, Fireworks. Both are down at Sheepshead Bay under Matt 
Bergen. Tkix. 



Who puts the sight uuto the best, 
And works for all with zeal aud zest, 
Above all others, as confessed ? 



This is the time to lay in a stock of new neckties, and for them go 
to J. W. Carmany tt Co., 25 Kearny street. 

For Coughs and Throat Disorders use Brown's Bronchial Tro- 
ches—" Have never changed my mind respecting them, eveept I think 
belter of that which I began thinking well of."— V?< ;v. Benry Ward !■•■ cher. 
Sold only in boxes. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank, 
805 Market Street, corner of Fourth Stree . 
For the half year ending December 31, 1889, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five aud fifty-two hundredths (5.52) on term deposits, and four 
and sixty hundredths <4.tiu) on ordinary deposits, for the entire term of de- 
posit, and free of all taxes, payable on and after January 2, 1890. 

D. 8. PORN, Actiug Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society, 
526 California Street. 
For the half year ending December 31st, 1889, a dividend has been de- 
clared atthe rate of five and forty hundredths (5 40 100) per cent, per annum 
on Term Deposits and four and oue-nalf (4V 2 ) per cent, per annum ou Or- 
dinary Deposits, pavable on aud after Thursdav, January 2, 1890. 

__^ GKO. TOUKNY. Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and L^an Society, 
Corner of Powell aud Eddy Streets. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1839, a divideud has been declared 
at the rate of five and fifty eight hundredths (5 58- 100) percent, per aunum on 
Term Deposits, and four aud sixty-five hundredths (4 t>5 100) per cent, per 
aunum on Ordinary Deposits, free of tax, and payable on aud after THUK.S- 
DAY, Jauuary2, 1890. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

619 Clay Street. 

For tne half year ending December 31, 1889, a divideud has been declared 

at the rate of five and one-tenth (5 1-10) per ceut. per annum, ou all deposits, 

free of taxes, and payable ou and after THURSDAY, Jauuary 2, 1890. 

. CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 

N. E. Corner Montgomery aud Post Sts., 

San Francisco, January 2, 1890. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of 4 1 4 per ceut, per annum on 
all deposits for the six mouths eudiug December 31, le89, free from all taxes, 
aud payable from and after this date. 

R. J. TOB1N, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

North Star Mining company. 
Dividend No. 5 (of fiity cents per share) of the North Star Mining Com- 
pany, will be payable at the office of the Compauy, 401 California street. 
San'Fiauciaco, ou and after MONDAY, December 30, 1889. Transfer books 
will be closed from ueceuiber 27th to December 31, 188y. 

DAVID A. JENNINGS, Secretary. 
Note.— Dividend on stock issued in New York payable at the Transfer 
Office of the Compauy, No. 18 Wall Street, New York. 
San Francisco, December 27, 1839. 

"dividend notice. 

Office of the Con. California and Virginia Mining Company, 

San Francisco, Jauuary 4, 1890. 
At a meeting of the Board of Directors of the above-named Company, 
held thih day, divideud No. 32, of T^euty-five Cents (25c.) per share, was 
declared, payable on FRIDAY, January 10, 1890. 

A. W. HAVENS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company. 

Dividend No. 24 (Thirty Cents per share) of the Hawaiian Commereia 
aud Sugar Company, will be payable at the olfice of the Compauy, 327 
Market street, on aud after SATCKDAY, February 1, 1S90. Transfer books 
will close Saturday, Jauuarv 2-th, 1890, at 12 o'clock m. 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND No. 172. 

The Home Mutual Insurance Company 
Will pay its regular mouthly dividend of oue dollar ($l)per share upon its 
capital stock on Jauuarv 10, 1890. 

CHARLES R. STORY, Secretary. 



J3uy your 

'tfeclric 

A""> LIGHT 

JTXTURES 

TOOIRECT FROMTHE 
^UFACTUf^EKS 

THOMAS DAY & CO.™ 








s\\ PR wriNi) NEWS LETTER. 



27 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY 
pacific n 

Trams L*»vc and *rr Due to Arrive «t 

SAN FRANCISCO 

leave I From December I, J8B9. I auivi 

littr. 

■ u r. 
i ig p. 



OBITUARY. 



7 JO a. !Uyw*M*. KUea and San Jom 

730 a. Jirrtm'tOA Redding. vU l>avis 

7 so a. Btcrttmftnto, Auburn, Colfax. 

6:00a. Mdrtiu*?!, VhIU-jm. ri*n>t"fi* aud 

Sunt* K<>.-» 
$.30*. Los Aucole- Extract, Fresno, 

iUkc^fleM. Mojaveand Bast, 

ati>l 1 
8:30a. Nile*. Sau Jose, Stockton, lone, 

Sscranieuto, MarvsviUe, Oro- 

rtlleand Bed Bluff 

1030 a. HsywArd* ami Nllea 

1:2 -oo*. Haywarda, Miles and San Jose 

•I^Op. Sacramento River Steamers 
3 00 P. Hjtyward.-. Nile.- aud Sau Jose 
3:30 P. Spend Class for Uedeii & Bast 
4:00p. Stockton and $Miltou; Yallejo, 

<ali?toga and Santa Rosa. 
4:30 p. Sacramento aud Kuight's Laud- 
ing via Uaria 

•4:30 P. Niles aud Livermore 

•4:30 P. Miles and Sau Jose 

5:30p. Havwards and Miles. 
6.00p. Sunset Koute. Atlantic Express, 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 
Demi ng. El Paso, Mew Orleans 
and Ea^t 
7:00 p. Shasta Route Express. Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Redding, Port- 
laud, Puget Sound and East 
8:00 p. Central Atlantic Express, Ogden 
and East. 

Santa Cruz Division. 



45 p. 
;16 p. 

.45 P. 
:00a. 

15 A. 

45 P. 



:45a. 
45 a. 
15 P. 
45A 



:45 a. 
1:45 a. 



20 P. 

.50 P. 
50A. 
:50 a. 



13 00a. Hunters Train to San Jose. 17 

8:15a. Newark, Centerville. Sau Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz ... 5: 

*2:1op. Centerville, San Jose, Felton, 

Boulder Creek A Santa Cruz *11 
4:15 p. Centerville. San Jose, Almaden 

and LosGatos 9 

Coast Division (Third a d Townsend Streets). 
7:25a. San Jose, Almaden and Way 

Stations 2: 

8:30a. San Jose. Gilroy.Tres Piuos, Pa- 
jaro. Santa Cruz, Monterey, 
Paci6e Grove. Salinas, Sau 
Miguel, Paso Robles and Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) & 

principal Way Stations 6 

10:30a. San Jnse, and Way Station? . 5 

12:01 p. Cemeterv, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations. 3:38 p. 

•3:30 p. San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, PacificGrove 
and principal Way Stations. *10:00a. 
*4:20p. Menlo Park aud Way Stations... *7:58a. 
5:20 p. Sau Jose aud Way Stations .. 9:03 A 

6:30 p. Menlo Park and Way Stations. . . 6:35 A. 
fll:45p. Menlo Park and principal Way 

Stations. +7:28_p. 

a. for Morning. p. for A fternoon . 

•Sundays excepted. -{-Saturdays ouly. 

JSundays only. ^Saturdays excepted. 

**Mondays excepted. 



12 P. 
02 P. 



PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers MEXICO and UMATILLA direct 
for VICTORIA, B. C, and Pt GET SOUND ports, 
at 9 a. M. every Friday. 

The steamer UMATILLA, sailing every other 
Friday, at 9 A. M., connects at Port Townsend 
with Steamers IDAHO and ANCON for Alaska. 

For PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
the O. R. AND N. CO., every four days. 

FOR SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, San 
Simeon, Cayucos, Port Harford, San Luis Obis- 
po, Gaviota, Santa Barbara, San Buenaven- 
tdra, hueneme, san pedro, los angeles and 
San Diego, about every second day. 

For EUREKA. ARCATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, Tuesday, at 9 a. m.— LOS ANGELES. 

Fob POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, etc., every 
Monday and Thursday, at 4 p. m. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 214 Montgomery street, 
Near Pine. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'] Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

A- BUSWELL, 

Book-Binder, Piuicr-Raler, Printer unci Blank Book manufac- 
turer, 
535 Clay Street, - Near Montgomery, 

San Francisco. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal. Paris, 1878. 
O^These Pens are "the best in the world." 
Sole Agent for United States, MR.HY.HOE. 91, 
John Street, N. Y. Sold by all Stationers. 



THE death of Mrs. John Bensley at Hoi 
Springs, n. \|., whicta occurred on De- 
cember 30th, was heard with universal re- 
gret, M rs. Bensley was a must distinguished 
woman and a profound scholar. She con- 
versed in five different languages, and was 
well versed in Greek and Latin. .She was 
married to the late John Bensley pn Sep- 
tember L6, 1869, and was then Mrs. Marian 
Louise Jeannette Macdonald Eveline Gre- 
ville, widow of the Hon. George Greville of 
England, She was a direct descendant of 
the Mc Alpine family of Clan McAlpine. 

ASSEMBLYMAN John R. Brierly, of Los 
Angeles, better known as " Dad" Bri- 
erly, died last Monday at the residence of 
his brother-in-law. G. W. Tarleton, at San 
Jose. General Brierly was well known 
throughout the State as an adroit politician, 
and was regarded as the most sarcastic 
speaker that had ever sat in a California 
Legislature. He was fifty years old, and 
came to this coast in 1862. 

THE death of W. A. Mix, in Oakland, last 
Monday, was heard with much regret 
by his numerous friends. The deceased bad 
led a very stirring life. He was a veteran 
of the Mexican war, and had been with 
Colonel Wright in his expedition against 
the Indians in Washington. He was a 
member of the Vigilance Committee of 1856, 
and was officer of the day when the late 
David S. Terry was arrested for stabbing 
Hopkins. He was sixty-four at the time 
of his death. 

THE death of Captain John N. Ingalls 
last Wednesday was most unexpected. 
The deceased was in the service of the Pa- 
cific Coast Steamship Company, and for the 
past three years commanded the Santa Rosa. 
Captain Ingalls was a good seaman, and a 
favorite with all he came into contact. He 
was also a good business man, and was 
part owner in several schooners trading 
along the coast. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 



VAN NESS SEMINARY. 




A Day and Boarding-School for Young Ladies. 

1333 PINE STREET, S. F. 

The n>xt Term opens January 6, 1890. 
OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 
Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST AND BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 o'clock p. M.. for YOKO- 
HAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yoko- 
hama with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer. 1889. 

Gaelic Saturday, December 14. 

—1890— 

Belgic.. ... Tuesday, January 7. 

Oceanic Tuesday, February 4. 

Gaelic Thursday, February 27. 

Belgic Saturday, March 22. 

Oceanic 'J uesday, April 15. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 
Cabin Plans ou exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, or at 
No. 202 Market street{Union Block)San Francisco. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
GEO. H. RICE, Traffic Manager. 



"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE." 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 1R89. aud 
until further notice, Boats aud Traius will 
leave from and arrive at the Sau Francisco Pas- 
senger Depot, MARKET-STREET WHARF, as 

follows: 



Lkavl* S. F. 




Arrive inS. F. 


Da""! |S"mlay s 


Destination. 


Sundaysj ™ 


7:40a. y. 8:00a.m. 
3:30 p. y. 15:00 p. m. 
5:00p.m.| .. 


Petaluma 

aud 

Santa Rosa. 


10:40 a.m 8:60a.m. 

6:10p.u;10:30a.h 

. ..1 6:06P.M. 



7:40a.m. 
3:30 P.M. 



Fulton I 

Windsor, 

Healdsburg, 

8:00a.m. Litton Niirinirs, 6:10p.M 

Cloverdale & 

Way Stations. 



7:40a.m. 8:00a. m 



8:00 a. m. 



7:40 a. m. 
5:00 p.m. 



Hoplaud 
and Ukiah. 



6:10 p. m. 



Guerneville. 16 :10p. m. 



ft-nn * m Sonoma aud I10:40a..m. 8:50a. m. 
L,M - Glen Ellen, i 6:10p.m. 6:05p.m. 



10:30a. m 
6:05p.m 



Stages couueet at Santa Rosa for White Sulphur 
Springs, Sebastopol and Mark West Springs; at 
Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, at CloYerdale for 
the Geysers, at Hopland for Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport aud Bartlett 
Springs, and at Ukiah for Viohy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs, Blue Lakes, Willits, Cahto, Capella, 
Potter Valley, Sherwood Valley and Meudociuo 
City. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, $1 50, to Santa Rosa, $2 25: to 
Healdsburg, $3 40; to Litton Springs, $3.60: to Clo- 
verdale, $450; to Guerueville, $3.75; to Sonoma, 
$1.50: to Glen Ellen, $1.80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sunday only— 
To Petaluma, $1; to Santa Rosa, $1 50; to Healds- 
burg, $2.25; to Litton Springs, $2 40: to Cloverdale, 
$3: to Guerneville, $2.50; to Sonoma, $1; to Glen 
Ellen, $1.20. 

From San Francisco for Point Tiburon aud San 
Rafael, Week Days— 7:40, 9:20, 11:20 A. M. ; 3:30, 5:00, 
6:15 p.m. Sundays— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. ; 1:30, 500 
6 :20 p. M. 

To San Francisco from San Rafael, Week Days— 
6:20,7:55,9:30 A. M.; 12;45, 3:40, 5:05 p. M. Sundays— 
8:10, 9:40 a.m.; 12:15, 3:40, 5:00 p. m. 

To Sau Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week 
Days— 6:50, 8:20, 9:55 A. M. ; 1:10, 4:05, 5:30 p. M. 
Sundays— 8:40. 10:05 A. M. ; 12:40, 4:05, 5:30 p. M. 

Ou Saturdays an extra trip will be made from 
Sau Francisco to San Rafael, leaving at 1:40 p. M. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

*»-TICKET OFFICES-A! Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and No. 2 New Montgomery Street. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 
For New York via Panama, 

S. S. San Bi.as Monday, January 13, 1S90, 

at 12 o'clock noon, 
Taking freight aud passengers dire' t for— 
Mazatlau, Sau Bias, Manzanillo, Acapulco, Sau 
Jose de Guatemala, La Libertad and Panama, 
aiid via Acapulco for all Lower Mexican and 
Central American ports. 

For Hongkong via Yokohama, 

City of Peking Thursday, January 21, 1890, 

at 3 f. m. 

City of Kio de Janeiro — Saturday, Feb. 15, 1890, 

at 3 p. m. 

China ,, Tuesday, March 11, 1890, 

at 3 p. m. 
Kound-Trip Tickets to Yokohama and return at 
reduced rates 
For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, cor- 
ner Firstand Brannan streets. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

Agents. 
Geqbg-e H. Ri ce, Traffic Manager. 

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. S., Hawaiian and Colonial Mails. 

Will leave the Company's Wharf, Mission Street, 
No. 1, 

For Honolulu: 
S. S. Australia (3,000 tons), Jan. 31, 1890, at 12 m. 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 
Sydney, Without Change: 
The Splendid New 3,000-ton Iron Steamer 

Alameda Saturday, January 1L, 1890, at 12 m 

Or immediately on arrival of Che English mails. 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 
ket street. 

JOHN D. SPBECKELS & BROS., 
General Agents. 



?& 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 11, 1890. 




THE main feature of interest in the European situation is the 
intelligence relating to England and Portugal in Africa. The 
difficulty which has arisen between the two nations in Southeast 
Africa has not only created much excitement in both countries, 
but seems to be watched with great interest by all the Powers. 
The contention which has for sometime been going on between 
England and Portugal as to their respective rights or " spheres " of 
influence in the vast territories lying to the east and northeast of 
Mozambique has given rise to the trouble. The divergences of 
opinion, in face of the extravagant claims of Portugal, seem to 
have been regarded by ttie English Government with a sense of 
calmness, most probably born of the conviction that the little 
State was only swaggering, in the hope of gaining something from 
the English Government by swelling its pretensions to the utmost, 
but it does not appear to have been conceived that any serious 
effort would be made to enforce these pretensions. The news, 
however, that arrived in London about the middle of December, 
from Zanzibar, at once appears to have arrested public attention 
and given a painfully serious character to the dispatch. It looks 
as though Portugal must be evidently getting, from some as yet 
undivulged source, moral support for the claims she is setting up 
to huge slices of Africa. 

In reference to this dispute the correspondent of the Times 
writes: The cloud v/hich has arisen between Portugal and Eng- 
land gives no anxiety to European statesmen. Portugal, even 
before the late King's death, was — and, especially since his de- 
cease, is — a prey to agitators threatening a definitive explosion. 
The scandalous revelations respecting the new harbor at Lisbon 
have given a point to the animosity of men's minds, and have 
furnished a tangible reason for menacing enterprises long in con- 
templation. King Carlos is not hated nor unpopular. Worse 
than this, he may be said not to exist; » he simply floats," to use 
the expression of a trustworthy informant. When the time 
comes it will not be necessary to overturn him; a mere breath 
will blow him beyond the frontier. In such circumstances a con- 
flict like that now going on cannot be indefinitely postponed, and 
it is intelligible why the Spanish Government should seek to 
hasten the cataclysm by provoking an English demonstration 
against Portugal. In England it would appear to be universally 
agreed that the Portuguese must evacuate or be driven out of 
Nyassaland. The cable reports that Portugal has backed down 
on the filibustering business of Major Serpa Pinto, and intends to 
disavow his conduct in Africa, thus satisfying England regarding 
the hauling down of her Hag. 

Bushiri has not been so lucky as Arabi Pasha and other leaders 
of " peoples struggling to be free." He has fallen into the hands 
of Captain Wissman, and the Germans in dealing with ruffians of 
Bushiri's stamp, particularly when these affect a political role, 
have the common sense to treat them as vermin. Bushiri ac- 
cordingly got a short shrift and dangled at the end of a rope. 
Had he been captured by the English, the Government would 
probably have placed him in comfort, and given him a pension, 
as in the case of Theebaiv. Some English journals have hinted 
that the Germans would have found it politic to treat their 
atrocious captive with more consideration; but others consider 
this would have been sickly sentimentality. Unless it was that 
of Theebaw, it is said there never was a clearer case for sharp ex- 
ample than that of Bushiri. It is somewhat remarkable to find 
that up to the present no effort has been made by the British 
sentimentalists to get up an agitation for the reprieve of Tantia 
Bheel, the bold Robin Hood of the Central Provinces in India. 
They have apparently not yet found out how great a scoundrel 
he is. 

We alluded in last week's comments to the action of Russia in 
abolishing all the rights and privileges ceded to the inhabitants 
of the Baltic provinces; but it would appear from the numerous 
letters addressed to the Freisinnige Zeimng, that this is equaled by 
Prussian intolerance. It is asserted that not only the Jews are 
not promoted to the rank of officer in the Prussian army, but that 
for the last eight years it is difficult, or next to impossible, for 
them to obtain the rank of non-commissioned officer or Gefreiter. 
This is particularly so with the Slst regiment of infantry, now 
stationed at Frankfort and at Breslau for instance, the military 
commanders even exclude the Jews from all duties in hospital, 
commisary, or administrative service. An Alsace journal informs 
its readers that in consequence of a law, dated December 16, 1873, 
in reference to cemeteries, the Director of the district of Sarre- 
bourg has notified the Mayors of his district that in future all 
epitaphs are to be written in the German language. Article 6 of 
this law reads thus: " Headstones or monuments in future are to 
bear no inscriptions that have not first been submitted for the 
approval of the Mayor." Russia abolishes the German language 
in the Baltic provinces; Germany evidently intends to abolish 
the French in Alsace. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Utah Consolidated Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Utah Consoli- 
dated Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 
23, .Nevada Block, San Fraucisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the ' 9th day of January, 189°, at the hour cf 1 P. M.. 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Saturday, January 2&, 1890, at 12 
o'clock noon, 

A. H. FISH, Secretary. 
Office— Room 23, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

annuaT^eetingT" 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

The annual meeting' of the stockholders in the Sierra Nevada Silver 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the Company, room 15, Nevada 
Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 1 5th day of January, 1899, at the hour of 1 P. M., 
for the purpose of the election a Board of Trustees to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. E L. PARKEK, Secretary. 

Office— Room 15, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fraucisco, 
California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 
The regular annual meeting of stockholders of the Oceanic Steamship 
Company will be held at the office of the Company, 327 Market street, San 
Francisco, California, on 

Tuesday, the 21st day of January, 1890, at the hour of 11 o'clock A. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Wednesday, Januaryftth, at 3 o'clock 
p. M. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



Home Mutual Insurance Company. 
The next annual meeting of the stockholders of this Company will be 
held at its principal office, No. 21(3 Sausome street, San Fraucibco, Cal., at 1 
o'clock p. m., on 

Wo-, iy. Janu'ry 2 th, A. D. 1890, 
for the election of Directors, to serve until their successors shall be elected. 
The polls will be open from one tu 4 o'cUck. 

CHAS. R. STOKY, Secretary. 
San Francisco, January 2, 189\ 



AN1.UAL MEETING. 



Silver King Min.ng Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Silver Kiug Mining 
Company will be held at the office of the Company, No. 26 Nevada Block, 
San Francisco, California, on 

Tuesday, the fourteenth (14th) day of January. 1890, at the hour of 1 o'clock, 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
vear, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Friday, January loth, at 3 o'clock 
p. m. AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

StJckholders' Meeting cf the Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporatfon. 
The fifth aunual meeting of the stockholders of the Anglo Nevada As- 
surance Corporation will be held at the office of the Corporation, at No. 315 
Montgomery street, Sau Fraucisco, on MONDAY, January 20, 1890, at 3 
o'clock P. M. 

LOUIS SLOSS, President. 

annuaTmeetingT 

The State Investment and Insurance Company. 

The regular aunual meeting of the stockholders of the above-named 
Compauy, for the electiou of a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
vear will be held at the nilice of the Company, Nos. 21S and 220 Sansome 
street on TUESDAY, the 14th day of January. ISal), at 12 o'clock M. 
s ' e ' CHS. H. CUSHING, Secretary. 

San Fraucisco, December 24, 1889. 




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SAN FRANCISCO. SATUBDA V. JANUARY 18, 1890~ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



LSAOIKfl Articles: Pa 

mlccbaoges 
Paternalism. 

Water Rates.. 

Ulaa Kennedy's Trfnmph. 

The New Ohio Senator 

N.-w York's Fifteen Hundred .. 

Our Schoolhonses 

The Courier As He Is.. ... 

The Wool Tmxes ... 

Captain O'Shea 

The Approaching End of the 

BlylheCase . 

Society. 

What .'-an She Do? 

Pleasure's Wand 

Pleasure's Wand (continued). .. 

A Well-Deserved Appointment. . . 

Sparks 

The Railroads 

Sporting 

Exterior of a Hindoo Mosque 



Page 
The NVero as a Mentor. n 

Gotham Gossip 12 

The Ethics of Divorce 12 

The Rose Jar 13 

Fiuaucial Review 14 

Town Crier , . . 15 

Sunbeams . . ifi 

Scientific and Useful 17 

Real Property jg 

Bourse and Underwriter 19 



Wells and FarL'n Statement 
Wells and Fargo Statement 

"Biz" 

Vanities. . , , 

World. Flesh and Devil. 
The Pine Street Franchise 

London's Only Beauty .. 

A Soldiers' Train 25 

Obituary 26 

The Universal Malady 27 

Comments on Foreign Affairs. 28 



ECONOMIC CHANGES. 



WE live iu queer times. New and strange economic problems 
confront the masses on every hand, and are suggesting rem- 
edies that are for the most part arrant quackery. In Bellamy's 
" Looking Backward," there is a fine example of what we mean. 
Everybody is reading that book which nobody will be wiser for 
having read. The government ownership of everything which 
it suggests is sheer humbug. Thoughtful people will better em- 
ploy themselves in consulting a better authority. They will find 
him in the person of David A. Wells, whose latest book, entitled 
" Recent Economic Changes," is a work of surpassing interest. 
A more impressive massing of facts and deductions therefrom, 
bearing upon the industrial revolution that has distinguished the 
past sixteen years all over the world, has never been presented, 
and the book is bound to take rank as one of the most important 
contributions to economic knowledge produced in any time. It 
relates, among other things, to the world-wide fall in prices, de- 
pression in trade, displacement and destruction of capital, and 
social discontent, which have been particularly manifested since 
about the year 1873. These disturbances have affected all the 
civilized nations and called forth government investigations and 
private inquiries without number. But in nearly all cases there 
has been a tendency to magnify local influences and <o overlook 
the universatility of causes that are producing such general ef- 
fects. A review of the various findings of these national investi- 
gations and private inquiries, forms a chapter of great interest 
and value. There must, however, be a universal cause for so 
general an effect, and Mr. Wells has little difficulty in finding it in 
the unprecedented increase in productive and distributive power, 
through improved machinery and all varieties of labor-saving in- 
ventions by which labor has been displaced, great amounts of 
capital destroyed, old bases of effort overthrown, processes 
cheapened, and production of commodities multiplied far beyond 
the immediate limits of consumption. The little steam kettle of 
Watts is revolutionizing the world. The steam engine is the 
working force that is changing all industrial conditions. Man as 
a labor machine has almost been superceded and must accommo- 
date himself to a world in which main strength and stupidity are 
no longer of great value in bread winning. Can it be doubted 
that our race will in the end be better off for having the heaviest 
part of the curse upon man removed? The process of evolution 
which has set in will no doubt go on giving to man, as it has 
already done in a marked degree, greater control over the forces 
of nature, greater command of the means of subsistence and 
gratification of wants and greater comfort in exchange for less ef- 
fort than before. The course is upward and not downward, and 
it will so continue. Wages have advanced and the cost of living 
declined. Luxuries are to-day enjoyed by the masses that were 
a few years ago within the reach of only the favored few. With 
the greater demand for education and opportunities to acquire it, 
the many are being uplifted in the scale of intelligence, and it 
may be that there may come governmental changes in the near 
future that will take less thought of the classes and more of the 
masses, but we may be very sure that such changes will be intel- 
ligent ones, and therefore will not include socialism, or the mak- 
ing of the state the equalizer of natural inequalities, or the con- 
stituting all men prosperous by statute fiat, or act of Congress. 



PATERNALISM. 

IT has not escaped the lynx-eyed presa of the Bast that mosl of 
the legislation proposed in Congress since the beginning of the 
m bas been of a paternal character, and mainly l',.r the bene- 
fit of the new Md Western States, The Springfield Republican is 
very excellent authority for the statement that •• folly eighty per 
cent, of the measures introduced thus far are for special relief to 
private persons and corporations, and a large per cent, of the really 
constructive legislation contemplated in the remaining bills, reso- 
lutions, and constitutional amendments reveals a stronger federal- 
ist drift than at any other time in the history of the Republic." 
There cannot be a doubt about the fact that the first business of a 
Congressman or Senator is to obtain an appropriation for the bene- 
fit of his constituency, and to grind his own and his friend's axes. 
To accomplish those purposes he must enter into alliances, and 
help roll every other man's log. Legislation has become a game 
of grab, and he who can seize the most is deemed the greatest 
statesman and the truest patriot. All the early theories as to 
principles of Government are given to the winds. It is now emi- 
nently proper to put through any bill or money vote that will in- 
ure to the benefit of your locality, your friends or yourself. That 
is what men go to Congress for. " What is there in it for us? " is 
the great question ol the day in almost all walks of life, and is as 
applicable to the business of legislating as to any other. State in- 
dependence is being made to mean State dependence on the cen- 
tral power. No longer is it held to be true, in practice at least, 
that that government governs best which governs least. We seem 
all to have reconstructed our views in that regard. It is a singu- 
lar fact that not one of the so called reformers of the day is claim- 
ing attention for his advocacy of anything the individual can do 
for himself, or for what the city, or county, or State can do for it- 
self, but each one is busy in showing in his own way what the 
Government can do for us all. The nostrums of the day are all 
of one kind, and all favor governmental interference in every- 
thing. The latest and apparently the most popular craze is " Na- 
tionalism," which, as we understand it, is to prove a kind of 
Aaron's rod, and swallow up all other isms. Perhaps it will. It 
certainly seems to be the logical and natural outcome of the polit- 
ical campaign of 1888, and of the discussion that flooded the coun- 
try at that time. From that kind of jGovernment, which deems 
its first duty to be to nurse and coddle every man's business to 
that other kind, which is to run and operate the entire round of 
industries for the benefit of everybody, would appear to be only 
a natural and proper step in the great advance of human progress 
and prosperity. If it is proper and wise to have the one, it fol- 
lows, by a parity of reasoning, that it is eminently discreet and 
just to secure the other. Nationalism is the natural corollary of 
protection. The former is but the obvious enlargement of the lat- 
ter. Perhaps the better name for both is paternalism. 

And towards paternalism the nation is rapidly, if unconscious- 
ly, drifting. Not only is the tone of thought of the agitators of 
the period in that direction, but so also is the whole scope and 
tendency of congressional action. If there be a single measure 
commanding prominent support that does not partake of that 
character, we cannot at this moment recall what it is. It is 
really remarkable how far this kind of thing is being pushed. 
The habit of running to the Government, like children to a parent, 
for every want is growing apace. Every little puddle that begins 
nowhere and ends at the same place, has somebody to advocate 
its being dredged into a navigable stream. The National Banks 
not being satisfied with the free use of Government money, now 
want an extension of their already numerous privileges. The 
silver miners are noisily insisting that the Government shall 
make seventy-five cents in silver worth a dollar. Louisiana and 
Kansas want a bounty to enable them to grow sugar. Ship 
builders want a fraction of a cent for every ton of shipping they 
build and for every mile their vessels sail. Chicago, New York, 
Washington and St. Louis are fighting for ten millions for a Fair. 
Senator Mitchell wants money to develop silk culture. Blair to 
cure illiteracy, Manderson for sugar beet seed and for sugar man- 
ufacturing machinery, Plumb for irrigation in Arizona, Reagan 
for water ditches in Texas. Cullom for a like service in California, 
and Moody for the same thing in South Dakota. There is now 
a bill on its way through the Senate for the organization of a 
"bureau of information, relating to employment, occupation, 
wants, means of livelihood and homes." Senator Blair offers a 
constitutional amendment, providing for permanent aid to estab- 
lishments of religion. Morrill wants the postal franchise free to 
historical societies. Manderson desires a national patho-biological 
laboratory established. There are other bills looking to the crea- 
tion of a bureau of fine arts, the advancement of anatomical 
science and the endowment of State colleges. Edmunds wants a 
national university and a national mausoleum at Washington. 
Thus there are already propositions to nationalize religion, law, 
education, agriculture, fine arts and science, and we know not 
how many more things. All this is a very wide drifting from 
the teachings of the early fathers. Extreme paternalism is a 
curious product of kingly rule to be taking such deep root in our 
American system. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 18, 1890. 



WATER RATES. 

A CONTEMPORARY, that is not as deep as the ocean nor as 
wise as an owl, but often poses as if it believed itself both 
wise and deep, is just now engaged in palming off on the public a 
number of technical phrases which it endeavors to make serve 
the purpose of arguments on the water question. It, for instance, 
says the waterworks are " a public use," in the legal sense of that 
term, and proceeds to argue that in consequence they are not en- 
titled to be paid for upon any conditions known to justice or 
equity. The service which Spring Valley supplies is of course a 
public use, and that is how it comes that the legislative authority 
claims the right to fix its charges against its will. If it were not 
a public use, there would be no more right of interference with 
the selling price of water than exists in the case of beef or bread. 
But it is an entirely new purpose to which to turn the phrase to 
use it as a reason for not doing equity. In all justice, it should 
cut the other way. The commonwealth is interested in having all 
its public uses supplied. Street railroads, gas, water, telegraphs, 
hackney carriages and other more or less imperative necessities, 
come within the category. That city would indeed be badly off 
that could not induce people to associate their capital together to 
supply these wants. It follows, from motives of sound public 
policy, that it is as wise and prudent as it is only decently honest 
to pay every purveyor of an article essential to the comfort and 
well-being of the community a just and reasonable compensation 
for his services. That is the way, and the only way, to make it 
certain that a city will not lack those great enterprises which con- 
stitute public uses. Moreover, the interests of common morality 
require that the public shall not do that in cheir corporate capacity 
which would be disgraceful to them individually. That is to say, 
they have no right to set the bad example of taking an article by 
force at less than what it is justly worth. That is robbery. These 
are such obvious truths that the people who are arguing that a 
thing should not be honestly paid for because it is " a public use " 
ought to apologize for having rendered the employment of such 
elementary lessons necessary. 

Then John Stuart Mills' technical phrase "unearned incre- 
ment," is being trotted out and made to do service after a fashion. 
It is held up to be terribly wicked to ask interest on something 
which in the philosophic sense can be said to be unearned. If it 
be, then what a shockingly wicked and perverse generation we 
must be, to be sure! Every person who invests in a piece of real 
estate, or in a business, expects it to appreciate in the market. 
The extent to which it does is unearned increment, to which in 
the present state of society he is as much entitled as to anything 
else that is his. Increase of population has given to the Bulletin 
and Vail an added marketable value far beyond the capital 
actually put into them. If Messrs. Pickering and Pitch were 
treated to the dose of medicine they are ladling out to the eleven 
hundred of their fellow citizens who happen unfortunately to 
have invested in Spring Valley stock, the Simonton heirs would 
be worse off than they are, the unearned capital of a lifetime 
would be swept away, and advertising would be dirt cheap, be- 
cause of its being estopped from earning interest on more than 
the capital originally invested. If that were to be the rule, no- 
body would invest in anything. All investments involve more 
or less of risk. If the losses must be endured by and the profits 
denied to him who puts his money into anything, who would be 
fool enough to do it? If the stockholders had placed their cap- 
ital in any other kind of estate on this peninsular than water 
works, who will say that at this time of day they would not be 
entitled to some part of the unearned increment resulting from 
increased population? The question for the public is as to what 
Spring Valley should be allowed to earn. The ordinary method 
of determining the value of an enterprise is by capitalizing the 
interest it will yield. That rule cannot be applied to this case, 
because the will of the Supervisors determines the earning capac- 
ity. The only method that seems to^rernain is to ascertain what 
the works could be replaced for, and allow fair interest to be 
earned on that sum. That is the stockholders' suggestion, and 
appears quite equitable. 

MISS KENNEDY'S TRIUMPH. 



THE decision of the Supreme Court in Miss Kennedy's case 
will do more for the public schools of this city than anything 
that has happened for a long time. The lady has won at all 
points. She has not only been given back pay amounting to 
nearly $6,000, but has been practically reinstated in her old posi- 
tion, for the Court holds that the Board had no power to dismiss 
her from it. She must either be placed back where she was, be 
given an equally good position, or be paid full salary nntil she is. 
That is where the public good of the Court's decision comes in. 
It prevents efficient teachers being removed except for cause. 
It secures several hundred men and women in places for which 
nearly all of them are qualified, but which were coveted by and 
were to be given to favorites of doubtful competency. It. to a 
very appreciable extent and in an agreeable way, redeems the 
school department from the machinations of the Boss. If it had 
been rendered earlier John Svvett had been spared the humiliation 
that ended a brilliant official career. The department is to be no 
less congratulated than Miss Kennedy. 



THE NEW OHIO SENATOR. 

THE Democrats of Ohio have elected Mr. Calvin S. Brice, of 
New York, to succeed Mr. Payne, of the Standard Oil Trust, 
in the Senate. They have been criticised for this action on the 
ground that Brice is simply a millionaire and nothing more. Per- 
sons who indulge in sneers of this kind overlook the peculiar 
conditions of Ohio politics. We must not judge a Buckeye Legis- 
lature by the exacting standard that would be applied to one in 
California or Nevada. It may be easier for a Campbell to pass 
through the eye of a needle than for a millionaire to enter the 
United States Senate by way of the Pacific Coast, but there is no 
such austerity of virtue everywhere. Ohio politics particularly 
are of the earth, earthy. There is no more groveling soul than 
an Ohio Democrat, except an Ohio Republican. When we reflect 
that if the Democrats had not had the votes to elect Brice, the 
Republicans would have elected " Charley" Poster, we can hardly 
help feeling that the new Senator was a very respectable choice. 
Certainly he will be a vast improvement on his predecessor. Mr. 
Brice is a millionaire, it is true, but he is something more. He 
has ideas. His claim to preferment is not merely that he con- 
tributed money to the last campaign fund, but that he gave time 
and thought to the spending of it. Many laughed at bis " rain- 
bow chasing " and "educational campaigns," but it looks as if 
his rainbows were being located. He was not at once successful, 
to be sure, and in the eyes of politicians, to whom there is nothing 
beyond the immediate office, that was enough to condemn him. 
But the educational campaign had its effect, and that effect is 
steadily broadening. It is quite likely that if Brice had been a 
vacuous political fossil like Payne, his millions would have 
elected him just the same, but fortunately for the reputation of 
the Ohio Democracy, the millions have a human attachment. 



THE PRESENT STATUS OF THE SHARON CASE. 

IT may not be technically true to say of the long-pending Sharon 
case that it is dead, but there is practically no life left in it. It 
will once again be heard of some two years hence, when the 
United States Supreme Court at Washington will confirm the de- 
cision of Mr. Justice Field, and that will be the final and irrevo- 
cable end of perhaps the most celebrated case that ever excited 
the public mind or engaged the attention of a court of justice. 
It will thereafter sleep that peaceful sleep which knows no awak- 
ening — as, indeed, do several of the most conspicuous participants 
in it. It has been a long-drawn-out, costly and exasperating con- 
test, for which life is all too short. Judge Shafter is to be con- 
gratulated upon the easy and graceful, as well as eminently 
proper, way in which he got rid of the worry, toil and trouble of 
what could in any event have amounted to only an abortive trial, 
and therefore to a waste of public time, money and patience. It 
is a pity that his conservative course could not have been availed 
of as an example in an earlier period of the case. He was not ready 
to rush in and assume jurisdiction when that grave question was 
seriously in doubt. It was enough for him, as a sworn judicial 
officer, that another tribunal, exercising at least coordinate pow- 
ers, had acquired a control of the case, which he could not hope 
to successfully dispute without bringing on the dire calamity of 
a conflict between the courts. He therefore prudently ordered all 
proceedings stayed in his court until the final decree of the United 
States Supreme Court is received. That pleases everybody, even 
the attorneys, for there are now no fighting lawyers left in the 
case. It may be safely assumed that the Sharon case is ended. 

NEW YORK'S FIFTEEN HUNDRED. 

MR. WARD MCALLISTER adds another to the list of great 
men who have kicked down the ladders by which they 
rose to fame. Since the success of his New Year's ball he has con- 
temptuously repudiated the great principle that first made his 
name a household word. " Another thing our ball accomplished," 
said Mr. McAllister to a New York reporter recently, "was to 
enlarge the circle of society, to do away with that nonsensical 
Four Hundred idea." •' Nonsensical! " This of an idea that orig- 
inated in Mr. McAllister's own teeming brain and carried its 
author at once from obscurity into fame! Until Mr. McAllister 
enunciated the historical aphorism that society in New York con- 
tained only four hundred people, the masses of the human race 
remained in primitive darkness concerning his identity. The 
name of McAllister was no more to them than that of Smith or 
Jones. Now it would open the doors of any ball room in the 
world from St. Petersburg to Saucelito. And all the credit for the 
change is due to " that nonsensical Four Hundred idea." 

Mr. McAllister has established a new standard now. He thinks 
there are as many as fifteen hundred people in New York society. 
"Our invitations," he says "went to fifteen hundred people. 
With that invitation list we believe no family which should ex- 
pect to be invited was slighted." It appears, therefore, that 
about one person in a thousand in the metropolis is in society. 
The other nine hundred and ninety-nine have to hustle to. raise 
money enough to keep the one going. But was not Mr. McAllis- 
ter taking rather serious chances in gathering the whole of New 
York society in one ballroom? What if the roof had fallen in? 
Where would New York have been next day with no society left? 



Jan. IH, : 



A\ FRANCISCO NEW! 



LETTER. 



CAPTAIN O'SHEA. 

WM<» i« tin* frii who ha* had the audacity to bring 

a salt fordlvorce from nts wife, and to couple with it thohon 
oird naniv of ihc saintly ParnellT The friendship between the 
- ami I'arnrll is ol long standing, and when the Irish leader 
.ired from public view, aa he 10 often and so myaterionsly 
did. he would choose their beantifal residence ;ii Bltham for his 
retreat. How in* would seclude himself there, battling the at- 
tempts "f bta ommunlcate with him on even the 
most urgent public business, is a matter of well-known history. 
Obviously, bis home most hive been congenial to him. To have 
foond such a retreat from the slnrms ami passions of Irish agita- 
tion moat have Indeed been a comfort Mrs. O'Shea is a beauti- 
ful and accomplished woman, who comes of a distinguished fam- 
ily, and is possessed Ol a fortune in her own right. The Captain 
Is somewhat of a diplomat, and in that capacity was constantly 
made use of by Parnell. All s^rts of difficult missions were found 
for him, and it does not appear that he ever failed for lack of either 
g.wnl will or ability. He it was who negotiated the famous »« Kil- 
mamham Treaty.'' by which Gladstone was induced to release Tar- 
nell and some dozen other members of Parliament from jail. 
O'Shea never associated on terms of intimacy with the Irish nation- 
alists, and they disliked him in consequence. They were, further- 
more, jealous of the frequency with which he, and not they, was 
selected as the mouthpiece of their leader. They accordingly en- 
deavored to make trouble, an opportunity for which arose when 
Parnell thought it would be convenient to have his friend in Par- 
liament, and desired to elect him for Clare. Another candidate 
was started by the Home Rule parcy, and Parnell was under the 
necessity of personally visiting the constituency and begging that 
O'Shea might be elected, much to the disgust of Dillon, O'Brien 
and others. Of course, Parnell prevailed, but not without leaving 
much bitterness behind. It was said by his political associates at 
the time that he " had thrust his man Friday down the elector's 
throats." The irritation was by no means lessened by the fre- 
quency with which Parnell continued to intrust him with confi- 
dences that he did not seem to be willing to share with even the 
most distinguished of his associates. Open rebellion against this 
state of things was threatened at the last general election, and 
O'Shea retired in order to " relieve his friend of embarrassment, "but 
their association otherwise continued. About two years ago 
rumors became current in London society that trouble was brew- 
ing in the O'Shea family, and members of the Irish party were un- 
doubtedly the authors of them. It is now said that O'Shea wants 
to placate the powers that be, and please the Times. It seems a 
very inadequate motive for the besmirching of a wife, the aban- 
donment of a fortune, and the loss of social status. 

THE APPROACHING END OF THE BLYTHE CASE. 

IT is really wonderful how the public interest in the Blythecase 
survives. There never has been a trial, save that of the cele- 
brated Sharon case, which so enlisted public attention. Of course, 
one interesting feature common to both of them has been the 
large amount of money involved. It has been said that our local 
judiciary is not strong enough to eliminate truth from falsehood, 
and see that justice is done when the testimony is conflicting and 
the money stake is large. Whatever color of truth the past may 
have given to that allegation, it is safe to predict that it will be 
falsified in the present instance. The Judge who has the de- 
termination of the Blythe case is only a little man, but he is a 
mighty strong one. He is hearing the testimony with infinite 
patience, and when the time comes to make up a judgment, all 
that a keen-sighted, capable and conscientious Judge can do to 
make it a righteous one, will assuredly be done. Happily, on 
that point there are no two opinions. It was a lucky accident, or 
incident rather, which preserved Judge Coffey to the Judicial 
Bench to try so important a case. It was not intended that it 
should fall to his lot. But even Bosses sometimes propose better 
than they can dispose. Bush street long hungered for the plums 
in the Blythe estate. It wanted honest old Phil Roach superceded 
by somebody who understood addition, division and silence. 
Judge Coffey alone stood in the way of the accomplishment of 
that end. It was intended to get rid of him by refusing him a 
renomination in 1888. Up to almost the last moment his name 
was carefully excluded from the slate. Public opinion, however, 
was as strongly expressed in favor of the retention of the honest 
Judge as public opinion in this city is ever expressed in favor of 
anything, which is not saying much for it. To the everlasting 
credit of the young delegates in the convention, it was found that 
they could not be relied upon to " down Coffey," and to them the 
Blythe contestants owe their good fortune of having so unexcep- 
tional a Judge to try their case. The case of the deceased's 
widow has now been entered upon, and as she is the last of the 
claimants to be heard the beginning of the end appears to be in 
sight. Great mystification seems to exist as to the degree of proof 
necessary to constitute such a legal marriage as entitles the sur- 
viving wife to inherit. The later and better decision in the Sharon 
case was that if there was a mutual and open assumption of the 
duties and obligations of married life, that was sufficient. That 
is what Mr. Highton is just now overwhelmingly proving in the 
Blythe case. 



THE COURIER AS HE IS. 



THE continental courier bus been sketched in a good many 
books of travel and in several American novels. He has gen- 
erally been drawn as a Lrreat improvement on the American h;uk- 
liian or hotel-runner in point of culture and manners, but of about 
the same moral obliquity and readiness t<- take advantage of the 
unsophisticated. A very line specimen of the Italian courier is 
revealed in the application made by one Luigi Picciarelli to the 
Probate Court in this city for the production of the will of the 
late Miss Van Alen, who was one of the victims of the Ischia 
earthquake. The courier claims that for his valuable services 
Miss Van Alen had named him in her will for $60 a month, and 
he insinuates that her father, W. K. Van Alen, of this city, is 
withholding this will from probate. Every old San Franciscan 
knows Mr. Van Alen, and knows that his reputation for strict 
integrity has never been questioned for forty years. The real 
facts of this peculiar case are that the daughter, in recognition of 
the faithful services of the courier, did make a memorandum 
about a year before her death, giving Picciarelli $40 a month out 
of her personal estate. There is no question that this request 
would have been complied with, although the paper was not 
found, had not the Italian's cupidity prompted him to demand 
$20 a month additional, and to file what purported to be the lady's 
memorandum with the American Consul at Naples. This mem- 
orandum is in a species of Italianized English which would de- 
light Mark Twain, and is plainly a forgery. The father paid the 
courier $1,000, which, under the circumstances, was much more 
than he deserved, and now the fellow comes back to demand the 
original annuity. The case is noteworthy, as it furnishes a good 
warning to Californians who go abroad not to put any faith in 
the foreign courier. His words may be sweeter than honey, but 
he is generally as mercenary as he is unscrupulous. His polite- 
ness and his courtesy are purely matters of business, and it is not 
safe to trust him with any commission which demands strict in- 
tegrity or unselfish devotion to the interests of a patron. 

OUR SCHOOLHOUSES. 

THE Girls' High School has had the good fortune to burn down. 
Peace to its ashes. Nothing is perfect in this world — there is 
a thorn to every rose, a cloud to every silver lining. The Boys' 
High School did not go, too. But there is no need for despond- 
ency; it will,go, sooner or later. It used to be said that in every 
American town the best building was the schoolhouse. If that 
rule still holds, San Francisco is not an American town. We have 
none too many good buildings of any kind, but even according to 
the bay window, stuccoed front San Francisco standard of archi- 
tecture, our public schools are poor relations. They were designed 
to harmonize with the prevailing vistas on Tehama and Natoma 
streets, and they are not at home anywhere else. We are proud 
of our liberal spirit in refusing to handle copper coins, and we 
like to picture to ourselves the thrifty Bostonian reining in his 
nickel with a string, but we do not so often consider the fact that 
that same Bostonian spends dollars in beautifying his city, where 
we are satisfied to admire ourselves for our lordly magnificence in 
paying fifteen cents for a ten-cent drink. We are still banking on 
the liberality of Ralston, and Ralston has been dead for fifteen 
years. In architecture of all kinds we have stood still till within 
the last three years, and in the matter of school architecture we 
have been stationary down to the present moment. Itistobe 
hoped that in rebuilding the Girls' High School we shall have a 
change. With one good building as a model, we should be toler- 
ably safe against any tendency to perpetuate the present system 
of educational barracks. 

THE WOOL TAXES. 



ABOUT 800 manufacturers and growers of wool— principally the 
former— have petitioned Congress for the removal or reduc- 
tion of the wool duties. They say that if the present taxes are 
continued the manufacture of woolens in this country will be 
crushed. These petitioners represent probably 100,000 operatives, 
upon whom the wool duties operate now in the direct reduction 
of wages, and threaten total loss of employment in the near fu- 
ture. It is stated that the answer of the Committee on Ways and 
Means to their appeal will be an increase in the taxes. One of 
the witnesses upon whose testimony this action is to be taken 
was a gentleman from Texas, who said that he could raise coarse 
carpet wool, such as is now imported from half-civilized countries, 
if Congress would give bim enough protection to make the price 
as high as that of fine wool. In other words, he would have the 
government deliberately destroy the American carpet-making in- 
dustry for the sake of undoing what has been accomplished in 
the way of improving our breeds of sheep, so that onr growers 
may be induced, at great expense, to go back to the production 
of the cheap, coarse fleeces which barbarous tribes produce be- 
cause they do not know how to raise anything better. This 
patriot said that he hired Mexican sheepherders at $15 a month, 
because Americans were not reliable. His ideas seem to have 
produced a deep effect on the committee. The Democrats do not 
deserve such luck as the passage of a bill of this description by a 
Republican Congress would be. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 18, 1890 



FROST and rain have alternated with great regularity this week, 
the weather god giving us a taste of each, turn about, though 
it must be confessed the rain on Wednesday night was more than 
a taste— it came down in a deluge. This long continued uncer- 
: tainty as to what his disposition toward us will be twelve hours 
ahead is having a very decided effect upon gaieties. 
Some that were on the cards for this month have been 
i postponed, others abandoned altogether, while those which 
I are taking place have a half-hearted sort of air about them which 
is quite depressing. To be sure, the absence of some of our so- 
ciety lights from late festivities can be accounted for on the score 
of the colds which are now so prevalent, and to have a touch of 
fa grippe is quite the fashionable fad of the moment. 

One of the events of last week which I omitted to mention in 

i my last letter was the marriage of Miss Clara Luning to Mr. John 

, M. Cunningham, which was solemnized in the bride's apartments 

! at the Palace Hotel on Wednesday evening by Father Renaudier, 

of the French Church on Bush street. The rooms were nicely 

decorated and well filled with guests; Brandt's orchestra was in 

attendance, and the supper was a handsome one. There were no 

bridesmaids, unless little Florence Whittell can be called one, and 

' who with her brother, Master George Whittell, carried baskets of 

I flowers in advance of the bridal party as it entered the room. 

The honeymoon is being spent at Coronado Beach and after the 

return to town of the happy pair, the bride will receive her 

friends at her own home on Broderick street. 

The fourth German of the Batchelor's Cotillion Club, was 
danced at B'nai B'rith Hall on Friday night, with Mr. George 
Vernon Gray as leader who had Miss Cora Thomas as his partner. 
The hall looked very much as usual in the way of decorations, 
but the elder members of the club did not muster in force. In 
fact, there were a number very conspicuous by their absence. 
However, all the younger members were there and even if the 
night was cold the party was a delightful one to them and the 
after supper dances hugely enjoyed. 

Mrs. Gus Bowie's postponed tea came off at her residence on 
Clay street on Saturday afternoon. Fortunately the day, though 
cold, was clear and pleasant, for with the dread of the influenza, 
which is coming this way, it is getting to be almost impossible to 
drag the more staid members of society out of doors in wet 
weather, prevention being better than cure, they think, and act 
accordingly. 

The society event of the present week was the first night of 
the Juch Opera Company, in Faust, at the Baldwin, and it is some 
time since I have seen a more brilliant audience, from a society 
standpoint, than the one which assembled there that night. 
Musical sounds have been filling the air for some time past, and 
with the concerts which are on the tapis, and the approaching 
Patti season to follow, we shall no doubt have our fill of melody 
before the season ends. 

There are some who, no doubt, will remember the time, a few 
years ago, when every one who wished to be thought any one, 
was going to the Mardi Gras Festival at New Orleans. Whether 
it fell short of expectations or not, none who went would say, but 
never since then has there been such an exodus in that direction. 
It is just possible that our own ability to give well-conducted 
Mardi Gras masquerade balls may have something to do with 
keeping people here. At any rate the Mardi Gras balls given by 
the Art Association the past two years were so successful, they 
have decided that we shall have another one this year, and learn- 
ing by their past experience, the managers are determined that 
any shortcomings — that is, if there were any — observable then, 
shall be remedied this time, and the evening be one of pure and 
unalloyed delight to all. Arrangements^are already well underway, 
the different committees hard at work, the floor managers selected 
(and a better selection could not easily be made), and Odd Fel- 
lows' Hall chosen as the scene of revelry. It now remains for 
the ladies to lend their aid in beauty of costume to put the finish- 
ing touch to what is hoped will prove a grand success, in which 
event I think it may safely be said that the Mardi Gras mask 
ball has come to stay. 

News has been received of the marriage of Mr. George Berton 
to Mademoiselle Tricot, which took place last month at Brest, 
France, where the groom's mother Madame Berton has made her 
home. 

Of the weddings on the tapis, the day named for that of Miss 
Sallie Stetson to Mr. Chauncey Winslow, is the 17th of February, 
the ceremony to take place at the Stetson residence on Van Ness 
avenue. The marriage of Miss Christine Barreda to Mr. Charles 
Moore, whose engagement has just been announced, will not take 
place, I understand, till after Easter, Several of our newly made 
matrons have returned from their honeymoon trip, settled down 
in their cosy homes, and announced reception days when they 
will be at home to receive their friends and their congratulations 
au mime temps. Mrs. H. A. Williams nie Caduc, will be at home 
on Wednesdays, at 2218 Devisadero street. Mrs. Fred Peterson 



nee Somers, will receive on Thursdays in January at 1034 Mission 
sireet, and Mrs. R. L. Sherwood's nee Blethin cards name Fridays 
in January, and her residence 2297 Sacramento street. 

The latest bride, Mrs. Fred. Johnson nee Gibbs, will also be at 
home on Fridays as soon as the bridal trip is ended and her locale 
will be 1503 Jackson street. 

Death has been unusually busy in society circles this past 
week and among those whose loss will recall memories of early 
days in San Francisco are Mrs. General Hutchinson, Mrs. F. J. 
Thibault, and Mrs. Major Daniels, all of whom were, I am told, 
well-known members of society away back in the fifties. In ad- 
dition to these may be mentioned the death of Mrs. Dimond who 
belonged to a later period in our social world, and whose daughters 
are popular members of our young society. 

A praise service was given at St. John's Presbyterian Church 
last Sunday evening, when the music sung at the Christmas ser- 
vice was repeated with equal brilliancy. Miss Carrie Milzner, 
Miss May Thome, Mr. S. Blum and Mr. W. S. Blake composed the 
choir. 

What with news of snow blockades and railroad mishaps, we 
have been kept upon the anxious seat of late in regard to our 
letters from the East. I hear that one of the sufferers by the 
burning of the government mail and baggage cars at Sidney, 
Nebraska, was Mrs. Field's sister, Mrs. Whitney, whose exten- 
sive collection of bric-a-brac and curios, made during her recent 
visit to Europe, was entirely destroyed. 

Mr. and Mrs. Decker, Mrs. Cheeseman and Miss Jennie Cheese- 
man returned last week from their visit to Coronado, and are at 
present occupying their old quarters at the Palace Hotel. 

Mrs. and Miss Eyre were expected home this week from their 
visit to New York, and Mrs. McCoppin, who is now at the Occi- 
dental, will probably remain in San Francisco for several months 
longer, owing to the destruction by fire of her lovely home in San 
Luis Obispo, but which Mr. McCoppin intends rebuilding at once. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard Chase are looked for early in February, 
on their return from Guatamala, where they have been visiting 
the Mizners. Mrs. Pacheco, who is stopping with her daughter, 
Mrs. Will Tevis, will remain in San Francisco for some time. She 
had a charming visit among old friends at the East, but prefers 
the Pacific Coast as a home. The loss of one is the gain of an- 
other. Lieutenant Noble has departed for a tour of the Eastern 
cities, Washington, New York, etc., which he will undertake dur- 
ing his leave of absence. But Lieutenant Sam Sturgis has re- 
turned to us again, after his leave of absence of two months, 
during which he was much missed by the young society of San 
Francisco. Mr. John Mackay is looked for towards the end of 
this month. 

Mrs. Hearst, having escaped from the snow blockade which 
caught her on her way East, is enjoying the festivities in Wash- 
ington. Her new house there ie almost ready for occupancy, and 
when she takes possession of it she announces that she will en- 
tertain extensively during the remainder of the season at the 
National Capital. General and Miss Miles are also now in Wash- 
ington, where Miss Miles will remain for a lengthened visit. Miss 
Maud O'Connor accompanied them East. Col. Fred Crocker left 
for New York on Tuesday last, and Judge Deady sailed for Hon- 
olulu on the Alameda, for the benefit of his health. 

Miss Ermentine Poole, who has been on a visit to the East for 
the past six months, is exptcted to arrive home next Wednesday. 

Miss Marie Melville, the daughter of Mrs. Eugenie Melville, 
left for Honolulu daring the week. She will spend the next two 
months in the Sandwich Islands and will visit all points of inter- 
est. Good wishes follow her for a speedy renewal of health. 

Society people will remember Mrs. Bergman and her daughter, 
who were here on a visit a few years ago from Cheyenne, and 
will be pleased to hear that on Jan. 23d Miss Ida Bergman will be 
married to Mr. Frank Alexander Kemp. As the parties are well- 
known society people the wedding will undoubtedly be a brilliant 
affair. Felix. 



The Maison Riche, at the corner of Geary street and Grant avenue, 
is the best place to dine. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W. B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR 
PACIFIC COAST, 

123 California St. S.F. 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOR SALE BY ALL FIRST-CLASS 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



Jan 



S \\ FR VNCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



WHAT CAN SHE DO? 
[Bf Hi Vmwow.] 



'* \/OU made a telling statement In lost week's News Lsi 

I the liirtirnhif- that besel :i woman when she is thrown np- 
•»n nei no of my numerous critics. » Now, 

cnn'c you mention a few occupations thai are open to her. posi- 
tions that would not require previous training, work that would 
bring immediate remuneration? " "There are none," I replied, 
•■ unless the Is -till young enough to be in sympathy with popu- 
lar modes of education. Then -he may succeed in earning a pit- 
tance in a primary school. Otherwise, when the woman is a lady 
whose social position makes it impossible for her to stoop to any 
menial office, she will have a hard time. She probably has too 
much pride to take a position in somebody's kitchen; for the 
same reason she does not wish to be a nurse-girl, or to work in a 
shop. What is she to do? The Women's Exchanges through- 
out the country are doing a great work in bringing the needy 
gentlewomen and their work indirect communication with those 
who would be glad to aid the deserving, but who can earn her 
living by chance sales of fancy work? Some few can make fancy 
cakes at a fair profit, but not every woman is a fair cook. Many 
women think that because they talk well, write an interesting 
letter, and are full of bright ideas, that they would make money 
in literature. In the first place, literature, as a means of sub- 
sistence is not to be depended upon, for fame must come before 
fortune does, and fame tarries long by the way. I saw in The 
Writer, that bright magazine published exclusively for the literary 
and journalistic fraternity, that Octave Thanet, whose " Knitters 
in the Sun " has attracted so much favorable notice of late, wrote 
for twenty years without special recognition. Twenty years — 
think of it! Journalism is another field, and a woman might earn 
her living in it, but it is a precarious subsistence at best, depend- 
ing a good deal upon the inventive or imaginative resources of the 
writer, and still more upon the caprices of the editor. It is not 
every woman who could be a Nelly Bly, and not every one who 
would be if she could. 

During the last few years the papers have bad much to say of 
vocations, called into existence by the rush of the age, which can 
be filled only by ladies; but while the theory is good, I fancy it 
might be a little difficult to put some of them into practice. There 
is the chaperon for theatres and out-door amusement, and from 
this occupation has grown a similar one — that of railroad chaper- 
on, a lady, elderly, of course, and a matron, possibly a widow, 
who for a consideration would travel with parties of young girls, 
generally off on a vacation tour. Indeed, one of the Eastern 
railroads has a respectable, entertaining and capable woman in 
their employ, who goes about on the line with parties, and her 
services are included in the price of the tickets. 

In New York ladies of taste are » dusting visitors." Their 
work is within the houses of the wealthy and indolent, or of 
those not indolent, but whose duties so absorb their time that 
they have not a moment even to oversee household affairs. It is 
the dusting visitor who arranges the reception rooms for sweep- 
ing, carefully removing all the bric-a-brac and articles of vertu to 
a safe position out of the reach of a heavy-handed housemaid. 
After the room has been swept they are replaced or rearranged. 
Of course only a person of good taste and extreme delicacy of 
touch could be successful in such a career. It is claimed that 
other women make a decent livelihood as " visiting menders," 
darning torn frocks and gauzy stockings so deftly that the rent 
could never be detected. Through their assistance the mending 
basket is kept empty and not allowed to assume the alarming 
proportions that it reaches in some households where the num- 
ber of little children means an endless reiteration of tiny garments. 

Then there is the manager of weddings, who advises the bride- 
elect as to her trousseau, purchases the entire outfit; in brief, 
makes all the arrangements, so that the young lady will not be 
hurried and harassed to death with the multitudinous calls gen- 
erally made directly upon the principal in so interesting an affair. 
She it is who sends out the invitations, orders the supper, buys 
the bridesmaids' presents, flowers, carriages — everything. 

Then there is the social chaperon, who flourishes particularly 
well in Washington, where there are so many whose first season 
is fraught with the mortification of discovering that what was 
the style in Poker Flat is not exactly good form in the National 
Capital. To such she gives points on all sorts of social etiquette, 
she decides vexed questions for them, she leads them through 
the intricate measures of social custom, she tells them what to do 
and when and how to do it. She is simply invaluable. To do 
this successfully she must be familiar with it all from her own 
knowledge. Very frequently she is a widow of some Govern- 
ment official, or an army or a naval officer, and so is perfectly at 
home. Sometimes she performs an extra duty of carrying around 
her employer's visiting cards, being sent out in the lady's coach. 
Since seldom anybody in Washington ever finds anybody else in, 
it is just as well. Both of these " chaperon " positions are some- 
what akin to that of lady's companion, which frequently is only 
another name for lady's maid. They, however, have the ad- 
vantage of being removed from the first suspicion of a menial 



office; then* is nothing of the hair-brushing, shoe-buttoning char- 
acter about them. 

1 also saw that an enterprising female, I think she ought to be 
called s female: in general I do not approve o! the word, but in 
this crtse I do, had hung out a sign of baby spanker, and offered 
|o go «>ul to administer corporal correction to infants whose 
parents were loath to do their duly, either from an excess of ten- 
der-heartedness or an inability to cope with the children. This 
person, who might be a modern Sally Brass, argued that punish- 
ment so administered would have a much greater effect than if 
given by a parent. She held that familiarity breeds contempt, 
and that it was much more effective for parents to employ a sort 
of moral "buggaboo," so terrifying to the childish mind. 

Terhapsthe field in which women has made the greatest success 
has been that of florists and decorators. Since long ago women 
have raised flowers for sale, but it has remained for the last de- 
cade to produce a dangerous competitor to those who have made 
the decoration of houses, churches and the festive board a profes- 
sion. I believe the first woman to do that sort of thing was in 
one of the Western States, and she made her tenstrike in some 
large affair of national importance. If I am not mistaken, she 
had charge of the memorial decorations at the time of Grant's 
funeral. This inspired a San Francisco girl to make the attempt 
and her success has become a matter of social history. As any 
one of sense could recognise, as soon as the superior character of 
a woman's handiwork in that sort of thing became known, it in- 
creased the demand for a woman's touch and a woman's ideas. 

Two Oakland girls, the Misses Breck, have been encouraged to 
undertake to follow the example of the pioneer in the field of 
woman decorators. They are well known in society; once 
wealthy, they have bravely faced the necessity of striking out for 
themselves, and they are going to succeed. They are tall, pretty 
and extremely ladylike, gentle in speech, unobtrusive in manner, 
and not given to a gossipy recital of what this patron said or what 
this one did. Neither do they feel called upon to keep up a run- 
ning fire of personal criticism for the amusement of their listeners. 
They are ladies. 

It is true that no one can render a woman so hearty and effect- 
ive a support as a woman ; and the society decorator, if she would 
be in the fashion, must secure at least one wealthy and influential 
patron. The late Mrs. Hickox, whose tragic death inflicted a loss 
upon the entire community, who recognized in her a noble woman 
and true friend, was one of the first to help tjiese girls to gain pa- 
tronage, and among their other friends are Mrs. G. W. Grayson, 
Mrs. J. C. Tucker and Mrs. A. P. Brayton. Success be to any 
woman who tries to help herself ; honor to those women who help 
her in her struggle ! 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 18, 1890. 




*' We Obey no Wand but Pleasure's."— Tom Moore. 

THERE are some grand operas which nearly every theatre-goer 
knows by heart, and Faust is one of them. It was a grand 
performance to those who had back, seats at the Baldwin last 
Monday night, but not to those in front, where the orchestra was 
huddled in with the spectators. Perhaps it was those down in 
front who started the applause in the wrong place, and if an au- 
dience wants to place itself in a bad light with a singer, just let it 
break out in applause, as was done Monday night, while the 
"Jewel" song was being sung. This was done more than 
once, and it was very evident that it was exceedingly annoying to 
Madame Jtich. It was the same with the other singers — Hed- 
mont, Tagliapietra and Vetta. Then, when the singers finished 
singing they were allowed to leave the stage without a sign of 
approbation from the audience. Surely it did not speak well for 
San Francisco, a city whose musical culture, it is claimed, ranks 
higher than that of any other city in America. Emma Juch's 
Marguerite is a dainty conception, probably the most tender and 
sympathetic Marguerite we shall see in a long time. Three years 
ago, when she sang in the same character with the National Op- 
era Company, her impersonation, outside of the vocalization, was 
considered somewhat crude, but since then it is apparent that 
she has spent many hours studying the character, the re- 
sult being that it is a better performance in every respect, meek 
and humble as Marguerite should be, with an idle fancy for her 
lover, which gradually grows stronger and stronger, until her love 
becomes a passion which overwhelms her. Madame Juch utilized 
with much taste her agreeable vocal resources, and her rendering 
of " Once there was a King in Thule " was warmly appreciated. 
Her voice is full, sweet and musical, suggesting in tone and style 
that of Albani. When she sings she surprises more than pleases; 
the range of her voice is extensive, and she manages it with artis- 
tic skill. Miss Lizzie Macnichol was a charming Siebel, and 
thoroughly caught the spirit of the character. She has a pleasant 
face, and a light, mezzo-soprano voice, which is always pleasant 
to listen to. She won the favor of the audience immediately, as 
was clearly noticeable. Franz Vetta has certainly developed into 
a fine basso since we last heard him, and his Mephistopheles is 
decidedly good. He might make his laugh more demon-like, 
and not continually play with his beard. Aside from this his 
rendering of the Devil was such one would naturally expect to 
see. But in the garden scene he reduced it to comedy, and sang his 
line "This good lady thinks she'll steal me," as he used to sing 
in former days, and consequently raised a laugh. The remainder 
of the singers are new here, but they enjoyed the rare advantage 
of making their San Francisco di?but under the most favorable 
circumstances, and on an occasion which many of our competent 
local vocalists would have gladly seized upon. Signor Tagliapie- 
tra was the Valentine of the cast, and although he died badly, the 
rest of his scenes were very effectively done. His baritone voice 
is of a rich quality, and he sings with little or no effort. His 
notes flow with the greatest ease ; they are all true, and if he had 
nothing else to do but sing, his work would be more agreeable. 
Charles Hedmont was a good-looking Faust, and nothing more. 
His tenor voice is musical enough, and in comic opera he could 
make a great success with it. He strained himself terribly to 
reach the high C, and he reached it, but was very faint afterwards. 
Those who have heard Faust sung by a notable tenor robusto, will 
note the vast difference. The orchestra, under the leadership of 
Herr Nuendorff, did admirable work, but the chorus was badly 
drilled and of poor quality, and had it not been for the leader, 
they would have failed several times. 
» * # 

Tuesday night was an " off " night at the Baldwin, and an "off" 
night in grand opera is usually very dismal. The audience on 
this occasion was very enthusiastic, however, and welcomed 
Miss Von Januschowsky as though it were her first appearance 
here. The opera was Adam's Postillion of Lonjameau, and was 
given for the first time in sixteen years. It contains nothing of 
great merit, and therefore it is seldom produced. The music is 
good; taking it from the standpoint of originality, but it does 
not give the singers much opportunity to show the power of 
their voices. Miss Von Januschowsky was quite at home as 
Madelaine and Mr. Hedmont did not win golden opinions for his 
singing or acting of Chapelon. Plainly, his voice or his style is 
not fitted for grand opera. 

# # * 

Juch is a charming Mignon. "Wednesday evening her com- 
pany gave a worthy performance of Thomas' well-known opera. 
Mme. Juch enters into the girlishness of the part with wonderful 
naturalness. She is pretty, as Mignon should be, but a trifle 
larger than Mignon is supposed to have been. That she sings the 
part with considerable freshness is also noticeable. She shows 
the different phases of the girl's life in a careful manner. Her 
sympathy, love and courage are all well drawn out. She sang 
the different arias with more expression than any Mignon we 



have seen, and her solo in Felina's chamber showed the wonder- 
ful flexibility and range of her voice. Vetta sang as Lothario, 
and did well. Georgine von Januschowsky was not quite strong 
enough for Felina, but when she sang " The Queen of the Fairies " 
solo, she greatly surprised the audience, who evidently thought 
her operatic limit did not extend beyond Paola. 

# # * 

It Trovatore was given Thursday night. Juch appeared as Car- 
men last night, and will sing " Agnes " in Friesckutz this evening; 
Maritana this afternoon. 

# # * 

At the Alcazar The Shadows of a Great City has been given in a 
worthy manner. Buckley never acts unless he has a good part, 
and he was very forcible as Tom Cooper. Stockwell's Jim Far- 
ren was an excellent bit of clever acting and Miss Brandon in the 
dual role of Anna and Helen Standish was sympathetic and in-' 
teresting. Julia Stuart, an emotional actress who is highly 
spoken of, appears next week. 

# # * 

If the book of Furiosa, the Daughter of Hades, the new opera 
at the Tivoli, is not a masterpiece of wit, inventiveness and con- 
struction, the music is extremely good, and can rank with that 
of any local composer of the lighter order. The first is by 
Fritz LaFontaine, and the latter by Theodore Vogt. The ideas of 
the former are clever enough, but they are injured by clumsiness 
in working out. The literary work of the libretto, with excep- 
tion of one song which we understand was not written by the 
author, is poor; the rhymes are bad and the dialogue consists of 
a lot of puns and jokes that show little or no originality. Mr. 
Vogt's music deserves praise. His score proves him to be a schol- 
arly musician. The different airs are all tuneful and original and 
the orchestration is grand. There is a Strauss movement — an 
excellent bit of composition, and several concerted pieces which 
show the composer's knowledge of the higher order of music. In 
the second act there is a pretty ballad, " Love is a flower," sung 
by Kate March i, and a well arranged quarrel-duet. The orches- 
tration of the duet is much too loud, and entirely drowned the 
air, which is exceedingly pretty. This is the only fault to be 
found with any of the music, which is worth hearing if the li- 
bretto is not. It is really too bad to have it wasted on such poor 
work. Mr. Norman, as the prince of Hades, the principal 
character, fills the role admirably. Max Figruan, as Sulphuric, 
was at a loss what to do in the first act, but his various character 
sketches in the last two Iwere very clever. Tellula Evans was a 
lively Furiosa and Mamie Taylor, a susceptible school marm. 
Messmer had a small part to fill, as Bruno Wheeler, but he sang 
very well some pretty ballads. The opera will be taken off after 
tomorrow night and Olivette will be sung Monday. 

# * * 

The Pearl of Pekin, at the California Theatre, would be very 
dull indeed were it not for Louis Harrison. Taking The Pearl of 
Pekin as a comic opera, it does not fill the bill. In the first place, 
it is, in many places, nothing more than a plagiarism of Tne Mi- 
kado. The character Tyfoo is nothing more than a double to Gil- 
bert's Mikado, and if Mr. Harrison spoke nothing but the author's 
lines, the effect would be more evident. The " four little Tsein- 
Tsein girls " are nothing more than the " three little maids " with 
one added; they sing an air almost the same as Sullivan's — in 
fact, it is the same air for several bars — and if this is or- 
iginality, then the American comic opera is a thing never to be 
realized. The music is too brassy, even foi a Chinese opera, and 
although some of it sparkles (with reminiscence), there is but one 
really good original number, and that is the chorus sung at the 
opening of the second act. Louis Harrison, as the gallery god 
would say, is " the whole show." He is one of the few men in 
this line of production who create the impression that their fun 
is spontaneous. About half of his lines seem to nave been thrown 
in on the spur of the moment. He is extravagant of action, but 
what he does is laughable. He is funny even when he sings, and 
although his " Bing-Binger " is old to San Francisco, he sings it 
as no one else can. Miss Ada Jenoure, the Yum-Yum of the 
opera, is a very graceful prima donna, with a sweet voice, who 
was here with Lydia Thompson a year ago. She makes a great 
deal out of the part, and if we might speak of the more minute 
details of the character, it would be to say that " simple Chinese 
maidens " do not deck their hair in a Japanese manner, nor do 
they wear low slippers. She sang Kelly's " Mulberry Song " in a 
most dainty manner, and won a well-deserved encore. Miss Ber- 
tha Fisch is a very comely soubrette, and created a pleasant 
impression as Finette. John Leach as Sing High, the Chinese 
servant, did too much. His character was too prominent, and he 
did not sing a note. The opera will remain another week. 

# • ■* 

Miss Isabel Morris has never acted better than she has this week 
in the dual role in Hoodman Blind at the Grand Opera House. 
She spoke her lines with excellent spirit and discretion, and acted 
with considerable finish. William Morris has played so many he- 
roic parts in melodrama that he is now a model hero. The scenic 
effects were well-managed, and the entire performance went with 
plenty of life. Next week. The Dandy Fifth, a new military com- 
edy-drama by Frank H. Gassaway, the well-known poet and 



- - 



SAN Ki: LNCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



dramatiM, will b^ [>r.»|n.ril. after an unusually elaborate pr 
lion fry ihaniaDageinanj Hi« t>< il ol 

ihr larj**' i-nnipany wilt appear In the cast) while 100 Dotted Btate'a 
■oMIen have t«*t*n Kr<Mini| t<» give pr-'j't-r effect i" the military plct- 
rbe action ol the play lake* place En Georgia at the time of 
Sherman** march t<> Atlanta, and tin- military features of the plol 
are lapplemented by ■■» strongly conceived love story and a sub-plot 
of comedy. The tilth or baa largely utilised the dramatic material 
afforded vy hla popular war poemfl aacb as ■■ The Pride of Batter 
.;iv." ■■ The General's Cloak," which recently 
appeared in thia paper, and "The Pandy Fifth," from which Ho 1 
title of the play is taken. 

* • * 

.1 Aurtbfe Out will be the attraction on Monday night at the 
-'.reel Theatre. It is (mm the pen of Sydney Rosenfeld, 
and is described as being a surprisingly clever satirical comedy. 
0. M. Remington, who represents .1. M. Hill's Union Square 
Theatre Company, which will appear in the play, speaks in 
glowing terms of its fun producing qualities, and from the names 
which appear in the cast, there is every assurance that the pro- 
duction will have a great deal of merit. It wilt be of interest to 
local theatre-goers to learn that M. A. Kennedy, who was once 
the manager of the Grand Opera House, takes the leading part, 
being that of a garrulous, doting man of middle age, into which 

be puts plenty or humor. 

* • * 

Frank Gassaway will produce a new farce-comedy at the Tivoli 
on the 27th inst., of which much is expected. It ia entitled Hold 
the Forf.— Mme. Zeiss will give a musical concert on the even- 
ing of the 20th. Shenandoah will follow the Juch people at the 

Baldwin. Californians will be pleased to hear that Miss 

Letitia Aldrich. a niece of Senator Stewart, made a most success- 
ful debut in Maid Marian at Washington last Friday. The young 
lady will continue in her stage career, which promises to be an 

eventful one. At Irving Hall, on Monday evening, a farewell 

musicale will be tendered the Misses Adele and Carmelita Ferrer 
and Richard Ferrer. Miss Carrie Milzner, Winfield Blake and 
Senor Arrillaga will assist. The programme is an interesting 

one. Mr. Henry Heyman was the musical director and had 

the general management of Madame de Sadowska-Peixotto and 
Miss Lena Devine's concerts. Both concerts were a great suc- 
cess, justly due to the efforts of Mr. Heyman's untiring energy 

and zeal. Madame Thea Sanderina announces a grand concert 

at Pioneer Hall for Friday evening, January 31st. She will be 

assisted by the best local talent. The ladies of the Church of 

the Advent have arranged an historical carnival, which will com- 
mence at the Mechanics Pavilion to-night and last one week. 

A COMING INDUSTRY. 

COLONEL McDONALD, the Chief of the United States Fish 
Commission, has this to say about the carp in his report for 
the year which has just ended: "It is only a question of time 
when this business of raising carp for the market will become a 
gigantic industry in this country. The progeny of the original 
sixty-five brought over hither fourteen years ago have already 
been distributed in the United States to more than 100,000 ponds 
and sluggish streams. There is not a county in any one of the 
States of the Union where they have not been introduced, and 
when it is considered that each carp grows in three years to weigh 
as many pounds, and lays from 50,000 to 300,000 eggs at a single 
spawn, it will be seen that the " pot fisherman " will find it hard 
work to keep down their numbers. At the present time 10,000,- 
000 pounds of carp are consumed in America annually. This has 
not been realized by the public, for the reason that carp do not 
appear in the markets to any great extent; they are mostly taken 
by consumers from the streams and ponds, thus realizing the 
most important object of the Fish Commission, which was to 
bring to the farmers' doors a new sort of food, giving needed va- 
riety to their tables, and amusement to their children." 

A WELL DESERVED APPOINTMENT. 

OUR congratulations must be extended to Mr. Edward Dan- 
forth, who has lately been appointed by the President to the 
position of Naval Officer of Customs for the State of California, in 
place of Colonel Stuart M. Taylor, whose term of office has ex- 
pired. Mr. Danforth during the last campaign devoted his time 
assiduously to the benefit of the Republican party. His business 
ability was then well displayed, which served Mr. W. W. Morrow 
in good stead. His labors for the good of the party naturally 
gave him a deserved prominence for favors in the gift of the dele- 
gation, and as a consequence he received their unanimous en- 
dorsement. His qualifications and sagacity are such that he will 
no doubt make a good Naval Officer which should not only help 
the party, but popularize the officer with the business commun- 
ity and those having relations with this part of the Federal Gov- 
ernment. 



McAlester& Jones, Real Estate Agents and Rent Collectors: Office 
422 Montgomery street. The best regulated office in the city. Men of experi- 
ence, having studied the wauts of landlords and tenants for 28 years ; reli- 
able, prompt and responsible in the management of real estate, renting, 
selling and collecting, and taking full charge of property at lowest rates. 



BALDWIN THEATRE-GRAND OPERA SEASON. 

Mil Al. Havma>. btaseuiuid Proprietor I &LrRU>BouvtftB, Acting Mt.uaRer 

Sella now on Bale tor s, ad Week, Two Woeks only. Every Evening 

si eep i daudty). Matiuee Saturday. 

EMMA JUCH GRAND ENGLISH OPERA COMPANY. 

100MEM8ERSI M ORCHESTRA I 60 CHORUS I 

I Under the direction of Chas. S. Locke). 

Saturday Malinec-M AKI I'ANA (Only Time). Saturday Evening— Great. 
Novelty— rUB FRE1SCHUTZ. Juch in her great impersonation of Acnes. 

Nextweek— See. nil ami Last Week of the Opera Season. Monday Next 
(Ouly T!me)-HOUEMIAN lilRL-Jueh as Arliue. Tuesday (Last Time)— 
'I ME r.lSIIUON. Wednesday— Jnoh an Marguerite- KAI ST. Thursday— 
.Inch as Mlguou— MIG.NON. Friday— First lime in English iu this city, 
Kosslui's Masterpiece— WILLIAM TELL— Juch as Jemmy. Saturday Mati- 
nee— MAR I'H A. Saturday Evening— Juch as Uilda— RIGOLETIO. 

Next Attraction, January 27lh— Brousou Howard's 

SHENANDOAH I 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Handsomest Theatre in the World. 

Ma. Al Hayman, Lessee aad Proprietor | Mr. Harry Mann Manager 

The Greatest of all Successes! " Or Very Near It ! " Rice & Dixey's 
Elaborate Production of the Successful Comic Opera, 

PEARL OF PEKIN1 

Introduciug the Talented Comediau, LOUIS HARRISON, and 60 Artists. 
Charming Music ! Rollickiug Fun ! Exquisite Costumes ! Matiuee Sat- 
urday Ouly ! 
Eveuiug Prices— 25c, 50c, 75c, $1.00. All Reserved. 

NEW BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Lbavitt.. .Lesseeaud Proprietor | J. J. Gottlob. . .. ...Manager 

Matiuee To-day at 2. Last Nights of VERNONA JARBEAU. in the Most 
Laughable of all Musical Comedies, by Edward Poland, entitled 

STRICTLY CONFIDENTIAL 1 

Introduciug Miss Jarbeau iu her Celebrated Moonlight Daoee. 

Next Monday, January 20th— J. M. HILL'S UNION-SQUARE THEATRE 
COMPANY, iu 

A POSSIBLE CASE I 

tTJ^-Seats now ou sale. 

GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

Magutre, Rial & Osbourne Managers 

Every Night this Week. Matinee Saturday. 

HOODMAN BLINDI 
Wilson Barrett and Arthur Jones' Greatest of all Melodramas. A Story of 
English Rural Life. 

Monday Next— first Production of an Original Military Comedy Drama, 

THE DANDY FIFTH! 

By F. H. Gaspaway. "The Pride of the 5th." "Execution of Old Abe." 

"Death of Taps." "Tossing the Sutler." "Relief of the Fort." "The 

Last Shot." lau People iu ihe Production. 

£!&* Prices — 15c, :25c, 35c, 50c and 75c. 

ALCAZAR THEATRE. 

Wallenrod & Stockwell Managers 

This (Saturday) Evening, January 18th— Another Big Production ! 
THE SHADOWS OF A GREAT CITY I 
Produced with New Scenery and Sensational Effects. The cast will include 
E. J. Buckley, L. R. Stockwell, Ethel Braudou, Clara Jeau Walters, and the 
Alcazar '1 heatre Compauy. 
Best Seats,— 25c, 50c and 7)C. 

Next-JULIA STUART. 

TIVOLI OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreling Bros Proprietors and Managers 

Every Evening until further notice. Another New Comic Opera. First 
Presentation ou any Stage. Vogt and La Fontaine's Spectacular Comic 
Opera, 

FURIOSA! 

THE DAUGHTER OF HADES. 
Magnificently Mounted ! Laughable Situations ! Sparkling Dialogue I 
Spectacular Effects ! Grand Chorus and Orchestra ! 
£Jt^" Our Popular Prices— 25c aud 50c. 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN. 

INSTRUCTORS: 

R. D. YELLAND, ARTHUR F. MATHEWS, AMEDEE JOULLIN, 
OSCAR AND LEE LASH. 

This School is now open, and offers superior inducements to art students. 
Instruction iu regular drawing classes daily from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M., $10 per 
mouth, or $24 per term of three months. 

Instruction in regular painting classes daily from 9 a. m. to 4 p. M., ?12 per 
mouth, or $30 per term of three months. Saturday class from 9 to 4 Satur- 
days, $4 per month, or $12 per term of four months. 

For particulars inquire at the school, 430 Pine street. 

J. R. MARTIN, Secretary. 

FAMILIES LEAVING THE CITY. 

Furniture, Trunks, Pianos, Pictures, Carpets, stored and taken care of 
Having no rent to pay, we store goods low. Advances made. References 
dating back 21 years, given. 

H. W1NDEL & CO..S10 Stockton Street. 



M G. 
SPANISH 



PRITCHARD, 
TRANSLATOR, 



308 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




Jan. 18, 1890. 



THE First Congregational Church is an exclusive organization 
of its kind, where sinners in every walk of life can receive 
glad gospel tidings from the honeyed lips of a fashionable pastor, 
provided they can afford the purple and fine linen of Dives. The 
congregation is aristocratic in the fullest sense of the term, and, 
as one of the deacons recently remarked, there are plenty of other 
churches where poor people can worship without intruding their 
presence among a class which can afford to pay as high for 
religion as for any of the other luxuries of life. The lambs 
however, of this particular flock of self-denying Christians 
would doubtless prefer some more charitable associations. The 
ostentatious display of wealth in lavish ornamentation of tem- 
poral surroundings is not sufficient, for the babes and sucklings of 
the church who generally hanker after something more substan- 
tial than high-toned expositions of doctrinal theories. The recent 
celebration of the annual Christmas festival has done more to shake 
the confidence of the rising generation of Congregationalists than 
years of teaching at the knees of learned preceptors. It was a 
veritable Barmecidal feast. A beautifully decorated hall, well 
lighted and comfortable; but the eyes of the children were fast- 
ened on the Christmas tree, that occupied a conspicuous position 
on the platform. Tableaux were presented, and passed off amid 
the rapturous applause of the juveniles, who were in a mood to 
cheer anything, no matter how dull, anticipating the pleasures in 
store when Santa Claus appeared. But the spirits of the little 
audience fell rapidly to zero later in the evening, when the chill- 
ing announcement was made that no gifts would be distributed 
that evening, but that every child should be sure and attend 
school next Sunday morning, when a nice present would be pro- 
vided for all. The tree was a snare and a delusion, but the sequel 
was, if anything, a severer test for Christian patience and resig- 
nation. At the appointed hour a large party of children was on 
hand, eager for the promised gift. It came at last in the form of 
a new Superintendent, who was introduced as the nicest present 
for one and all which could be suggested. The children have been 
glum over the proposition ever since, but their opinion was voiced 
by one curly-headed youngster, who sharply criticised the gener- 
ous gift, which he considered simply in the light of " a fooler." 

* » » 

Fannie and Jessie were talking of Sam Mayer's vocalization 
some few evenings ago. " There's nothing I like better than to 
hear Sam's singing," said Fannie. "Unless it might be to see 
Frank Carolan," suggested Jessie, and Fannie hasn't seen the 

point yet. 

# # # 

Just one more about Sam. "1 can't make out what makes 
Sam Mayer so reticent about it — so reluctant to tell," said Walter 
Campbell to Dr. Younger during the pauses in having a tooth 
filled. "About what"?" innocently inquired the guileless Doctor. 
"Isn't he always telling us the Anchor's Weighed? " "Yes. 
What of it? " " Why doesn't he tell us its weight? He ought to 
know by this time." 

» ■* * 

They were discussing the reports of balls in the newspapers. 
" I hope the compositors are careful when they set up his name," 
said she, indicating, with a side nod of her classic head, the man- 
ly figure of the youthful Briton from Birkinbead, who was at the 
moment inserting his rimless eye-glass under his right eyebrow. 
" Why? " he asked, bored that any other man should be thought 
of in his presence. " Oh, just think if they put an M in place 
of the B, what a « jolly row ' it would make, don't you know!" 
" Talking of printers' mistakes," said Ed Greenway, who over- 
heard the conversation, "you remember Faison, don't you?" 

" I should think I did," said Miss , feeling the bones on her 

left side under cover of her fan. " Hum ! Well, he once had his 
name changed to Raison in a Washington paper. Always after 
that people used to shout after his partners at balls: < Vous avez 
raison? ' He said it nearly drove him out of the Army." 
» * * 

It is to be sincerely hoped that those five young and handsome 
gentlemen who occupied a box at the Baldwin last Monday night 
are not still laboring a under the hallucination that the social suc- 
cess of the opera was due in any measure to their refining and 
illustrious presence. Undoubtedly it was quite a partierre of 
manly and physical beauty, and most assuredly must have raised 
envious feelings in the breasts of less lucky men, but it was cru«-J 
on the part of one of the performers to have turned up her nose 
at the frantic endeavors of the round-faced and hairless youth 
to draw attention unto himself. 

* # * 

Unknown to the elder part of the community of San Fran- 
cisco, the rising generation have established a new chronology, 
of which Loring Pickering is one of the patron saints. A certain 
youth, not yet of age, but bright enough to make up for his lack 



of years, went to the matinee the other Saturday. Gazing 
around, to his horror he beheld the divinity he worshiped, com- 
ing in with another fellow. Jealousy fired his heart. He gazed 
critically and observed that his rival's hair was thin on the top of 
his head, and sundry other signs which only lovers perceive. 
He waited till they came out, and managed to attract her atten- 
tion long enough to whisper a killing remark into her ear: " Ask 
your new friend if he doesn't remember when the waters of the 
bay came up to Montgomery street?" and with this barb planted 
deep in her heart, he slipped away. His scheme worked to a 
charm. He now enjoys the bliss of hearing the young lady refer 
to his rival as " Pap." 

THE KAISER'S AUTOCRATIC SON. 

THE little Crown Prince of Germany seems to have inherited 
some of the qualities of his father. The Prince was driving 
out with his governess. As usual, the Germans cheered the boy 
or lifted their hats to him as he passed, to which the young 
Prince replied by raising bis bonnet. At last he got bored with 
having continually to acknowledge the salutes of the populace. 
Flinging himself back in the carriage he said to his governess; "I 
am tired now, and shall not lift my bonnet any more to them, no 
matter how much they cheer." " You are a naughty boy," re- 
plied the govorness, "and unless you acknowledge the salutes of 
the people I shall not continue to drive with you." The Crown 
Prince sat up immediately. "Coachman!" said he. The coach- 
man looked around. " Stop the carriage, coachman," continued 
the little one, and, with a lordly wave of the hand toward his 
governess, added, " this lady will get out." -^London Figaro. 

THE Turkish frigate sent to Japan with decorations from the 
Sultan, gave out at Singapore, and the decorations sent on by 
a regular mail steamer. It is alleged that a certain minister knew 
the condition of the ship when he gave the orders for her to sail, 
but that he had reasons of his own for so doing. 



Shainwald, Buckbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented, 
rents collected, real estate bought and sold on commission. Office, 
407-409 Montgomery street. 

MOET 8l CHANDON 



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ESTABLISHED 1854. 



GEORGE MORROW & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

PRIVATE TRADE SOLICITED. 
39 Clay Street, - - - San Francisco. 

MILLS COLLEGE, 

Alamefla County, Cal. 

Spring Term opened JANUARY 9, 1S90. For full information address 

C. C. STRATTON, President. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



THE RAILROADS. 

CPRKD CBO( Kli: Vice President of the Bontbem 
mtpanj, left this city last Tuesday night, via Port- 
land, fur New York. 

The iaya i" serve two masters satisfactorily at 

the same Htne has always been considered a difficult work, and 
mad tin Pacific, In striving for business which does not legit- 
imately belong to it. has succeeded in creating enmity not only in 
mntry which it ha-* invaded, but also in the country which 
bofll the line by subsidies ol most extraordinary liberality, with 
the expectation that it would be employed solely to develop thi- 
ns which it penetrates. The Canadian Pacific has a territory 
in Canada vast enough to employ all its energies, but in reaching 
out for traffic in this country in competition with our own lines 
!t baa yielded to the temptation to make rates which very evi- 
dently put it in the position of discriminating against localities 
in Canada, as the examples above given indicate. The Congress 
of the United States and the Parliament of Canada between them 
ought to be able to enrb the too-ambitious tendencies of this great 
company, and compel it to pay its first attention to the develop- 
ment of its own country, even if it has to cease its competition 
at unreasonably low rates with therailways of the United States." 

The purchase of the Laundry Farm road by W. M. Rank, Eli 
Denison and Colonel Myer from Colonel Woodward, and the 
prompt way its new owners have undertaken contracts to fur- 
nish Oakland with paving material, shows that these enterprising 
gentlemen do not intend to let the rails rust, or the road beds be 
covered with fine grass crops. Mr. Rank is the well-known agent 
of the Denver and Rio Grande; Colonel Myer is a gentleman with 
large coal interests on the line of the Rio Grande, while General 
Eli I'enison is well known to the people of the coast as being the 
literary purveyor of the Southern Pacific Company. 

Rumor is still busy with the name of the Illinois Central in con- 
nection with the projected line to Puget Sound, notwithstanding 
the resolution passed at the late meeting of the stockholders that 
nothing should be done with the new lines, the strong opinion 
being expressed that the road was already long enough. That 
the Puget Sound road will be built, however, seems to be a gener- 
ally accepted fact. It will run from Sioux Falls, S. Dakota, to 
Butte, Montana, thence to Lolo Pass of the Bitter Root Mountains, 
crossing the Columbia River and going through the Cispas Pass 
in the Cascades, paralleling the Northern Pacific. 

The Southern Pacific will run a fast excursion train from this 
city to New Orleans for those who wish to attend the famous 
Mardi Gras festival. The train will be run on good time, and the 
distance from here to New Orleans will be covered in three and 
three quarter days. The date of its start is fixed for Feb. 12 at 
5 o'clock r. m. The itinerary is as follows: San Francisco 5 p. m. ; 
Bakersfield, next day, 3:50 a.m.; Los Angeles 12:20 m. ; Tucson, 
Feb. 14,6:10 a.m.; EI Paso, Feb. 14, 7:30 p.m.; New Orleans, 
Feb. 16, 12 m. The train will have a dining car attached to it. 

R. H. Pratt, Assistant General Superintendent, who has had 
general charge of repairing the breaks in the railroads caused by 
the recent storms, has returned to the city. His efforts have been 
eminently successful. While contending against great odds, he 
succeeded in putting the roads in good traveling shape during the 
prevalence of the storm. 

The San Joaquin Valley farmers are happy. The recent rains 
insure them an enormous crop, and the almost certain completion 
of what is known as the Tracey branch of the Southern Pacific 
will give them cheap transportation. It is expected that the 
road will be finished to its connection with the main line during 
the coming summer. 

Fred T. Berry, Traveling Passenger and Freight Agent of the 
Santa Fe, with headquarters at Portland, has been spending the 
holidays with his family in Oakland. He returned to his post 
on Wednesday last. 

The financial report of the Canadian Pacific shows a large sur- 
plus for 1889 over operating expenses. Its profit for the year is 
over $3,000,000. 

The Rio Grande Western Railway will probably complete the 
widening of its gauge by the first of April. 

J. M. Fillmore, manager of the Port Harford and San Luis 
Obispo road, was in the city during the week. 



Major Benjamin Truman has returned from Paris, and was at 
Fourth and Townsend during the week. 

Gilmore's Celebrated Band uses the Decker Bros'.— the artists'— 
piano. Kobler & Chase sole agents, who sell at low prices and on 
easy terms. 



FINE OLD PORT. 




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Of perfect aud reliable purity, uuequaled for medicinal and table use, and 
guaranteed l>y snippers. 



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Charles Meinecke & Co., 

Sole Agents. 
314 Sacramento St., San Francisco. 



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—FOR— 

MEN AND WOMEN. 

GOODYEAR RUBBER CO. 
R. H. PEASE, Jr., ) ( 

' > Agents. 

S. M. RUNYON, \ 
577 and 579 Market St., 




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10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 18, 1890. 




PUGILISTIC. — Billy Murphy succeeded in whipping Ike Weir 
last Monday night at the California Athletic Club. The win- 
ner stepped into the ring in fine condition, while Weir, who had 
not trained as seriously as he should have, was six and a half 
pounds over weight. The supposition was that the contest was 
to be for the feather-weight championship of the world, but under 
the existing circumstances, Murphy alone being within the 118- 
pound limit, that championship remains to be fought for. It is 
not probable that Weir will ever again get down to the feather- 
weight class without weakening himself so that he will be " dead 
meat" for the better men in that class. The battle, lasting four- 
teen rounds, was one of the best ever witnessed in California, and 
while the Belfast Spider succumbed he showed more cleverness 
than any boxer who has yet been seen here. His ducking, jab- 
bing, getting in and out were admirable, but his monkeying was 
simply deplorable. If Weir proposes to make a clown of himself, 
he should join a circus, where he would certainly be more suc- 
cessful than he was with Murphy. His queer antics in this fight 
wore him out, and the severe punishment he received about the 
stomach during clinches did the rest. Murphy received facial 
punishment and occasional stunning swings that were discour- 
aging. Weir seemed to be able to get in on him when he chose, 
but the plucky little Australian fought his uphill battle bravely. 
This is the advantage of the pugilistic education of the Antip- 
odes. There they have no such thing as classes. There is but 
one champion, and he must be a man who will meet all comers. 
Naturally he is a heavy-weight. Feather-weights, light and mid- 
dle-weight champions are unknown, and, as a result, it occurs 
frequently that the contests are between men far from being at 
weight. In such cases the smaller man often fights an uphill 
battle, and he is not in the least disgraced if whipped. Had the 
general run of American fighters found themselves in Murphy's 
place, so handicapped by weight and science, they would have 
lost heart, and, before the eighth round, would have lost the bat- 
tle. The Australian was game, took punishment and did the 
rushing. He set the pace throughout. He appeared not to be 
doing much damage, simply because his blows were delivered at 
close quarters and in the region of the stomach. His blows were 
effective, however — so much so that Weir began to fail from the 
middle of the eighth round. 

It is amusing to read the accounts of the fight as published in 
the dailies. Relying on them, one would believe that Weir did 
all the hitting and was never touched. It looked as though he 
had deliberately laid down, forfeiting his claim to the feather- 
weight championship of the world (which he lost, although Mur- 
phy did not win it), and losing about $2,000. That is about the 
most ridiculous thing heard in a long time. There must be an 
object where there is a fake. That object is invariably a moneyed 
one. Had there been many thousands of dollars wagered on the 
fight, there might have been a chance of collusion. As it was, 
there was less than $2,400 wagered in this city, and next to noth- 
ing was put up in the East. Providing Weir and Murphy con- 
trolled all the betting, which is a matter of impossibility, each 
would have received less than a thousand dollars, while taking 
the biggest kind of chances of not getting the $2,000 purse. If 
the sporting reporters of the dailies knew more about sport they 
would put more common-sense in their smoothly written, but 
fact-lacking, accounts of fights. 

There is not a dissenting opinion among men who are authori- 
ties in the matter; it was a square and great fight. 

Tommy Warren is looking for a battle with Billy Murphy; 
probably he will get it. 

The next big fight on the books is that between Jack Dempsey 
and McCarthy. The outlook is not bright for it to ever come off, 
and there is just a probability that poor Jack will never again en- 
ter the ring. In the past few weeks he has fallen away most ter- 
ribly. The gallant " Nonpareil," who fought strong at 154 
pounds is only a skeleton of his former self. He weighed ex- 
actly 133 pounds this week, and before the date set for the fight 
this month, quick consumption may claim him as a victim. An 
effort has been made by Dempsey's more intimate friends to keep 
the bad news from spreading, but it is useless to hide it longer. 
Jack has not the strength to battle even with a child. 

YACHTING.— The McDonough yacht will not show her lines 
much before March. The new craft is boarded up, and the set- 
ting of the masts and rigging is all that is needed to fit her for 
sea. There is no enforced delay, and the launching is only de- 
ferred because the owner has no desire to try his craft before de- 
cent weather is guaranteed. 

There is a prospect of the Aggie again claiming San Francisco 
as an anchorage. The Oil man who owns her is reported to have 
turned his attention to horses, and Captain White, the most suc- 
cessful skipper the big centre-board schooner ever had, has 
horses to trade for a yacht. If the Aggie comes home, the rivalry 
between her, the McDonough boat, the Lurline and the pilot-boat 
America, will infuse new life into the now nearly dead sport. 



BASEBALL. — At this time affairs in baseball circles are very 
quiet; the managers of the different clubs are selecting their 
players for next season. From the character of the men engaged 
thus far, the clubs will be stronger and even more nearly matched 
than last season, there being a very wide field to draw upon. 
The California League met last Saturday evening in Sacramento 
to close up the business of last season and inaugurate next sea- 
son. The championship was awarded to Oakland. J. J. Mone 
was reelected President and Treasurer, and M. E. Finn Secretary. 
It was decided to retain the same cities in the league as last year. 
The retention of Stockton, however, depends upon that city de- 
positing, before February 1st, in the hands of the President, a 
certified check for $2,000. Should she fail to do so, San Jose will 
be admitted in her place, as that city is in theposition to take her 
place. The Stockton people say when the time comes the check 
will be produced. Should Fresno develop sufficient interest to 
sustain a club, that city will be admitted as a member of the 
league next year. 

Several of the players who are going East, together with a num- 
ber of ex-players of the California League, have arranged to play 
exhibition games at Central Park. They could not play last 
Thursday, because of the bad condition of the grounds. Should 
there be heavy batting, a feature of the games will be the number 
of balls lost, of which the youngsters outside the fences will take 
due advantage. The California League followed a wise policy in 
closing up their grounds and giving the public a rest. 

The society boys are preparing a series of games to be played 
on Saturdays at the Haight-street grounds between January 25th 
and March 15tb. There will be no admission charged. 

Next season Oakland will have Friday games. 

The case of the New York Club against Ward has been sub- 
mitted to the court in New York City for decision. It may be 
decided within a week. 

The Chairman of the Arbitration Committee has notified the 
clubs in the East to keep their hands off of California League 
players. 

With three games a week in this city and one in Oakland next 
season, the players will be in constant practice. The season will 
commence March 23d and end November 23d. 

ATHLETIC. — Peter Mclntyre, the sprinter, who has had charge 
of the Olympic club's outdoor grounds, is likely to die of a 
broken heart if the rain continues. Peter has labored strenuously 
for six months to turn the grounds over to the club, but always 
when on the verge of completing his contract the weather has 
upset his doings, and pegged him back a full row. Washington's 
birthday has been fixed as the date for the formal opening, and 
Captain Jordan has prepared an interesting programme. 

The California Athletic Club's amateur annex has applied for 
admission into one of the national associations, and has been 
branded as a professional organization by some anonymous 
writer. It is to be hoped that the writer is not an Olympic man; 
that club has already strained the limit in its opposition to the 
California Club Amateurs. 

The San Francisco Bicycle Club banqueted itself last Saturday 
night. 

The wheelmen are waiting for the sun to get around, so that 
their wheels can go round, an impossibility during the present 
condition of the roads. 



ORCHIDS. 

THE orchids, conquerers of the light, may well claim pardon 
for triumph over their humble companions of the garden, for 
their victory is fairly achieved. They astonish us when we first 
examine them, and then charm us. Nature has been liberal with 
them, and they have everything. Their flowers are full of that 
curious charm that captivates. Their colors are harmoniously 
toned, and always bright and elegant. Their odor is sweet and 
penetrating, but does not cloy. Notwithstanding their thin tex- 
ture, which gives them a delicate and frail air, they last longer 
than other ornamental flowers. Nothing, in fact, seems to be 
wanting to them but a more lively and abundant foliage; and 
that can be supplied by mingling fern leaves with them. It was 
long supposed that these wonderful plants were extremely deli- 
cate and capricious. This was a mistake. To their other virtues 
they join the rare one of simplicity. Nearly all the orchids culti- 
vated in greenhouses are natives of the intertropical zone, and it 
was supposed from this fact that they required considerable heat. 
But it has gradually been established that a high temperature 
really hinders their best development. A considerable number 
of them in their native state grow on high mountains, under ex- 
posure to a bracing atmosphere; and they are now cultivated in 
moderately warmed and freely ventilated greenhouses. They are 
therefore relatively hardy plants, well adapted to the decoration 
of our rooms. — Popular Science Monthly. 

So strong a recommendation should not go unnoticed, for Dr. W. 
E. W T illiams, of Cambria, Wis., says: "1 induced our leading phy- 
sicians to give Best Tonic a trial, which proved superior to their ex- 
pectations, and its merits proven by their frequent prescriptions. It 
is gaining favor daily." 



New Series. Plate 30. 



Wit*}. S. F\ Mews better. January 18, 1890. 




SRnTOH & REVj AHTO. 



EXTERIOR OF A HINDOO MOSQUE. 

From tne Original Painting, now in the S. <5r G. Gump Collection, by Edwin Lord Weeks. 



Jan IS, 1890 



BAN PB INGISGO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



EXTERIOR OF A HINDOO MOSQUE. 
Artotype N E Plate 30. 

rtlKKRtrr few utttta in the World who have attained SO K r, ' :lt 
a prominence at home and abroad :is Bdwln Lord Woeka, and 
lis pictures which have been exhibited, both in this country and 
Europe, have at once made him take rank among the great living 
painters. Mr. Week* wa.« born in Boston, in 1849, and after a 
DOtt thorough coarse o! study at home, he entered the School of 
he Beaux Arts in Paris. Nol yet satisfied with what he knew, 
ie entered the ateliers of Q£rome and Leon Bonnat, where, under 
heir masterly tuition, he laid the foundation for his skill in bril- 
iant coloring and solid handling. Mr. Weeks has taken high 
tonors for his pictures. In the ISSi* Saion he was awarded a 
bird-class medal for his painting, and for the two paintings of 
he Paris Exposition of 1889 he was awarded a first-class medal. 
ie is a member of the Society of French Artists, and has the 
eputation of being one of the very best American artists in 
'aris. The proof of this is that his pictures always find a ready 
ale at high prices among the art collectors of London, Paris, New 
fork and Boston. He is a most pains-taking and laborious 
rorker, and never commences a picture until he has thoroughly 
nastered the subject and studied it from every conceivable aspect. 
lis illustrations of Eastern life and customs are something re- 
narkable, and in order to gain a true know ledge of Asiatic life 
nd surroundings, he spent a great deal of bis time in Cairo, 
erusalem, Damascus, Tangiers and India. His knowledge of the 
ife that obtains in Hindustan can be seen in that admirable pic- 
ure, •• Exterior of a Hindoo Mosque," of which we give an arto- 
ype, the original being in the Gump collection. India is un- 
oubtedly a picturesque country, full of lights and shadows, and 
Jr. Weeks has seized upon a subject which has given his clever 
rush ample opportunity to show what a splendid master he 'is 
f coloring, and his pencil the chance to demonstrate that he is a 
killful drawer. The charm of this picture is its faithfulness to 
ife. Before the spacious stairway have come devotees on ele- 
ibant and horseback. By the first step sits on his cloth some 
iiKr, telling some wondrous story to the simple peasant of what 
ood luck would befall him did he but give him alms, and further 
n is the bazar wallah selling some sort of confectionery. There 
i no painter yet who has treated with greater effect and with 
uch unhesitating directness the grand architecture of India, with 
heir richness and splendor of detail, and the picture which is 
ow being spoken about is a magnificent example of Mr. Weeks' 
rork. 



THE NEGRO AS A MENTOR. 



3N E of the most plausible prima facie schemes that have yet been 
prosposed for the civilization of equatorial Africa has taken 
he form of organizing an expedition of American negroes to set- 
le among and colonize their less civilized brethren on the Congo 
nd other regions, which are now attracting the attention of white 
immigrants. The idea is, to say the least, an ingenious one, and 
ia utility would of course consist in the moral suasion, coupled 
,'ith the intellectual ascendency, which the civilized African 
/■ould exercise over the other. The mimetic faculty is, as is well- 
nown, strong in the Ethiopian, and such potentates as the King 
f Dahomey, for instance, might doubtless copy with advantage 
he style and general toumure of Mr. Brown of South Carolina, or 
Ir. Johnson of New York. Still, as the old adage goes, •' it is a 
ad rule that won't work both ways," and it is just possible that 
he would-be instructor might end by becoming pupil instead of 
master. It has been proved that an inferior race, when removed 
rom the elevating influence of superior surroundings, will fall 
ack into its natural barbarism, with the same ease as water gravi- 
ates down hill. This same African experiment is not new, and, 
ried on a small scale, has turned out badly in the past. The 
American gentleman of color — he who had really tasted the sweets 
f civilization and was a true believer in Caucasian methods — 
/■ould disdain to associate with the dusky savage whom such as- 
ociation might benefit ; and as for the voodoo and fetish worship- 
rs of the southern swamps, readily as they might affiliate with 
aeir ancient congeners of the soil, would from the very nature of 
he case, have no beneficial influence to exercise. It is just possi- 
le that a sprinkling of the well-behaved and industrious Ameri- 
an negro element, introduced into the Congo country as an ad- 
anct or accessory of Caucasion immigration, and awed by the re- 
training influence of the latter, might act as a sort of intermedi- 
ry link, form a common camping ground, so to speak, and lessen 
he friction between the diversities of race. The idea appears to 
e favored by the Belgians interested in Congo colonization, and 
a the manner suggested might perhaps be worth a trial. 

The first thing that Mine. Patti asks when she arrives here is how 
re her dear friends who own the Original Swain's Bakery, at 213 
utter street. The great diva has traveled all over the world, but she 
as never eaten a meal like they set at this fashionable restaurant, 
nd of which she is very fond. 



At Moraghan's, in the California Market, oysters can be bought 
aore cheaply than in any place in town. 



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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 18, 1810. 




New Yobk, January 9, 1890. 

LA GRIPPE has ceased to be a matter for jeat in New York. 
The city's streets are one vast funeral procession. One can- 
not go out without feeling an intense melancholy for the very 
apparent grief of household after household of mourners. The 
death-list counts over two hundred daily, and in the Roman Cath- 
olic cemetery alone there were one hundred ami twenty-six in- 
terments on Sunday last. The weather is so beautiful that one 
forgets its death-dealing influence. The dampness in the air 
makes it only soft and balmy, but it has brought out a curious 
green fungus growth upon the browns tone houses and doorsteps, 
that suggests anything rather than a healthful climate. 

La grippe is the one topic of conversation. Everybody who 
has not got it knows some one who has, and every one who has 
recovered is explaining how he happened to get well; and every- 
body in general is coughing and wheezing in a distressing way. 

Nevertheless, as there are two sides to the world, one of which 
laughs while the other one weeps, the routs and balls and theatre 
parties go on night after night with just as much verve and gaiety 
as if no epidemic were prevalent. 

The enthusiasm of the New Year's ball was still in the hearts 
of the Four Hundred, for they turned out bravely to give tone to 
the Chanty Ball, which was the most brilliant one seen in years, 
and quite restored prestige to that entertainment, which, it must 
be admitted, was rather lacking last year. Mrs. Frederick Sharon 
with her brother, Mr. and Mrs. Henry .lanin, Mr. and Mrs. C. P. 
Huntington, Miss Ida Scoorfy, Mr. H. B. McDowell, Mrs. Romu- 
aldo Pacheco, Mrs. Theresa Fair, Miss Fair and Miss Belle Smith. 
Miss Fair was radiantly beautiful, and excited great admiration. 
One of the sensations of the evening was the magnificent display 
of diamonds worn by Mrs. Philip Armour of Chicago. They were 
even more gorgeous than those worn by Mrs. Astor at the New 
Year's ball, and infinitely more artistic. From her right shoulder 
across the front of her decollete gown was a night of diamond 
swallows of varying sizes, and full of resplendent stones. On the 
same evening Mrs. Harry Gillig gave a theater party at the first 
production of The Gondoliers at the Park Theater. Mr. Frank lin- 
ger and Mr. Marshall Wilder, the humorist. Marshall Wilder, by 
the way, will doubtless be with you next year, to give bis eve- 
nings' of monologues and songs. He is the spoiled child of New 
Y'ork, and his cheery manner and ready wit make him a more than 
welcome guest in every drawing room. He has been over every 
year for several years to England, and is an especial protege of 
the Prince of Wales. 

Miss Ermentine Poole has just returned to New Y'ork after a 
prolonged tour through the Eastern cities. She spent several 
days in Montreal and went from there to Washington, where she 
bad the pleasiire of meeting several California friends. In Phila- 
delphia she had the pleasure of attending the Pan American re- 
ception, where she was again among California friends. Miss 
Poole expects to leave for California at tlxe end of this month. 

An old Califomian, whose husband, Theodore Thieler, was 
among the pioneers and died in the early days, has just suc- 
cumbed to the prevailing epidemic. There are very few of the 
pioneers in New York. 

The New York Herald will, before this reaches you, have pub- 
lished what is expected to be the sensation of the year. It will 
be $ a revelation of the methods of the Geological survey ,and is said 
to involve the leading colleges and universities in the United 
States. I am told that more than one paper feared to publish the 
article, and one prominent morning paper was, it is said, paid 
twenty-five hundred dollars to refuse the article. The ITerald, I 
am told, has been authorized from Egypt by James (iorden Ben- 
nett to publish the article and engage counsel. There is sup- 
pressed excitement in the air at Yale and the Pennsylvania 
University especially. Trix. 

THE Colombian merchants of Carthagena have succeeded in 
making some trouble for our shippers who deal with the north- 
ern Isthmian ports, says the New York Mail and Express. They 
have induced the government to dig up an old law that requires 
foreign trading vessels to land first at Carthagena and reship their 
cargoes before going to Colombian ports on the Isthmus. Of 
cour.se such a law, if carried out, will effectually destroy the trade 
of our shippers. One firm has sent an armed vessel down there 
to rescue some cargoes of theirs that have been detained. Of 
course, it is possible that something may occur that will cause 
strained relations between our government and the United States 
of Colombia, but it is hardly probable. Their government, when i 
its attention is properly called to the subject, will no doubt modi- 
fy or rescind the obnoxious laws, and trade will go on uninter- 
rupted 

Fine Arts. — The European collection of fine oil paintings from 
Paris Salon, Munich Academy of Art and other art centers of 1889 
are now on exhibition and for sale at our Art Room, 581 and 583 Mar- 
ket street. S. & G. Gump. 



THE ETHICS OF DIVORCE. 

LET society rejoice. At last the Courts have arisen in their dig- 
nity and denied a divorce. Among all the broken marriage 
ties recorded last week for trivial or for good cause, let praise be 
accorded Judge Hunt's Courc for this one denial, which will en- 
able the ship of State to right itself and recover its equilibrium 
again. In 1882 (seven years ago, observe) a wife was deserted by 
her husband. She has waited until 1889 before she began her 
suit for divorce, thefefore it was denied. Because, forsooth, of 
her forbearance, she is to be punished. If she had been smart, 
now, she could have been divorced in 1883, married the man over 
again in '84, been divorced in '85, married some one else in 'S6, 
and be ready for new adventures by this time. But simply be- 
cause she did not rush into court to air her grievances while they 
were fresh, because she had no other man in tow, for whom she 
wanted to ship her spouse, because she was conscientious and 
tried the experiment of getting along without a divorce as long as 
possible, therefore she was denied release. Ten years from now 
her case will be worse than ever, though to the uninitiated a de- 
sertion of eighteen years would naturally seem to be more griev- 
ous than one of two or three years. She will have a chance to 
wish several thousand times that she had danced into court when 
all her bruises were bright and blue, and waved her broom 
around, and demanded her divorce papers the very day her per- 
fidious John skipped out. Law is a queer thing, for instead of 
this lovely little picnic, she will have to remain as she is — doomed 
to eternal separation from that John, doomed to a changeless and 
awful monotony if ?he lives for fifty years, each year making it 
more binding — no John, no husband, and yet more firmly riveted 
in the chains of matrimony till she is swallowed up in the sea of 
time. 

THERE is a rumor that the Russian Government intends short- 
ly to issue an enormous military consolidated loan, to raise 
money to defray the expenses of new riHes and other military 
expenditures. 

J. F. Cutter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated Whisky is for sale by all 
druggists aud first-class grocers. Trade mark— star withiu a shield. 

BAUKS. 

BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 

WM. ALVORD, President. 
Thomas Beown. Cashier | B. Mubbay, Jr .. . Assistant Cashier 

AGENTS: 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bank; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Saving Bank; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent 
in London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Correspondents in India, 
China, Japan and Australia. 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver t Salt Lake, 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Augeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen, 
Hamburg, Frankiort-ou-the-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong, 
Shanghai, Yokohama. Genoa, and all cities in Italy and Switzerland. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN DANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 | Paid Up Capital $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $350,000. 

Head Office .58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd.). No. lOWall St.,N Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie.l7Bonle- 
vard Poiseoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com- 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. DAVID CAHN, / «„„„„ 

EUGENE MEYER, j MaQ agers. 
C. Altschtjl, Cashier. 

THiE~ NEVADA DANK OF SAN FRANCISCO." 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

Agency at New Yobk... 62 Wall Street 

Agency at Vibginia, Nevada. 

London Bankebs Union Bank of London (Limited) 

01 HECTORS: 

JAMES L. FLOOD President 

JNO. W. MAl'KA\ A. E. DAVIS, R. H. FOLLIS, J. F. BIGBLOW. 

THE GERMAN SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY. - 

No. 626 California Street. San Francisco 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND $ 1,065.000 00. 

Deposits July 1st, 1889 19.540,822 34. 

Offlcers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRU8E ; 
Second Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT ; 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Chas. Meiuecke, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. 
Van Bergen, E. Meyer, O. Schoemaun, B. A. Becker. Attorneys, Jabboe, 
Habbison and Goodfellow. _ 

WELLS, FAR60 ¥TOMPANY-DANKINe DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,694.8C5,04 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President; Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President: Leland Stan- 
ford. Chas. F. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. Wadsworth, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Ban kin 
Business. 



Jan. H. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



13 



HiE'Ro; 




B-A-3STICS. 



LIFE IN SLEEP.— '- -lomrni. 

1 the conscious life I know — 

The conscious life of amilea anil tears. 
I'ntiring in its ebb and How, 

In what it feels and sees and hears — 
I live the vagrant life of sleep: 

- set) wild, Fantastic, or perchance 
Vague as the wandering mists that keep 

The sunlight in their gray expanse. 
And yet this second life to me 

I? real in some mysterious way. 
It wafts me over land and sea, 

Through starry night and golden day; 
It leads me back into the past, 

Or gives the aching present hope; 
And there are hours when, strange and vast, 

It speaks and bids the future ope. 
It laughs at time, it laughs at space; 

It binds and frees me at its will; 
It has the summer's sportive grace, 

It has the winter's cruel chill. 
Age withers at its touch, and youth 

Revives with hardy bloom and breath: 
Joy bubbles from the heart of truth 

As if the dead has not known death. 



THE GOOD.— J". Boyle O'Reilly in Georgetown Journal. 

" What is the real good?" 
I asked in musing mood. 

Order, said the law court; 
Knowledge, said the school; 
Truth, said the wise man; 
Pleasure, said the fool; 
Love, said the maiden; 
Beauty, said the page; 
Freedom, said the dreamer; 
Home, said the sage; 
Fame, said the soldier; 
Equity, the sear; — 

Spake my heart full sadly: 
" The answer is not here." 

Then -within my bosom 
Softly this I heard: 
" Each heart holds the secret; 
Kindness is the word." 



M"Y SWEETHEART. 



" You have heard of the osier-bridges, thrown 
O'er the rivers of old Peru, 
Strong as an iron chain, yet swayed 
By the lightest breeze that blew. 
Thus I am flinging a bridge of thought 
To-night, my love, towards you. 

Of many a firm yet tender strand, 

I have woven the fabric light; 
Many a wish for your future weal, 

Many a greeting bright — 
Stems, which out of the stream of Love, 

Have risen for you to-night, 

And thoughts and hopes of a deeper growth 

With my lighter fancies blend, 
Thoughts that would fain find echo sweet 

From your heart at the farther end. 
Half-way across my osier-bridge, 

Meet me to-night, my friend. 

PEARLS— London World. 

You came, and so the labor of my day 
Changed with your coming to a bright array 

Of toil as light as laughter after woe, 
And work seemed beautiful and sweet and gay, 

So that I craved for nothing more, although 
You came, and so — ! 
But when you said you could no longer stay, 
The still strong love that slept awoke to say, 

«<Ah, no! my sweet, I may not let you go. 
You made me labor gladly — now we play! 

I might have worked alone, but, dear, you know 
You came — and so — ?" 



CAPITAL PAID UP. 
RESERVE FUND. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Inr..rporated by Royal Charter. 



$2,500,000 
575,000 



Southeast comer California and SanBome Streets. 
Head Office— 28 OORNHILL. London. 

Branches— Victoria. British Columbia; Portland. Oregon ; Seattle and Tacoma. 
Washington. 

Sub-Branches— New Westminster, Vancouver. Nanalmo and Kamloops. British 
Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub 
Ject to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
upon its Head Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

NEW YOKK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IKE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland; MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America; CHINA and JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China; AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND-Bank of 
Australasia, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD (Westludies)-Colonial Bank. 

~tW7irst national bank, 

V W, Corner Sansome and IIusli Streets. 

Established 1870. u s. Depositary. 

CAPITAL (PAID UP) $7.600 00* 

SURPLUS. 500.000 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 69,200 

8. G. MURPHY .President! E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOFFITT. ... Vice-President | GEO. W.KLINE Ass't Cashier 

Directors— Geo. A. Low, N. Van Bergen, Jas. H. Jennings, George C. 
Perkins, James D. Phelau, John A. Hooper, James M. Donahue, S. G. Mur- 
phy, James Moffitt. 

Trausacts a genera] banking business. Issues Commercial and Travelers' 
Credits. Buys and Sells Exchange on London, Dublin, Paris, the principal 
cities of Germany and the United States. Collections made and prompt 
returns rendered at market rates of exchange. 

Deposit Y;ui Us Department, James H. Lynch, Manager. 
SAFES TO RENT AT FROM ?5 TO $100 PER ANNUM. 

Families giving up housekeeping or moving out of town can store their 
silverware and other valuables in our vaults, tafe from dangers of every 
kind, at reasonable rates. 

THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIAN BANK, Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized le.OPO.OOO | Paid up.. $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 050,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel Court, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makei tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
and bullion. FRED. F. LOW, I Manfl( , p , s 

IGN. STEINHART.l ^«*«B«s> 
P. N. Lilienthal. Cashier. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Capital and Reserve, $2,415,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. | London Office 73 Lombard Si", E. C. 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, William Steel. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan <fc Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets, J1 9,724,538.46. 

President, BENJAMIN F. STEVENS. I Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENS. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 
324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

'SECURITY SAVIN6S BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300,000 

OFFICERS: 

President ..JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary S. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. S. JONES I Attorney. SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL J1.000.000. 

DIRECTORS : 
OHAS. P. CROCKER, I E. H. MILLER, Jr. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH •■■ ..President. 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashier. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C WEBER President I ERNST BRAND Secretary 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 18, 1890. 




FOR the information of many inquirers, who do not understand 
the connection of Hamilton with the Union Gold Company of 
London, we now give a brief history of one of the most infamous 
swindles ever perpetrated on any community. About three 
years ago a shingle displayed in the Phelan building called atten- 
tion to the fact that U. A. Hamilton, artist, had a studio there 
somewhere near the roof. But the proprietor had far loftier ideas, 
and in his day-dreams indulged the pleasing hope, that at a pe- 
riod not far distant, he would win wealth and renown as a finan- 
cier. Having gained a smattering of technical terms in visiting 
some Mexican mines, and enjoyed a short-lived experience with 
some miners in Esmeralda county, Nevada, the paint brush and 
camera were thrown to the winds, and thenceforth the artist posed 
as a full-fledged mining expert. An opportunity presented itself 
to float mining property on the London market, and Hamilton 
was not slow to take advantage of it. The Rathgeb mine of 
Calaveras was brought to his notice by some parties, who were 
afterwards forced to sue for their commissions, and the owners 
agreed to bond the property for a good, round sum. 
IIS 

ATRIP to London was next in order, and a little Hebrew 
tailor on Market street swears in a suit which he also was 
compelled to bring after Hamilton had succeeded in floating the 
property, that he advanced the necessary funds for traveling and 
other expenses. When Hamilton arrived in London he became 
associated with the notorious " Baron " Grant, and with his as- 
sistance the Rathgeb was launched on the public as the Union 
Gold, with a capital stock most extravagantly inflated. The 
News Letter, on this showing, took the matter up, warning in- 
vestors against the swindle, and calling attention to the fact that 
experts for local capitalists had reported unfavorably on the 
property, which was only valued by the owners at about ten per 
cent, of what the foreign investors had been asked to pay for it. 
These statements interfered considerably with the scheme of 
Grant and Hamilton, requiring some pretty tall talking on either 
side to bolster up confidence. Many persons in England will 
doubtless remember the first annual meeting of the company, 
when Grant got up and referred to the celebrated mining engin- 
eer Charles Hamilton, who in turn corroborated the " Baron's " 
mendacious promise that within a short space of time the mine 
would pay regular dividends at the rate of twenty per cent. 

*** 

THE shares of the Union Gold were successfully disposed of, 
and Hamilton came out as its general manager and superin- 
tendent with a fat salary. His old-time friends and associates 
pleaded in vain for a division of the plunder. The little tailor 
appealed to the courts for coin advances, and the same course 
was taken by the men who had got the bond from the owners. 
Judgments were obtained all round, but it is doubtful if a dollar 
has ever been recovered from Hamilton. In the meantime the 
new superintendent proceeded wiih the erection of a mill, which, 
when finished, was one of the most complete ever built on the 
Pacific Coast. When it was ready to start up it was suddenly 
discovered that the ground on which it was built did not belong 
to the company, who were sued and mulcted in heavy damages 
before the matter was finally settled. Financial troubles followed, 
and although flaming dispatches were from time to time sent to 
the London shareholders, they have yet to hear of any bullion. 
In the meantime money was required to pay off the owners. 
Hamilton had only paid so much on account, so that after the 
shareholders had paid for the expensive mill erected on other 
people's property, they at last found thomselves in the position 
of having to raise another large sum of money or forfeit the prop- 
erty, mill and all. 

II $ 

HAMILTON in the meantime had slid out, and Grant followed. 
The shareholders, in the attempt to save the property, 
adopted the plan of reconstruction, and again the Company came 
out under the new title of the Cordova Union Gold. The efforts 
made were, however, unsuccessful. No one could be persuaded 
to take up with such shady class of investment, and in conse- 
quence the property, bran new mill, ditches and appurtenances, 
involving an expenditure in the neighborhood of $500,000, has 
reverted to the original owners of the property, who were also 
paid a large sum of money in gold coin. Mining men who know 
the property, on which so much good money has been spent, will 
probably be surprised at these statements of fact. And yet 
people wonder why California mining propositions are looked 
upon with suspicion abroad. If Rathgeb could have raised $75,000 
for his property in the first instance, he would have been well 
paid. Coleman, Kerwin and other experts reported unfavorably 
on this property at the time Hamilton was negotiating for it. 
How this man can expect people to place any confidence in him 
aftm such a scandalous affair as the Union Gold, is difficult to 
conceive. The shareholders of this company should inaugurate 
an investigation into the scheme and conduct of its manipulators. 



A few more lessons like those of the Glasgow Bank Directors 
might have a beneficial effect in this quarter. 
I I I 

WE are indebted to Wells, Fargo & Co. for the following statis- 
tics relating to the yield of precious metals produced in the 
states and territories west of the Missouri River, also British Co- 
lumbia and the west coast of Mexico. The report is for the year 
just passed, and shows that in the aggregate gold to the amount 
of $32,974,043 has been produced; silver, $65,316,107; copper, 
$14,793,763; and lead, $14,593,323, the total gross result being 
$127,677,836. The "commercial " value at which the several met- 
als named herein have been estimated is: Silver, 94 cents per 
ounce; copper, 10 cents per pound, and lead, $3 80 per cwt. The 
report also gives a comparative table of the yield of our precious 
metals since 1870. In that year the output from the entire west- 
ern territory, including British Columbia and Mexico, was $54,000,- 
000, and in 1889, $127,677,836. Deducting the product of British 
Columbia and our Southern neighbor, the yield in 1870 was $52,- 
150,000, and in 1889 the figures are $126,723,384. The movement 
of silver is shown by the following: London exported to Japan, 
China, and the Strait Settlements $39,232,314; San Francisco sent 
$18,422,398, making a total of $57,654,712, as against $43,006,618. 
"The returns from Mexico," says the report, "continue to show 
a steady forward movement, in full accord with the healthy pro- 
gress of mineral developments and mining interests in the United 
States." 

* ? i 

THE Comstock market is still heavy, and a serious falling off 
is noticed in the volume of business. Prices are fairly steady, 
which seems strange, in face of the many bear reports afloat. 
Con. Cal. and Virginia ranges between 4} 4.40, with an equally 
limited range in the fluctuations of middle and south end shares. 
The most active stocks on the list are the Tuscaroras. Com- 
monwealth is maintained at 3.80, and all shares offering are qui- 
etly absorbed on the advance. Belle Isle and Nevada Queen are 
also firmer and in better demand. The annual elections of Silver 
King and Sierra Nevada took place during the week. In the lat- 
ter the old officers were re-elected, but a few changes took place 
in the directory of the Arizona mine. The Exchequer and New 
York assessments were delinquent during the week. Silver King 
has been assessed thirty cents per share. 

Ill 

pOL. WM. J. SUTHERLAND arrived in town during the week, 
\j accompanied by C. W. Hulse, of London, and J. H. Bush, of 
Denver. The party had quite an experience in Nevada while re- 
turning from a visit of inspection to their property at Candelaria, 
The special train run for their accommodation got snowed in, 
and the balance of the trip had to be made on sleighs. Col. 
Sutherland will remain on the Coast for a few weeks. 

I I I 

THE statement of the Bank of California, which appears in 
another column of this issue, shows the rapidly increasing 
business of this prosperous institution. The assets amount to 
$13,816,667.42, represented by real estate and loans on stocks, 
bonds and warrants. The reserve fund is now $1,000,000. The 
cash on hand on the 31st day of December, 1889, was $1,180,- 
386.82. 

i I % 

THE Homer Consolidated Company has been blotted out of ex- 
istence by srder of a London Court. The management was 
closed out for the non-payment of a paltry debt of $250. 
I I * 

EXPERTS are about to re-examine the Holmes mine in the in- 
terest of the Candelaria Mill and Mining Company, which 
contemplates purchasing the property. 

I I I 

PROFESSOR PRICE, has been appointed by President Harrison 
one of the Mint Commissioners, to meet at Philadelphia on 
the 15th proximo. 

Ill 

S. P. Warren, who is now operating the Columbus Consolidated 
Mine, of Nevada, has registered at the Palace. 



ANEW electric train-brake was recently tried at Birmingham, 
England. It is said that an entire train fitted with this brake is 
being constructed for vise in Russia. The electric brake works 
upon the inside face of the wheels, or rather upon an iron disc 
fitted to it. The disc or annular ring is a large plate of iron, of 
considerable thickness and several inches in depth, and is Secure- 
ly bolted to the inner side of the w r heel. Opposite this ring is an- 
other, which encircles the axle loosely, and is fixed by stayes in 
such a manner that it cannot revolve with the wheel, but can be 
moved laterally so as to come into contact with or recede from 
the ring attached to the wheel. It is attached to a powerful mag- 
netic coil, and constitutes a large electro magnet. When the elec- 
tric current is applied to it, it is powerfully attracted to the plate 
on the wheel, with the effect of arresting its revolution, and so 
acting as a brake. 



Jan. H. 189 I 



AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



IB 




'Heir tlicCrier!" "Wh«l the devil art thou"" 
■One that will plar the devil, sir, with TOO." 



MB Calvin Brown his sued the New City Hall Commissioners 
for *!.!' 00 (or his written opinion as to the merits of the plans 
of tne architect lor the main tower and foundations for the Mc- 
Allister Street winga of a noble ruin. The Commissioners con- 
si. lered the vote of thanks they gave Mr. Brown ample compensa- 
tion for his opinion. Other engineers who had been consulted 
I lUsfied with it. Why not Mr. Brown'.' But Mr. B. does 
not believe in jawbone currency, hence his suit. He declares 
that he had never known he was to render those services as a 
public-spijited citizen. There is a lot of sound logic in Mr. Brown's 
argument. Public-spirited citizens exist only in the imagination 
of frothy orators, parsons presiding at funerals, and newspaper 
editors boosting a political candidate. The private-spirited citi- 
zen is the man of the day. And he is likewise the philosopher. 
To bim the public is a thing which tramps upon grass plots, de- 
faces walls, and cuts its name on benches. It is a wild, uncon- 
trollable monster which breaks windows, pulls down signs, cheers 
or hoots at meetings, pets pugilists, raves over ballet dancers, and 
is systematically plundered by theatrical managers. This wise 
person takes no stock in it, but looks closely after his own inter- 
ests, well knowing that if any advantage is to be gained from the 
public, it can be done only by complete and supreme independ- 
ence. Possibly sucb ideas possessed the soul of Mr. Brown when 
he disclaimed public spirit, and considered $1,900 worth a great deal 
more than a vote of thanks, long enough to encircle the globe. 

COLONEL PERRIE KEWEN has gone in heavily for boxing, 
and now 
The Sacramento maiden stands peering through her lattice, 

As a stalwart man. in a " sweater " goes by, 
And her pulses thrub, as she whispers '• That is 

Perrie Kewen, the dauntless, with fire in his eye." 
AVhen he leads from the shoulder, 
Each charmed beholder, 
Swears that Perrie the " big 'un " himself might defy. 
Though a little in flesh now by running and sweating, 

And tumbling, and swimming, and punching the bag, 
And knocking the tennis ball over the netting, 

And waltzing for hours with Kate, Phoebe or Mag, 
He'll come to his fighting weight, 
Murphy and Weir he'll slate. 
And leave Jackson, the giant, as limp as a rag. 

THE Austrian entrepreneur who is in correspondence with the 
nobility of Europe anent matrimonial investments endeavors 
to treat the whole matter as a joke. But it is no joke on either 
side. It would be folly to say that there are not lots of wealthy 
girls — aye, and widows, too — here who would gladly take a good- 
looking young man with a title, and endow him with their worldly 
goods. The cold, business-like character of the trade would be 
objectionable to tbem, but this could be glossed over easily, and 
a bucket of mock sentiment thrown in to gloss over the brutality. 
Nor are the women to blame. They see everywhere how rank is 
worshiped, and they are forced to consider that next to money it 
is the best thing to live for. If money will purchase rank — and 
it will, from a knight to a duke — why the deuce should the dear 
creatures be censured for investing in a coronet? It is a pity the 
Austrian's game was blocked so early. Had it gone straight we 
might have colonized the State with German nobility. 

THE small boy is getting ahead of the country. A little urchin 
was seated on a door-step on Merchant street, one day this 
week, mournful-looking and with an unpleasantly moist nose, 
which, though a sign of perfect health in a dog, is not agreeable 
in a small boy. A large pile of peanut shucks and a few shrimp- 
heads told the tale of shameful dissipation. A stranger ap- 
proached this abandoned youth, full of the milk of human kind- 
ness, and patted him on the back in a fatherly manner. The 
little darling looked up, his clear blue childish eyes shone like two 
lucifer matches on a dark night. With a sweet, but half startled 
smile, he inquired, " What the h — lido you want?" I am glad 
to say that the philanthropist's reply was a box in the ear which 
sent the youth flying up the street. 

ME. PICKERING (may his years be long in the land) affects, 
like all great men, a forgetfulness of faces. One day this 
week he met Judge Coffey in a street car, and bowed graciously 
to His Honor. " You are one of the Call contributors, are you 
not?" said the good old gentleman, peering over his glasses at the 
Judge. " I have written for the press," replied Judge Coffey, 
modestly. " I thought so," said Mr. Pickering. " Now, when 
you feel like contributing again, just do something for the Call. 
Where are you now?" " I am engaged in the Blythe case," said 
the Judge. " Ah, reporting it, I suppose," said Mr. Pickering, 
blandly, and as Judge Coffey stepped out, the editor found it im- 
possible to understand the laughter that succeeded his departure. 



WJ 



HKN y.Mi sneeze, and you wheeze, 

And you bark till your eyea 

Bulge out of your head, a la startling surprise; 

When your vertebra Peels 

As if dozens of eels 

Were crawling and twisting, 

And never desisting. 

When your poor addled head 

Feels as heavy as lead, 

And your weary, sad bones 

Feel tilled up with stones, 

As if they were hollow, 

And you can't speak or swallow. 
Then lock up your desk, to your warm bed skip, 
For you've captured la grippe, you've captured la grippe. 

AVERY commendable spirit of independence is developing 
among the ladies of this city. They are not afraid of going 
to the theatres without an escort, and they now feel that because 
they have not a man along they will not be eaten by the ravening 
mob. Again, they have no hesitation in paying their own car ' 
fares and hack hires, and, indeed, are becoming less of the doll in 
every way. Some of them have attained the standard of occa- 
sionally lunching their male friends. This is the true sort of 
women's rights. Besides, it gives them a better idea of the value 
of money than they ever entertained before. When a woman 
has to pay a restaurant bill, wine included, the next time she is 
treated she will have a due regard for the purse of her entertainer. 

BEGGARS are increasing. There is an immense run on the 
blind; they take far better than any other class of cadger. 
A man may lose a leg, or even two, with inconvenience to him- 
self, but without touching the chords of charity in the heart of 
the dime donor. To be a success, a beggar must have collapsed 
optics. These, combined with a fiddle, a quiet-tempered cur and 
a small girl, do the business. An open-mouthed and charitable 
public will come down with its short bits in a way that would 
have made Blind Bartimeus open his eyes, together with the rest 
of the bummers who hung around the gates of the temple of 
Jerusalem. 

THE feeling in Portugal against England is very bitter. — Daily 
Paper. The feeling in Marin county against Portugal is also 
very bitter, because Portugal, as represented by its dairy and 
ranchmen, pitchfork and destroy tons of salmon at the mouths of 
the coast streams. If it could be managed, in an amicable way, 
of course, that Portugal, when in the act of poaching, could 
be pitchforked in a sensitive place, and diplomatically in- 
formed that the punishment would be repeated every time it 
poached, the fish would be unmolested, and the Dagoes 
would be able to sit down without inconvenience. 

IT is well-known to the friends of Mr. Moses Hopkins, that since 
that unfortunate breach of promise suit, he has become vio- 
lently attached to the flute, and that bis instrument is of virgin 
gold. Mr. Hopkins enjoys visiting the interior towns, and at a re- 
cent entertainment at To males a certain mysterious professor ap- 
peared, who, according to the local paper, can imitate the sawing 
of wood, a planing mill, a Nebraska blizzard, a locomotive in mo- 
tion, and various other things with his voice and violin. This 
must have been Mr. Hopkins, whose gold flute dazzled the eyes 
of the good people of Tomales. 

THE scandal market is ever kept well supplied from the other 
side of the water, though heaven knows we do not often run 
short of that article on this. The latest is a wordy scrap between 
Inspector Byrnes and the Claflin sisters. This promises to be 
highly interesting — not alone to the general public,' but to the 
gentlemen who have the honor to call those beautiful dames their 
wives. Mr. Byrnes designates one of the husbands as a " dodder- 
ing old imbecile," but has so far reserved his professional diagno- 
sis of the other. It looks from this rumble of thunder that the 
Claflin sisters were paving the route for a lecture tour. 

EDITOR CHOYNSKI testified that Tom Blythe's wines and 
cigars were not as good as they ought to be. Mr. Choynski 
is a connoisseur, and his evidence confirms the painful fact that 
our millionaires are not, as a rule, judges of good wines and to- 
baccoes. Even Asa Fisk, open handed voluptuary that he 
is at those magnificent entertainments for which he is so cele- 
brated, furnishes but too often cigars of an unmistakable oriental 
character, and champagne which would blush in the presence of 
honest cider- 

MRS. WOODWORTH, and the pale apostle who works the re- 
vival racket with her, should have been drummed out of 
Oakland long ago. True, that village can boast of more male 
and female sinners in proportion to its population than any set- 
tlement on the continent, but hurling them into insanity is not 
the way to convert them. In cases of this sort the abolition of 
the old fashioned ducking school is to be regretted. Mrs. W. and 
her associate cheek by jowl in the stool on a trip to find McGinty, 
would be an edifying spectacle. 

MAJOR BLAKENEY is investigating the life-saving station. 
The mule which pulled the leaky boat up the hill will be an 
important witness. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 18, 1890. 




5UNBEAM5 




MRS. Leland Stanford, of San Francisco, says that her husband 
has six college graduates as car conductors on one line in that 
city. A college graduate ought to be able to call out the names of the 
streets in a inure distinct and cultured tone than the car conductor, 
whose education has been neglected, but the probabilities are that he 
doesn't. — Nbrristown Herald. 

— A " society " writer says that "it is the unwritten law that a 
wedding should never be postponed — not even by a funeral." If one 
of the parties whose wedding has been announced furnishes the sub- 
ject for the funeral, we should think it would look better to postpone 
the marriageceremony—out of respect to the one that is left, etiquette 
or no etiquette. — Norristown Herald. 

-^— Indignant Physician — Man, what have you done? You sent ray 
patient the wrong prescription and it killed hiru. Druggist — Veil, vat 
vas der matter init you? Last veek I send your odder patient der 
righd berscription, and dot killed hira. How can somebody blease 
souch a man? — Springfield Republican. 

Charitable Visitor— I belong to the Motto Mission, and I hear 

you are a hard-working, patient, deserving widow and that your 
children sometimes go without meals. I have brought you one of our 
prettiest devices to hang on your wall to comfort you in your gloomy 
moments. 

Servant— Please, ma'am, there's a lot of steak left over from din- 
ner; will I put it away and make a hash of it to-morrow or the next 
day? Literary Housewife — No; don't bother about it: throw it in the 
soap grease. And she proceeds to finish her article entitled. " Econ- 
omy in the Kitchen. —Boston Budget. 
■ The mildest nature will rebel. 
. The very meekest man will spar, 
When some deceiver seeks to sell 
Him on a two-for-five cigar. 

— Washington Capital. 

Mamma — Well, Willie, what good resolve are you going to make 

for the new year? Willie — I won't fight with Johnny any more. 
Mamma— Vm very glad my little son sees how wrong and sinful it is 
to fight. Willie — Yes'm. He always licks me. — Munsey*s Weekly. 

A.— I saw your mother-in-law at the theatre last night She 

seemed to enjoy herself very much. She laughed herself half to death. 
B. — Yes, that's just like her. She always does things by halves. She 
is a very unsatisfactory sort of a woman. — Fliegende Blatter. 

The two American girls who are trying to make the trip around 

the world in 74 days may accomplish the feat, but the fact that La 
Grippe got more than half around the world in one week will rob 
their achievement of much of its glory. 

Mr. W.— The idea of a man coming to the theatre in such an in- 
toxicated condition. I'll have the usher remove him. Mrn. W. — Let 
him alone, John ; I think he is very considerate. He got all he wanted 
before he came in, and will uot be likely to annoy people by going out 
between the acts. — Life. 

There are two things in this world about which the average 

woman seems to be eternally in doubt. One is whether her hat is on 
straight, and the other is just how much her husband loves her. 

— Somerville Journal. 

Maud — And so you are going to marry Charley Demare? It was 

only a month ago that I heard you say you positively hated him. 
Belle— -Yes, I know, but that was when he was going with that horrid 
Jenkins girl. — Kearny Enter-prise. 

'■ I hear your husband has been out shooting. Did he have any 

luck?" asked Mrs. Fitzroy of Mrs. Shiftless. "Oh, yes; he had luck", 
if you please to call it so. He saved two fingers of his ri ght. hand." 

— Hartford Post. 

It is estimated that " Uncle Sam is worth $61,459,000,000." It 

must afford much consolation to the tattered and penniless tramp to 
know that he is one of Uncle Sam's children. 

Wife— I see by this paper that Bismarck believes in bald-headed 

men. Husband— I wonder why? Wife — Well, it must be because 
bald-headed men always go to the front. —N. Y. Morning Journal. 

" Cigarettes for ladies," sold in London, are perfumed with 

musk and violet. Man hasn't a constitution strong enought to smoke 
. a cigarette perfumed with musk. — Norristovm Herald. 

Ignorant Maiden— Mr. Marshare must be a model husband. 

" Why so? " " He is so attentive to other women, you know, he must 
be a perfect slave to his wife." — Boston Transcript. 

What! is the Widow Brown going to be led to the altar for the 

third time?" " No, I guess not. She ought to be able to find her way 
there herself by this time." —Fliegende Blatter. 

Mr. E. Viewer— This new book I brought home is the veriest 

trash. I don't like to put it in the library. Mrs. Hewer— Then, let 
us give it to some one for a birthday present. — Puck. 

A bankrupt banker had just made out his schedule of assets. 

•" But what will you say when you meet your creditors?" asked a 
friend. " Oh, I shan't meet them; they travel on foot, while I always 
take a cab." —Judge. 

" Well, Mrs. McGinty.an' pbat did the ould man beafthergiv- 

in' yez for Christinas?" " Luk at that black eye an' don't be askin' 
me questions ! " — Life. 

-He— I don't see why there should be no marriage or giving in 

marriage in Heaven. She— Probablv because there won't be any men 
there. 

Experience is a great teacher, but the little tin utensil we use 

to rub nutmegs on is a grater. 



NEXT.— Brooklyn Eagle. 

If the German band would cease its moans, 

How thankful we should be; 
If the butcher would not weigh the bones. 

How thankful we should be; 
If the truckman didn't own the street, 
If the funny man could not repeat, 
If the office-boy would raise his feet, 
How thankful we should be. 



THE deliberations of the anti-slavery conference recently held at 
Brussels indicate the intention to establish an organization 
for the placing of cruisers on the interior waters of the country 
contiguous to the slave centers of traffic, for the more prompt and 
decisive suppression of the slave trade, and prohibiting the im- 
portation of fire-arms and ammunition in the slave trade terri- 
tories. In the proposals of the Belgian Plenipotentiaries the sta- 
tions and cruisers are designed to initiate the natives in the 
methods of agriculture and the means of defense respectively. 

I^STSTTIR-A-ILiTCIE]- 



CAPITAL. 




Insurance Company. 

$1 .000,000, | ASSETS $2,360,000. 



D. J. STAPLES, President. 
ALPHEUS IjULL, Vice President. 



I WILLIAM J. DUTTON, Secretary. 
| B. EAYMONVILLE, Ass't Secretary. 



Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United States. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 18710 

fibb _A_i>r:D nyc-A-ZRiicrrE.. 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up J400.000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 278 AND 220 iANSOME STREET, 

San Francisco, California. 

GEORGE L. BRANDER, CHAS. H. CU8HING, P. J. WHITE, 

President. Secretary. Vice-President. 

Board of Directobs— D. Callaghao, P. J. White, J. M. Donahue, GEO. 

L. Brauder, E. L. Goldstein, L. Cunningham, M. Kane, Fisher Ames, Dr. 

C. F. Buckley, Dr. Wm. Jones, G. H. Wheaton, T. McMulliu, H. H. Watson, 

H. Dimond, P. Bo le 

THE SOUTH BRITISH 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. 

capital j10.000.u00. 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

Office— 412 California Street, San Francisco. 

A. S. MURRAY, Manager. 
SAN FRANCISCO CITY DEPARTMENT: 
CONRAD & MAXWELL, Agent 

421 California Street. 

CALIFORNIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Organized February, I86I. 

CashCapital I 600,000 00 

Assets 1,300,000 00 

Net Surplus as regards Policyholders 820,000 00 

Losses Paid 3,500,000 00 

CITY DEPARTMENT: 

A. C. DONNELL, Manager, 

378 California Street, S. F. 

Department of the Pacific States and Territories. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL $10,000,000. | CASH ASSETS IN U. S ...$746,186.00 

SCOTTISH UNION AND NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

CAPITAL $30,000,000 | CASH ASSETS $16,407,072.46 

420 California Street, San Francisco, Cat. 
W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL $5,000,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 California Street. San Francisco. 

AGGREGATE ASSETS, $46,000,000- 

London Assurance Corporation of London [Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.1 
Northern Assurance Company of London [Established 1836. ' 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1867.] 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 
S. E. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets. Safe Deposit Building. 



Jan 



SAN Ki: WCISCO NEWS LETTER. 




-\ . 



J-\-' 



Y-y/;//r/r/a'//s^FM 



HN-STTR-A-nSTCIE. 



TUB remarkable geological phenomenon of the moving Mono of 
Bueooa Ay res la situated on the mountain of Tamlil in the 
southern part of the province of Buenos Ayres. It is called the 
moving stone, and i* famous throughout South America. This 
enormous rock appears t-> be sustained on its base by an invisi- 
ble ajcla, and has an oscillating movement from east to west to 
and from the mountain, the power of a single man being sufficient 
to put it in motion. It measures -1 feet in bight, DO feet in 
length, and 18 feet En breadth. It represents a volume of over 
5,000 cubic feet) and its approximate weight, as calculated, is 26 
tons. Its figure is that of an irregular cone, ami the base on 
which it rests has also the form of a cone which has a diameter 
of about ten inches. When the wind blows from the southeast 
the movable stone sways, rises, and falls after the manner of the 
branch of a great tree. — La Ilustracion Espanola. 

Dr. Schlunk's discovery that the fats in cocoa-nut oil make a 

very satisfactory substitute for butter seems to be the beginning 
of a new and important industry. Already at Mannheim a large 
factory has been established which produces daily about 3,000 
kilograms of the new butter substitute, which is retailed at a price 
equivalent to Gd. or Sd. per lb. The nuts are obtained from the 
South Sea and Coral Islands, and also from Africa, Arabia, and 
South America. The new butter is of a clear whitish color, and 
melts at 2T : C. : it contains 90.99 per cent, of fats, with only a 
trace of mineral constituents. It is neither disagreeable to the 
taste nor smell, and is being rapidly introduced into hospitals and 
other State institutions, as well as into houses or homes where 
people are too poor to buy butter. The working classes are tak- 
ing to it, instead of the oleo-margarines, which are often made 
from very inferior qualities of refuse fat. — Industries. 

The Electric Industry Magazine says "in the United States 

and Canada 645$ miles of street railways are operated slectrically, 
using 1,280 cars (motor and trailing) the details of which appear 
in our directory of electric railways. The following summary, 
showing the extent of electric railways in each State and in Cana- 
ada, indicates that Ohio has the greatest number of miles of elec- 
tric railways, while Pennsylvania, with only one-third of Ohio's 
electric railway tracks, has the greatest number of cars propelled 
by electricity. New York State stands next to Ohio in total 
length of roads as well as number of cars. Massachusetts comes 
next with 76£ miles and 118 cars; in a short time, however, 'Bos- 
ton's extensive electric railway system will place the Old Bay 
State far ahead of all others. 

The following remedy is said to be the best known, at 

least it is worth trying, for physicians seem powerless to cope 
with the disease successfully. At the first indication of diph- 
theria in the throat of a child make the room close; then take a tin 
cup and pour into it a quantity of tar and turpentine, equal parts. 
Then hold the cup over a fire so as to fill the room with fumes. 
The little patient, on inhaling the fumes, will cough up and spit 
out all the membranous matter, and the diptheria will pass off. 
The fumes of the tar and turpentine loosen the matter in the 
throat, and thus afford the relief that has baffled the skill of phy- 
sicians. 

Two members of the Vienna Military Veterinary Institute 

have introduced an improvement in the use of the laryngeal mir- 
ror for horses. The ordinary mirror, which at its outer end, has an 
incandescent electric light, is introduced into the nostril, and at 
once makes visible any symptoms of nasal mucus and other dis- 
eases which call for the prompt isolation of the animal. The op- 
eration has proved possible even in the case of obstinate horses, 
and a quiet animal will submit to it without resistance. 

— Electrician. 

A new insulated material for electric conductors has been 

brought out in Germany. It consists of paper which has been 
thoroughly soaked in an ammoniacal copper solution. The pasty 
mass is then pressed against the conducting wires to be covered 
by means of rollers, and the whole is passed through a bath of 
boiling linseed oil, being left in it until the covering is saturated. 
This makes it elastic and impermeable to moisture. 

— Electrician. 

Colonel B. C. Barkley, of Charleston, S. C, says that the 

curlews and seagulls on that coast eat more clams than the entire 
population of the city. They pick them up, carry them into the 
air, drop them on the rocks and break them open, then swoop 
down and feast upon them. 

Thirty-seven millions of passengers is the reported number 

that crossed the great suspension bridge between New York and 
Brooklyn for the year ending December 1, 1889. 

Poison-oak cured by Steele's Grindelia Lotion. Twenty years 'experience 
has proved this remedy to be & specific. Apply immediately after returning 
from a picnic excursion, aud the dread eruption will be prevented. James 
G. Steele & Co. .635 Market street. 



FIRE. 



ZM^iRinsriE. 



The Largsst Assets of any Company West of New York State. 
Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation 

OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
OJHcc, 316 Montgomery Slrecl un«l 410 Pine Street. 

CAPITAL (Fully Paid) |2,000,000 

ASSETS 2,672,849 



LOUIS SLOSS. . 
\VM. MACHONALD 



President I Z. P. CLARK Secretary 

Vice President | J. B. LEVISON. . Muriuc Secretary 



Exhibit October 1st, 1889. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

276* Sanso.ne Street 

Losses p'd since orgaui'n. $3,011, r-25.77 I Reinsurance Reserve $ 255,052.20 

Assets October 1, l»»y . 815,748.87 Capital paid up, Gold . . - 300,000 00 

Surplus for policy holders 801,954.83 | 

Net Surplus, over capital aud all liabilities, October 1, 1887. . . 246,902.62 

Fire Losses paid in 1>S9. $159,086.70 

Fire Losses unpaid October 1, 1889 11,794.04 

President J. F. HOUGHTON I Secretary CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-President. ... J. L. N. SHEPAKD | General Agent . . R. H. MAGILL 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANYIfIaLIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL, Paid in Full $ 200.000.00 

ASSETS. December 3 1. 1888 460.086.70 

LOSSES Paid Since Organization 2,1 01 ,032.71 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 
Chas. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(Safe Deposit Building). San Francisco, Cal. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF HAMBURG. 

Capital $1,500,000.00 

Net surplus 408,400.27 

Assets January 1, 1889 1,311,809.84 

Invested in U. S 518,352.96 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 
232 California Street, - - San Francisco, Cat. 

tffF' General Agents for the United States and Territories west of the 
Rocky Moun tains. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited] 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester*. 

Capital Subscribe!/ $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Reserve Fund (in addition to Capital) 2,125,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 8, 124,057.80 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street, San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. BALOISE of Basle— Capital 5,000,000 Francs. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
street. San Fraucisno. ^^ 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $9,260,000 

Cash Assets 2,764,876 

Cash Assets In United States 1,398,646 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS, 

316 Caiifornia Street, San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782.] 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Esfab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & HALBAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacifie Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco. 

NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS PORT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Board. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. 

Monev advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates in first-class Companies, or Grain sold, if 
desired, at current rates. 

Office of the Company, 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-California Bank. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 18, 1810. 



^LB^Il 



THERE are several important auction sales set for the next two 
weeks, which are sure to add a little excitement to a market 
otherwise in a rather quiet condition. Of course the promoters 
are taking chances on the weather, which is more unreliable than 
ever, the rain holding its own again almost uninterruptedly during 
the week. Accordingly, business, which was just getting active 
and most promising, lost its headway once more, and again every 
body is wishing and waiting for the day when the glorious 
climate shall settle down upon them permanently for the season. 
The weather interferes principally with the small business, the 
sales of cheap residence properties, upon which all houses have 
lately been counting quite heavily. 

The excitement concerning the transactions in property north 
of Market and east of Montgomery street has been calming 
down considerably since it has become generally understood that 
the purchases were all made for the account of one investor. His 
latest purchase is said to be that of 67:6x177 :6 with an L of 20x70 
on the west side of Battery street, between Broadway and Pacific 
for $41,000. There are, however, many others ready and willing 
to invest in the same locality who are kept off by the sudden ad- 
vance which has been made in the prices asked. Should the lat- 
ter be moderated somewhat, quite a long line of sales is bound to 
result. It is, however, generally conceded that a permanent 
advance of from fifteen to twenty-five per cent over the values 
ruling last summer will remain. 

Another neighborhood which has been absorbing some quiet 
attention of late is the higher lying portion of Cow Hollow, be- 
tween the Presidio and Black Point. The military authorities 
have undertaken the improvement of Lombard street, the city 
having sewered it, for the purpose of getting a good road to Black 
Point. As a consequence, considerable speculation has resulted, 
and property values have gone up. Whether the movement will 
be sustained is another question. The Union street cable road 
was once supposed to have given the district a start, but instead 
of doing so, the district has not enabled the road to run at a profit. 
The dividends to shareholders on this line are said to be exceed- 
ingly small and far between. Notwithstanding this, however, 
real estate is selling well here just now. Among these sales are: 
137:6x137:6 on the southeast corner of Union and Broderick 
streets, $10,000; 105x167 on the southwest corner of Gough and 
Lombard streets; 105x137:6 on the northwest corner of Gough 
and Lombard streets; 120x137:6 on the southeast corner of Fill- 
more and Lombard streets; 137:6x137:6 on the northwest corner 
of Webster and Lombard streets; 137:6x137:6 on the southeast 
corner of Bay and Fillmore streets, and block 240, bounded by 
Chestnut, Steiner, Fillmore and Lombard streets; also, 275x108:2 
on the southwest corner of Greenwich and Broderick streets, and 
137:6x202:9 on the southwest corner of Filbert and Broderick 
streets, the price paid for the two last named being $25,000. A 
little farther to the south and up on the hill, on the north side of 
Vallejo street, between Fillmore and Webster, three fifty-vara 
lots sold for $65,000. They, however, are not Cow Hollow property. 

There has not been much done in other localities. In outside 
lands there was a sale of about one-third of block 206, on Clement 
street and Twenty-fifth avenue, for $8,600; also of block 761, 
south of the Park, for $34,650. 

In the Mission sales were made of 50x100 with an L of 25x80, 
on the west side of Valencia street, 150 feet north of Nineteenth, 
being the property conditionally sold at auction some time ago. 

South of Market street there was a sale of 49:6x75 on the west 
corner of Folaom and Beale streets. 

On the south side of Turk street, 57 :6 feet east of Jones, 80 feet 
frontage by 137:6 feet in depth, also changed, owners. 

The promoters of the Pine street railroad have petitioned the 
■Board of Supervisors to be allowed to surrender their grant. The 
_ right was accorded them, in the first place, over the veto of the 
Mayor, and it was at the time quite well understood that its be- 
stowal was a political favor. The grantees were politicians, who 
undoubtedly never intended to build. But they thought the fran- 
chise valuable, perhaps for another purpose; as, for instance, for 
the purposes of a sale to any road, with which the new road if built 
would come in competition. But no other road seems ever to 
have arrived at that way of thinking, nor to have expressed any 
desire to purchase the right, so that now, when the franchise 
holders find themselves burdened with the expense of keeping up 
the pavements within the boundaries of the grant, they are quite 
willing to surrender it to the city. Whether the surrender should 
be accepted is another matter. The contract having been made, 
it should not be lightly set aside. The franchise grabbers got only 
what they themselves asked for, and if there is any way of mak- 
ing them keep the conditions of their grant, they should be used 
to make them toe the mark. There is considerable street work 
projected along this proposed road, and if Messrs. Clunie, Ames, 
O'Connor et al can be made to bear their proper share thereof, as 
the owners of the franchise, it would be very unjust to the prop- 
erty owners to relieve them from it. 




THE COMPLETE CODE. 



Caligraph Type Writer. 

Most Rapid and Latest Improved, 

Writing Machine Supplies. 
THE SAMUEL HILL COMPANY, 

Geueral Agents, 
29 Sew Montgomery Street 

San Francis co. 

K. 



For the use of Agents, Bankers, Brokers, Shippers, etc., etc., and the tele- 
graphing public. 



By W. 



S U T H E R LA N D. 



Published by EYRE AND SPOTTHWOODE, Her Majesty's Printers 
Loudou, E. C; aud E. & J. B. YOUNG & CO., Cooper Uniou, New York. 
Paris Agency— ■' Journal des Mines," 26 Rue Cambou. 

10 Draper's Gardens, E, C. 
Dear Sir: The " K. K. Code " is the best I have ever used. 

Faithfully yours, F. B. Behr. 

DUTTON & PARTRIDGE, 

214 California St., S. F., 

Agents for Pacific Cvasf. 

Joshua Hendy Machine Works, 

Nos. 39 to 51 FREMONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

HYDRAULIC MINING, QUARTZ AND SAWMILL MACHINERY, 
AUTOMATIC ORE FEEDERS, "TRIUMPH" 

ORE CONCENTRATORS, HYDRAULIC GRAVEL ELEVATORS 
HYDRAULIC GIANTS. 

AGENTS FOR THE SALE OF 

'CUMMER" AUTOMATIC ENGINES, 

PORTER M'F'G CO.'S ENGINES AND BOILERS, 
"BAKER" ROTARY PRESSURE BLOWERS, 

"CLIMAX" BAND SAW-MILLS, from Cincinnati Ohio, 
"WILBRAHAM" ROTARY PISTON PUMPS, 

"BOGGS & CLARKE" CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS, 

P. BLAISDELL & CO.'S MACHINISTS' TOOLS. 



PARKE & LACY CO., " 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IRON WORKING MACHINERY. 

ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING. OILS AND SUPPLIES. 

A. LUSK & CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Packers of the following celebrated brands: 

k. LUSK BEAR BRAND, 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY, 

SAN LORENZO PACKING CO 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

A. Q,"CriTi3T HOME, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 



WlSfjeclTic 

A-** LIGHT 

JTXTURES 

*OTOT DIRECT FROMTHE 
^ANUFACTUF\Er\S 

THOMAS DAY &CCUTD. 



^ 




SAN FRANCISCO 0AL 



Lt : <*». 



>\\ FB V.NCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



1!) 



THE BOURSE AND UNDERWRITER 

\ 8r&BR, January 18, II 

ONLY ihrrr ol lb a hn-al Insurftfto* oompanlea have yet filed 
ihnr ■tatementi with Commissioner Vv**d!s worth. These 
•rc the Flreman*s Fund, the Anglo-Nevada and the I nion. The 
the only one thai better than it commenced the 

yesr-.-the others have lost mouey. The Anglo's snrplaa has been 
reduced to $75,000, while the Dnton has preserved itself From im- 
pairment by sacrificing it? surplus. The latter company's report 
however, that with this exception it is as strong and boI- 
vent as it ever was. The Fireman's Fund has beaten its last 
year's income by $101,043. The total premium receipts were 
$1,876,904, <»f this Mini the lire premiums amount tu $1,106,852, 
against $0$f»,.S7d in 1SSS. The marine premiums were $170,052, 
against $188,691 of the previous year. The company's gross 
• ire $2,431,000, against m'.::i 7. mm in 1888, an increase of 
$114,000. The sum of $4,622 has been added to the surplus, 
bringing it up to $484,000. The Anglo-Nevada has written most 
conservatively during the year, exercising great care in accepting 
risks. Considering the terrific series of losses along the coast, 
this company has come out very well indeed. It is the youngest 
of our locals, and for its age it has done wonders. The total in- 
come aggregated $1,017,073, of which the Coast income was 
$346,005. The Coast losses were $25,397, in the ratio of 72.94 to 
the income. The total losses were $638,321, or C4.8. The Anglo's 
assets are now $2,509,553, the largest of any company west of 
Chicago. The sum of $90,000 was paid in dividends. The sur- 
plus is now $75,000. 

The Unions total income was $S83,530, of which $719,245 was 
divided for fire premiums, and $95,999 for marine. The losses 
were very heavy, being $518,058 for fire and $70,344 for marine. 
The total expenditures were $955,556. In California, the Union 
did an excellent business, its loss ratio being 30.4 by the lowest 
among the locals. This Company's assets are now $1,272,186. If 
the conditions during the coming year at all approach the normal 
the Union ought to make up for its losses, as the Company en- 
joys an excellent business. The California has not been much 
more fortunate than its competitors, and when this reliable and 
excellently managed company does not make money, the assump- 
tion that the times are out of joint is pretty safe. The California 
enjoys a reputation for conservatism and square dealing second 
to no other Company in the country. Its total income was $758,- 
309, of which $532,042 was derived for fire premiums, and $173,- 
372 for marine. The total fire losses were $390,502, and marine 
$145,031. Within the State the Californias income was $192,916, 
and the losses were $59,664, in the ratio of 41.9. The assets are 
$1,247,874, and its surplus over all liabilities are $137,454. 

So far as California is concerned, the business of the various 
companies has been excellent. The total premium receipts for all 
companies were $6,158,754, and the losses $2,572,001, the ratio 
being 41.7. The locals wrote $92,456,111 of business, against $87,- 
446,368 in 1888. The premiums were $1,593,702, against $1,472,- 
306. The foreign companies wrote $142,903,937, against $148,976,- 
869, with premiums $2,457,339, against $2,499,770 last year. The 
losses were $1,018,775, the ratio being 41.4, against 51.5 in 1888. 
The other State companies wrote $116,819,475, with premiums 
$2,107,712 and losses $940,140. The corresponding totals last year 
were $116,408,549, $2,114,964, $1,089,458. The ratios are: 1889, 
44.1; 1888, 51.5. 

The Liverpool and London and Globe as usual leads in Cali- 
fornia business with a premium income of $278,908. Among the 
foreign companies the Commercial Union follows with $180,933. 
The three locals, Fireman's Fund, $272,088, Anglo-Nevada, $246,- 
006, Home Mutual, $230,833, follow in due order. The Phoenix 
of New York appears to be the most popular after these, its in- 
come being $212,796. These figures are all in advance of those of 
last year. Of course the above are purely local results. When 
the Coast figures and all the companies are available it will be 
possible to determine the figures and how the various companies 
have come out. This will include the Seattle and Spokane Falls 
conflagrations, etc. It will then be seen how well the California 
locals have come out in comparison with their larger brethren. 
The loss ratio of the majority of the companies will probably ex- 
ceed ninety per cent, and with the average of about thirty per 
cent, for expenses and commissions, it will be seen that the in- 
comes have been materially exceeded. 

Alfred Stillman has been at San Jose during the week, endeav- 
oring to induce the enterprising " locals " of that neighborhood to 
maintain rates. The condition of affairs is precisely the same as 
at Los Angeles and Oakland, some officers obtaining business by 
payment of excessive commissions, and other companies, content 
to obey the law, suffering. It is understood, however, that the 
majority have signed an agreement, by which they are bound to 
abstain from rate-cutting, and, moreover, to limit commissions to 
fifteen per cent. 

Manager Litchfield, of the Lancashire, has not yet arrived on the 
coast, and it is understood that he, too, is suffering from la grippe. 
The number of candidates for the agency is increasing, and there 
will be a very lively struggle as soon as he puts in an appearance. 
The new firm of Okell, Donnell & Co. are making an active can- 
vass, with a good chance of securing the agency. There are others 



in the field, who are working very quietly, with fair prospects. 

The new Chronicle building bos been rated at 80 cents. It is 
admitted by under u ritera to be fire-proof beyond all doubt. 

Rumor has it that the present month will see a number of 
agencies broken up by the separation of companies deciding to 
do business with new representatives. This character of report 
is always In circulation, though there appears at present mure 
ground than usual for it. Heavy losses are, us a matter of course, 
the cause. Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOilGE. 

People's Home Savings B^nk, 
805 Market Street, corner of Fourth Slree . 
For the half year ending December 31. 1889, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five and fifty-two hundredths (5.52) on term deposits, aud four 
and sixty hundredths (■l.iiO) on ordinary deposits, for the eutire term of de- 
posit, aud free of all taxes, payable on mid after January 2, 1890. 

D. 8. DQKN, Actiug Cashier 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, 
Corner of Powell aud Eddy Streets. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1889, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate offiveaudfifty eight hundredths (5 58 100) percent, per annum on 
Term Deposits, aud four and sixty-five hundredths (4 65 100) per ceut. per 
annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of tax, and payable on and after THURS- 
DAY, January 2, 1890. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

019 Clay Street. 

For tne half year ending December 31, 1883, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five and one-tenth (5 1-10) per cent, per annum, on all deposits, 

free of taxes, and payable on aud after THURSDAY, January 2, 1890. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the p Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 
N. E. Corner Montgomery and Post Sts., 

San Francisco, January 2, 1890. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this Society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of 4V£ per cent, per aunum on 
all deposits for the six months euding December 31, 1889, free from all taxes, 
and pavable from and after this date. 

R. J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company. 

Dividend No. 24 (Thirty Cents per share) of the Hawaiian Commercia 
and Sugar Company, will be payable at the office of the Company, 32T 
Market street, on and after SATURDAY, February 1, 1890. Transfer books 
will close Saturday, January 25th, 1890, at 12 o'clock m. 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hutchinson Sugar Plantation Company. 
Livideud No. 8 {Forty Cents per share) of the Hutchinson Sugar Planta- 
tion Company, will be payable at the oitiee of the Company, 327 Market 
street, <>n aud after MONDAY, January '20th, 1890. Transfer books will 
close Monday, January 13th, 1890, at 3 o'clock p. m. 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

"DTvTDENOdTICEr" ~^~ 

The German Savings and Loan Society, 
526 California Street. 
For the half year ending December 31st, 1889, a dividend has been de- 
clared atthe rate of five and forty hundredths (5 40 100) per cent, per aunum 
on Term Deposits, and four and one-half (4J4) per cent, per annum on Or- 
dinary Deposits, payable on and after Thursdav, January 2, 1890. 

GEO. TOPKN Y Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hakalau Plantation Company. 
Dividend No. 42 (One Dollar per share) of the Hakalau Plantation Com- 
pany is now pavable at the office of the Company, 327 Market street 

E. H. SHELDON. Secretary. 



Hue Table 

WINES 

From our Celebrated 

ORLEANS VINEYARD 




Producers 
of the 



Champagne 




530 WASHINGTON ST. 

San Francisco 



General AgeneisG 

NEW VORK 
PARK k TILFORD, 917 Broad-raj 

PHILADELPHIA 
J. P. DIUEY k CO., 25 S. Tenth Street 

CHICAGO 

0. JEVKE & CO., 110 Madison Street 

ST. PAUL 
C. JEVKE 4 CO., 114 E. Third Street 

DETROIT 

G. k R. McMILt AN, 131 Woodard Avenue 

CINCINNATI 
JOS. R PEEBLES SOUS' CO., Piie's Bldg. 

HONOLULU 
BiffllTOH JOHNSOK 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 18, 1890. 



LLOYD TEV1S. Prbsideht. San Fran0I9OO. 
JNO. J. VALENTINE, ViCB-PRESTOBKT 

AND GEN. MaHAGBR, SAN FRANCISCO. 

JAME8 HERON, Secretary. San Frawoiboo. 

H, B. PAESONS, asst. Secy, New York. 

H. WADSWORTH. Treasurer, San Francisco. 

'OFFICE OF THE 
VlCE-PRES'T AND GEN'L MANAGER. 



Sctt-v cFrcvn.ci-2.co, ©cccrnGct; 31, 1889. 



DEAR Sir : The following is our Annual Report of Precious Metals produced in the States and Territories 
west of the Missouri River (including British Columbia, and receipts by express from the West Coast of Mexico) 
during 1889, which shows in the aggregate: Gold, $32,974,643; Silver, $65,316,107; Copper, $14,793,763; Lead, 
$14,593,323. Total gross result, $127,677,836. The " commercial " value at which the several metals named herein 
have been estimated, is: Silver, 94 cts. per oz.; Copper, 10 cts. per lb.; and Lead, $3.80 per cwt. 

As in former Reports, allowance must be made for probable variations from exact figures, by reason of constantly 
increasing facilities for transporting bullion, ores and base metals from the mines outside of the Express, and the 
difficulty of getting entirely reliable data from private sources. Especially is such the case in the reports from 
Montana and Colorado. Statistics gathered in this way are liable to be exaggerated; but, with some modifications 
on this account, already made, the fiual general results reached may be accepted as approximately correct. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 


Gold Dust and Bul- 
lion by Express. 


Gold Dust and 

Bullion by other 

Conveyances. 


Silver Bullion 
by Express. 


Ores and Base 
Bullion by Freight. 


TOTAL. 




$9,390,044 
3,082,653 

654.659 
112,000 


$939,000 


$ 664,476 

6,352,654 

30,7O2 

85,000 


$1,849,237 
2,473.654 


$12,842,757 

11,908,961 

7SS.36I 

217,000 

845,000 

17,344,600 

31,726,923 

9,830,013 

28,074, 8S8 






100,000 

20,000 

845,000 












3,204,500 

4,500,000 

15.275 

3,534.790 

384.507 

922,S6l 

3.407,177 

4,8l8 

442,164 


7,564,500 

16,076,923 

1,764,762 

19,341,847 

140,325 

611,666 


6,575.600 
11,150,000 
8,049,976 
5.198,251 
3,362,845 
4,218.500 






Utah 










50,000 
50,000 


3.937.677 
5,803,027 

3,407,177 
512,288 
442,164 










507.470 


















Total 


$29,655,448 


$2,004,000 


$53,140,325 


$42,878,063 


$127,677,836 





The gross yield for 1SS9, shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows: 

Gold ' 25^ $32,974,643 

Silver 51^ 65,316,107 

Copper 1 1^ 14.793,763 

Lead ii t «j 14,593.323 



Total $127,677,836 

ANNUAL PRODUCTS OF LEAD, COPPER, SILVER AND GOLD IN THE STATES AND TERRITORIES WEST OF THE MISSOURI RIVER, 1870-1889 



YEAR. 


Production as 
per W. F. it Co's state- 
ments, including: 
amounts from British 
Columbia and West 
Coast of Mexico. 


Product after 
deducting Amounts 

from British 

Columbia and West 

Coast of Mexico. 


The Net Products of the States and Territories west of the Missouri River, exclusive of 
British Columbia and West Coast of Mexico, divided, is as follows : 




LEAD, 


Copper. 


SrLVER. 


Gold. 


1S7O 


$54,000,000 
58,284,000 
62,236,959 
72,258,693 
74,401,045 
8o.SS9,057 
90,875,173 
98,421,754 
81,154,622 
75,349,501 
80,167,936 
84,504,417 
92,411, S35 
90,313,612 

84,975,954 
90,181,260 
103,011,761 
104,645,959 
"4.341,592 
127,677,836 


$52,150,000 
55,784,000 
60,351, S24 
70,139,860 
7.1,965,610 

76,703,433 

87,219,859 

95,811,582 

78,276,167 

72,688,SSS 

77,232,512 

81,198,474 

89,207,549 

84,639,212 

Si, 633,835 

87,311,082 

100,160,222 

103,327,770 

112,665,569 

126,723,384 


$i,oSo,ooo 
2,100,000 
2,250,000 

3,450,000 

3,800,000 
5,100,000 
5,040,000 

5,085,250 
3,452,000 
4,185,769 
5,742,390 

6,361,902 
8,008,155 
8.i63'550 
6,834,091 
8,562,991 

9.185,192 

9,631,073 
11,263,630 

14.S93.323 




$17,320,000 

I9,2S6,000 
19,924,429 
27,483,302 
29,699,122 
31,635,239 
39,292,924 
45,846,109 
37,248,137 
37,032,857 
38,033,055 
42,987,613 

48,133,039 
42,975,101 
43,529,925 
44.516,599 
52,136,851 
50,833,884 

53,152,747 
64,808,637 


$33,750,000 
34,39s, OOO 

38,177,395 
39.206,558 
38,466,488 
39,968,194 

42,886,935 

44,880,223 

37,576,030 
31,470,262 
32,559,067 
30,653,959 

29,011,318 
27,816,640 

25.183,567 
26,393.756 
29,561,424 
32,500,067 
29. 987,702 
32,527,661 


1S7I 




1872 




1S73 




1S74 




1S75 




1876 




1877 




1S78 




IS79 

1SS0 

1SS1 

IS82 
IS83 

I8S4 



ISS6 
ISS7 
ISSS 
ISS9 


$ 898,000 
1,195,000 

4.055.037 
5,683,921 
6,086,252 
7.838,036 

9.276,755 
10,362,746 
18,261,490 
H.793.763 



The exports of Silver during the past year to Japan, China, the Straits, etc., have been as follows: From 
Loudon, $39,232,314; from San Francisco, $18,422,398. Total, $57,654,712, as against $43,006,618 last year. Pounds 
Sterling estimated at S4.84. 



rgg 



9AN Ki; \\< [S( NEWS BETTER. 



21 



^ f 1 1 i I'c b § la I'c s o f 31 1 c x i co. 



StMIMIM UK Till: rRnm r OF BOLD AMI SILVER IN Till: REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, REVISED AND CORRECTED FROM 1877 TO lS&J. 

VALUES UPON MINTAGE BASIS. 



YEARS. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Total. 


IS---i8j3 


$747,000 

SSi.ooo 

942,000 

1,013,000 

937,000 

956,000 

1,055,000 

914,000 

1,026,000 

1,047,000 

1,031,000 

1,040,000 

$11,589,000 


$24,837,000 
25,125,000 
26,800,000 
29,234,000 
29,329,000 
29,569,000 
31,695,000 
33,226,000 
34,112,000 
34,600,000 
34,912,000 
40,706,000 


$25,584,000 


iS-S-.Ji-g 


1 880 


27,742,000 
30,247,000 
30,266,000 
30,525,000 
32,750,000 
34, 140,000 
35,138,000 
35,647,000 
35,943,000 
41,746,000 


S8l 


1SS1 : v 


I S83 


[883-1884 


[8S4-I885 


I8S5-ISS6 


ISS6-1SS7 

-1SS8 


1SSS-1SS9 




Total 


$374,145,000 


$385,734,000 





EXHIBIT OF COINAGE OF GOLD, SILVER AND COPPER, IN THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, FROM THE 1ST OF JULY, 1873, 

TO THE 30TH OF JUNE, 1889. 



1S73-1S74.. 

1874-1875.. 

1S75-1S76.. 
1876-1S77.. 
1877-1S78.. 
1S78-1S79.. 
1S79-1SS0. . 
1SS0-1SS1.. 
1SS1-1S82 . 
• 1S82-1SS3.. 
1883-1884... 
18S4-1S85 . . 
1885-18S6.. 
1SS6-1SS7.. 
18S7-1888.. 
1S88-1889 . . 

Total 



Gold Dollars. 



S66.743 
862,619 
809,401 
695.750 
691,998 
658,206 
521, S26 
492,068 

452,590 
407,600 
328,69s 
423,250 
425,000 
410,000 
340,320 
305,100 



$8,691,169 



Silver Dollars. 



18,846,067 
19,386,958 
19,454,054 
21,415,128 
22,084,203 
22,162,987 
24,018,528 

24,617,395 
25,146,260 
24,083,921 

25,377,379 
25,840,728 
25,850,000 
25,600,000 
26,711,000 
25,274,500 



$375,869,108 



Copper Dollars. 



15,966 
21,712 
30,654 
9,035 
41,364 
16,300 

14,035 
42,258 
11,972 



$203,296 



Summary. — Totals: Gold, $8,691,169; Silver, $375,869,108; Copper, $203,296; Grand Total, $384,763,573. 



EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF MEXICO FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINTS IN 1537, TO THE END 1 

FISCAL YEAR OF 1889. 



Colonial Epoch. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


COPPER. 


TOTAL. 




$ 8,497,950 
19,889,014 
40,391,447 


$752,067,456 
441,629,211 
888,563,989 


$200,000 


$760,765,406 
461,518,225 
929,298,3 2 9 






342,893 




Independence. 


$68,778,411 


$2,082,260,656 


1542,893 


$2,151,581,960 




$ 557,392 
45,040,62s 


$ 18,575,569 
740,246,485 




$ 19,132,961 
790,522,290 




$5,235,177 


Republic. 


$45,598,020 


$758,822,054 


$5,235,177 


$809,655,251 


Eagle coin, from 1st July, 1873, to 30th of 


$8,691,169 


$375,S69,io8 


$203,296 


$384,763,573 





SUMMARY. 

Colonial Epoch— from 1537 to 1S21, $2,151,581,960; Indeoeadence— from 1822 to 1873, $809,655,251; Republic— from 
1873 to 1889, $384,763,573- Total, $3,346,000,784. ' 

The returns from Mexico continue to show a steady forward movement, in full accord with the healthy progress of 
mineral developments and mining interests in the United States. This result is owing, in great measure, to the liberal and 
friendly policy of the Federal Government of Mexico, wh'ich has afforded enterprises of the kind every reasonable encour- 
agement. The prospects for the future are also very bright. 




/%J^44sCc*iJL5 



Vice-President .and. General. Manager. 



22 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 18, 1890. 




THE cold, wet weather thus far in January has been unfavor- 
able to all out-door trade and traffic. Travel has also been 
greatly interrupted by deep snow upon the mountains and wet, 
muddy roads in the valleys, retarding the mail and freight trains, 
and throwing business affairs into disorder. 

The markets are now well supplied with choice Riverside 
Oranges, both seedlings and navels, but the cold weather restricts 
the demand. They are held at $2.50(5) $3. 50 per box. Apples are 
quite plentiful, but slow of sale, unless strictly choice; a car load 
of choice Eastern "Ben Davis" Apples sold recently at auction at $4 
per bbl. ; packages of this kind are not desirable with us. Choice 
California and Oregon Apples are salable at $2@$2.50 per box. 
The market for Dried Fruit is very quiet. The stock of choice 
Raisins is running very light. There is a good demand for Prunes; 
Almonds and Walnuts rind ready buyers. The Honey crop of 
the State for 1889 is placed at 1,100,000 pounds; 507 bee keepers 
in the State; 64,630 hives; Ventura county produced 220,000 lbs. 
and Los Angeles county 120,000 lbs. 

The local markets have of late been superabundantly supplied 
with the California product of Japanese persimmons — our people 
do not, a yet, take kindly to the fruit— and as it is hard to sell, 
much of it has been dumped. Mikado Oranges have been received 
here to some extent from Japan, and sold readily in December, 
before the California crop came to maturity. They are of the mid- 
get variety; seedless, but of delicious flavor. 

The Pomona Fruit Cannery has recently made a contract with 
an Eastern firm, agreeing to supply 25,000 cases of fruit each year 
for three years. This is the largest sale of canned fruits to a sin- 
gle firm ever made in Southern California. The total amount of 
canned fruit and vegetables, put up in this State last year is not 
far from 1,500,000 cases. 

The Tomato pack of the United States in 1889 is placed at 2,976.,- 
7G5 cases, against 3,348,137 cases in the year preceeding. Cali- 
fornia fancy dried apricots evaporated are selling in New York at 
18c and 20c per lb. 

Our exports to Central America are steadily increasing, and for 
the past five years combined the aggregate sum reaches $5,222,- 
572. There is also a gain in our exports, Colombia (Ecuador) tak- 
ing considerable Flour; the export values for the past five years 
aggregate $1,115,109. Our export trade to Mexico is also on the 
increase, the total for the five years last past being $7,229,037. 
The trade with South America also shews a gain the last year; 
the total for five years, $1,568,246. Our shipments to Brazil, 
Peru, Uruguay and Chile for the year past consisted chiefiy of 
Wheat; say, in all, 553,914 ctls.; value, $705,824. Now the ag- 
gregate exports to the above countries for the past five years are 
$15,138,564. In the five years we sent a total of 678,946 bbls. 
Flour, while in 1888 Peru took 106,274 ctls. Wheat, and Brazil 
44,316 ctls. same. 

Imports for the week under review embrace the following 
leading items pr. Bk. Ferris S. Thompson from Colota Olivia with 
5,078 bags Nitre. From Antwerp per Clenfonarto, 2,920 bbls. 
Cement,.!, 333 Ingots Spelter, 325 bbls. Sulpher, 25,860 Coils Wire, 
74 Steel Blooms, 137 cases Marble, etc. Ship Charmer from New 
York with 507 bbls. Rosin, 17,000 cases Oil, 2,000 bbls. Mdse., 625 
bxs. Soap, 1,580 cases Canned Goods and a large quantity of Iron 
Pipe, etc. From Liverpool we have the Gudruse, after a long 
passage of 368 days. Her cargo consists in part of 33,380 bxs. 
of Tin Plate, 480 bags Wood Pulp, Chemicals, 457 cs. Sardines, eic. 

Recent Grain charters include the following: Br. iron Bk. 
Craigerne, 1,731 tons Wheat to Cork, U. K. Havre or Antwerp, 
£1, 13s. 9d; chartered prior to arrival. Ship J. B. Walker, 2,105 
tons, to Liverpool direct, £1, 10s. 3d. Br, iron Ship Hahneman, 
1,937 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K. Havre or Antwerp, £1, 13s. 6d; 
to a direct port, £1, lis. ; chartered prigr to arrival. Ger. iron Bk. 
Josefa 815 tons, Wheat to Cork, U. K. Havre or Antwerp, £2: 
direct port £1, 17s. 6d. 

Thirty whalers have sailed out of this port since November 1st, 
and there are yet quite a number fitting out for a cruise — say a 
score more. 

The Orange crop of Southern California the present season is 
placed at 960,000 boxes (say 3,350 car loads), of this 380,000 come 
from San Bernardino Co., 555,000 boxes from Los Angeles Co., 
and 25,000 boxes from Ventura and San Diego counties. 

Our trade with Great Britain in Exports in 1889 aggregated $19,- 
286, 3S6, being an increase over the year preceeding of $792,587. 
During 1889, we shipped hence 10,583,302 ctls. Wheat and 434,- 
429 bbls. Flour, being an increase last year of 1,050,734 ctls. Wheat 
and 161,668 bbls. Flour. The total value of Wheat and Flour com- 
bined for 1889 is $16,217,022. 



There are few things in which we do not excel, but we are confi- 
dent that in the making of saddlery and harness we have not our 
equal. This can easily be proven by paving a visit to the splendid es- 
tablishment of Main & Winchester, 214-220 Battery street, for in that 
store every kind of carnage furniture can be found. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 

Belcher Silver Mining Company. 
The regular auuual meeting of the stockholders of the Belcher Silver 
Miuiug Company will be held at the ottice of the Company, room 8, 
No. 327 Pine street, San Francisco, aliforuia, on 

Tuesday, the 28th diy of January, 1 890, at he hour of 1 P.M.. 
for the election of a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing year, and 
the transaction of such other business as may come before tue meeting. 
Transfer books will close on Saturday, Januarv 25, 1890, at 12 o'clock m. 

F. E. DltiTZ, Secretary pro tern. 
Office— room 8, 327 Pine street, San Francisco, California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Del Monte Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Del Monte 
Mining Company will be held at the office of the Compauy, No. 310 Pine 
street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, California, on 

Wednesday, the 29th day of January, 1890, atths hour of 1:30 P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Saturday, January 25, 18t)0, at 12 
o'clock M. J. W. PEW, Secret ry. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, San Francisco, California. 



ANNUAL MEETING. 



North Commonwealtfi Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the North Common- 
wealth Mining Company wiil be held at the office of the Company, No. 310 
Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, Sau Francisco, California, on 

Tuesday, the 28th day of January, 189 J, at the hour of 1:30 o'clock P. M., 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction of such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Saturday, January 25, 18dU, at 12 
o'clock u. J. w. PEW, Secretary. 

Office— No. 310 Pine street, rooms 15 and 17, Sau Francisco, California. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

The California Powder Works, 
230 California street, 

San Fkancisco, January 11,1890. 
Notice. — The annual meeting of the stockholders of the California 
Powder Works will be held at the office of the Compauy, No. 230 California 
street, on 

Monday, February 3. 1890, at 12 o'clock M. 
__^__ ______ _ JO HN F. J.QHSF-, Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Silver King Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Silver King Mining 
Compauy will be held at the office of tne Company, No. 2j Nevada Block, 
San Francisco, California, on 

Tuesday, ihe fourteenth (14th) day of January, 1890. at the hour of 1 o'clock, 
for the purpose of electing a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year, and the transaction oi such other business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Friday, January luh, at 3 o'clock 
p. m. A.UO. WATERMAN, Secretary. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Home Mutual Insurance Company. 
The next annual meeting of the stockholders of this Company will be 
held at its principal office. No. 216 Sansome s'.reet, Sau Fraucisco, Cal., at 1 
o'clock p. it , on 

Mo.Uay, January 20th, A. D. 1890, 
for the election of Directors, to serve until their successors shall be elected. 
The polls will be open from oue to 4 o'clock. 

CHAS. R. STORY, Secretary. 
San Fraucisco, January 2, 189 0. . 

"ANNUAL MEETING. 

Stockholders' Meeting of the Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation. 
The fifth- annual meeting of the stockholders of the Anglo Nevada As- 
surance Corporation will be held at the office of the Corporation, at No. 315 
Montgomery street, San Fraucisco, on MONDAY, January 20, 1890, at 3 
o'clock P. M. 
LOUIS SLOS3, President. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

The State Investment and. Insurance Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the above-named 

Company, for the election of a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 

year, will be held at the office of the Company, Nos. 218 aud 220 Sansome 

street, on TUESDAY, the 14th day of January, 1890, at 12 o'clock m. 

CHS. H. CUSHING, Secretary. 
Sau Fraucisco, December 24, 1889. 

HENRY C. HYDE, 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 

MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 

Of Handwriting, Inks, Papers, etc., in the Detection of Forgeries, 
Counterfeits and Imitations. 
41H4 CALIFORNIA STREET. San Francisco 

LOUIS R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 
The Highest tirade Champagne in the World. 

C^IR-TIE BLANCHE." 

(WHITE LABEL) 

A Magnificent Rich Wine. 
"a-IR-A-IsTX) -V-XjNJ- SEC," 

(BROWN LABEL) 7 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 

See that every Bottle bears the private label of 

MACONDRAY &. CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast 




■ 



-\\ FRANCISl NEWS LETTER. 



23 







THEY li.ivi- brought out a very useful glove. It is made of the 
to kid, and just in the palm is a tiny 
purse to hold a couple of sovereigns or small change. The purse 
fits into the hollow ,.f the palm, and is not the least bit uncom- 
fortable. I was at an •• at home " recently! ami a young girl wore 
one of the most stylish afternoon costumes that I have seen. It 
was a warm brown velvet, the overskirt being slightly caught up 
over what seemed to bean entire underskirt of golden otter. Over 
this dress was worn a short velvet coat of the same brown shade, 
with a Medici collar of the otter, and the upper parts of the 
- were of the same fur, which was high on the shoulders, 
and went into a point just above the elbow. With this costume 
was worn a large soft felt hat, matching the velvet, with two 
long plumes the color of the otter, arranged down the left side, the 
front of the hat being ornamented with a big brown moire bow. 
The coat had pointed cuffs of the golden otter. 

The fad of the hour in tea-gowns is the real Japanese Yum- 
Yum costume, with its wealth of stiff, metallic embroidery and 
its medley of gorgeous coloring, such as would not be tolerated 
in a fabric of domestic manufacture. A well-known firm recent- 
ly gave up one large corner window entirely to a collection of 
these robes, with the result of attracting a crowd of gazers at all 
hours of the day. One of the most noticeable gowns was of a rich 
royal blue silk, with much red, white and gold in its embroidery. 
All around the bottom, and cunningly adjusted amidst the folds 
of the waist, were bands of deepest capucine yellow, and down 
the center of the back was a breadth of silver gray. This dress 
was so modified in cut as to do away with the characteristic wide 
sash, which, when tied in a great, bunchy bow between the shoul- 
der blades, is neither pretty nor graceful, however quaint its ef- 
fect on a real Japanese maiden. 

An exquisite dinner gown of pale heliotrope and primrose is 
thus described : The skirt was of heliotrope Sicilienne, made quite 
plain and shaped over the hips. Over this was arranged a 
drapery of primrose crepe de chine, of a very fine transparent 
make, which came from the left hip, and falls in very wide pleats 
down to the edge of the skirt, forming a sort of zig-zag outline 
against the silk petticoat. The overskirt continues on the right 
side all the way down to the train, and is arranged in full folds 
till it reaches the center of the train, where it ends in more wide 
pleats, like those on the side. The other side of the train is of 
the heliotrope silk. The bodice is also of this material, made with 
a slight point back and front, and cut in a low round, high over 
the shoulder, though, with a wide pleating of the primrose crepe 
arranged around the neck in a fichu style. 

There is nothing very new in the way of lingerie, says a fash- 
ion writer. I saw rather a pretty robe de nuit, made in French 
cambric, with Vandyke points of insertion forming a square yoke, 
the same trimming being used on the top of the sleeve. The full- 
ness of the gown was loosely confined just round the figure, be- 
low the armholes, by a ribbon gathered through the material and 
tied in long ends in front. Under petticoats are very elaborate 
just now, and are mostly made of shot silk and even satin. They 
have three or four flounces, which are often caught, on the low- 
est flounces, with bows of silk ribbon. 

A gown which is more restful to the eye than some of the 
more brilliant ones is of dark green armure royale, upon which 
is a lighter brocaded stripe, showing considerable of the yellow 
green of the linden tree. The skirt is gathered across the back 
and hips, under a braided silk cord, in the two greens, which is 
brought around in front and knotted into a girdle, finished with 
ball pendants. The usual loose front is in this case of linden 
green surah, and is shirred some four inches deep at the throat. 

The old rose tints are not yet so passe but that we find a sample 
of them here in this wrapper of cashmere, which is also made 
with a Watteau, but gathered instead of pleated, and a full gath- 
ered skirt, bordered with rows of narrow black velvet ribbon, 
several of which girdle the waist, and trim the cuffs of the bishop 
sleeves. 

Flannel petticoats are still made of Saxony flannel, embroidered 
in cream and white silk. Dark heliotrope is very fashionable in 
Paris this winter, and so is liseron, a new mauve pink. 



The firm of William "Wolf & Co., the well-known importers and 
commission merchants have to be congratulated upon their new 
quarters, which are located at 327 and 329 Market street, corner Fre- 
mont street. The offices are large and airy, are well lighted and 
fitted up with every modern convenience, and in every way well 
adapted for their large and growing business. 



GRAND ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE ! 

MARVELOUS BARGAINS 
SEASONABLE DRY GOODS ! 

According to our regular custom, we begin the New Year with a GRAND 
CLEARANCE SALE OF THE BALANCE OF OUR GREAT WINTER 
STOCK, to make room for heavy consignments of spring goods, now in 
transit. To accomplish this result quickly we have made a STARTLING 
CUT IN PRICES that embraces every article in every department, thus 
affording an unparalleled opportunity for purchasers, as our offerings in- 
clude the LATEST STYLES AND NOVELTIES in 
Cloaks, Wraps, IVe remarkets, 

Jackets, Jerseys, Shawls, 

Colored Dress tioo<ls, 

Black Dress Goods, 

silks. Satins, Velvets, 
Laces, Klbbons, Trimmings, 

Gloves, Handkerchiefs, 

Uents' Furnishing Goods, 

Corsets, Hosiery, Underwear. 

House Furnishings, etc 



Note.— All are cordially invited to call and inspect our offerings, and 
thus obtain an idea of tue IRRESISTIBLE BARGAINS PRESENTED IN 
EVERY DEPARTMENT. 




MARKET AND JONES STREETS 
Incorporated 1884. 4qq y\ c res 

TREES .AJSTD ZPIL^lAJSTTS ! 
California Nursery Co., 

Niles, Alameda County California. 

LARGEST STOCK ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Fruit Trees, Nut Trees, Wine, Raisin and Table Grapes, Berry Plants. 

SEMI-TROPICAL FRUITS: 
Olives— A large collection of French, Italian and Spanish varieties. 
Oranges and Lemons-Home-grown Trees of all leading sorts; Cali- 
fornia and Florida kinds. 
A I.arge Stock of White Adriatic Fig, of various sizes and prices. 
ORNAMENTALS, SHADE TREES, EVERGREENS, SHRUBS, ROSES, 
CLIMBING PLANTS. ETC. 
For Complete List, send for our New Catalogue. 

CALIFORNIA NURSERY CO., 

Niles, Alameda County, Cal. 
JOHN ROCK, Manager. 



J. W. GIRVIN & CO., 
RUBBER AND LEATHER BELTING, 

HOSE, PACKING, ETC., 
RUBBER CLOTHING, BOOTS, SHOES, ETC. 

DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES. 
2 and 4 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

DR. POSEY 

HAS REMOVED HIS OFFICE TO 

404 GEARY STREET, BETWEEN KEARNY AND DUPONT. 

Eye, Ear, Throat, Nose and Gullet. 

Hours— 10 to 3; Sunday, 10 to 12. 



MME, WALDO-COHEN, 

Teacher of Piano-Forte and Singing, 
1315 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 18, 1890. 




THE diamond cutters of Amsterdam are in distress at lack of em- 
ployment. Never has such a plethora of diamonds been known, 
and there ia certainly no falling off in value, yet from some ec- 
centric turn of the industry in precious stones, the cutters of the 
Continent are not in request. It is said there are seven thousand 
of these workmen out of employment in Amsterdam alone. The 
art of cutting diamonds is, however, not a monopoly of the Dutch. 
Many London houses cut diamonds, and the same is the case in 
Paris; and, no doubt, as the love of diamonds and the supply are 
both rapidly on the increase, the perfection of the art of cutting 
will increase in London. 

The New World is in process of sending homes to the Old. The 
latest export from Canada takes the form of wooden houses, 
which are put together at the place of manufacture, in order to 
see that the " flats join," then the pieces are numbered, packed 
and floated down the St. Lawrence for exportation. No doubt we 
shall have a sight of these curiosities, ere long, in a certain subur- 
ban quarter where building is going on hand over hand, says a 
London paper. 

Madame Carnot was quite ill, but enjoyed having to lie by. She 
has been the busiest woman in Europe since she entered the 
Elys6e as mistress of the house — so much was required of her by 
what she felt to be the necessities of her very complex situation, 
and she had to take the initiative in all possible directions, with- 
out appearing to put herself forward too much. 

The fashionable mode of thieving in the metropolis, says a Lon- 
don paper, at present is to impersonate an inspector, and insist 
upon examing the drains, water-pipes, overhead wires, gas-piping 
or anything else thaf may occur to the ingenious imagination of 
the thief. As soon as they enter the house they contrive to ap- 
propriate any portable valuables that lie in their way. 



A ladies' dining-room will be one of the novelties of the inside 
of the House of Commons next session, says a London society 
paper. The fair ones have got so far: they are not what they are 
if they do not advance. We hope the next step will be a smok- 
ing-room, the final one on the floor of the Commons. 



The Swiss Nationalrath has just granted seventeen and a-half 
million francs for the manufacture of a new repeating-rifle. One 
hundred and fifty thousand weapons are to be constructed with 
the greatest possible rapidity, as well as forty-five million car- 
tridges, or three hundred for each rifle. 

Chewing-gum recently transmitted the germs of diphtheria from 
one little girl in Bridgeport, Conn., to three other small damsels, 
two of them dying a few days afterwards, says an Eastern paper. 
The habit of masticating gum must needs have some very weighty 
and, as yet, undiscovered merit, to offset the disagreeable and dan- 
gerous features of this practice. 

The Emperor William is said to be remarkably fond of ele- 
phants. On hearing, at Constantinople, that it was the intention 
to kill the Berlin elephant, Rostom, as it was very poorly, the 
Emperor at once telegraphed imperative orders that the event 
should not take place. 

Her Majesty recently commissioned the sculptor Pignatelli to 
execute a recumbent effigy of the late Duke of Albany for the Me- 
morial Chapel at Cannes. The figure is now completed, and the 
Prince of Wales will unveil it during his approaching visit to 
Cannes. 



For the Jamaica Industrial and Manufacturing Exhibition, to 
be opened in January, 1891, in the colony alone over £16,000 have 
already been guaranteed. The exhibition will comprise specimens 
of all Jamaica products. 



In one of his latest circulars Hardouin, the Paris stamp dealer, 
offered 120 francs each for all Tuscan stamps prior to 1860. If 
undefaced the prize offered is 400 francs. 

The estate of Dunmaglass has been sold, and the ancient name 
of Macgillivray disappears from the roll of proprietors of land in 
the Highlands. 

The Princess of Wales has graciously consented to become an 
honorary member of the Anglo-Austr alian Society of Artists. 

Marcus Mayer was asked what he considered the greatest sight in 
the world, when the great impressario thoughtfully stroked his chin 
and slowly said : " My dear boy, the most pleasing sight to me is to 
see and to drink a cocktail which has been made at the Grand Cen- 
tral Wme Rooms, 1G-18 Third street. They cannot be equaled by 
anything on this or on any other continent." 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants 

Nos. 309 and 311 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
Sole Agents Purimaohos Fire-proof Cement, "indestruct- 
ible and infallible." 
Sole Agents for " Bull Dog " brand of Bass' Ale and Guinness" 

STOUT-Bottled by Robert Porter & Co. 
Sole Agents Johnson's Elephant brand English Portland 

Cement. 
general agents— national assurance co. op ireland ; 
atla8 assurance co. of london ; 
boylston insurance co. of boston. 



H. B Williams. 



W. H. DlMOND. 



A. Chesebrough. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 



Agents for- 



Pacific Mail Steamship Company, 
Pacific Steam Navigation Company, 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship 

Company, 
"The California Line of Clippers," 

from New York, 



"The Hawaiian Line of Packets," 
The China Trade and Insurance Co. 

(L'd.), 
The Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

Steel Rails and Track Material. 



Steam Boiler Incrustations. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, by the Use of the 

LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND ONDENSER I 

.Over 300 In Daily Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 26 to 60 per cent, in the Amount of 
Water Used. 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded ou Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

330 Pine street. San Francisco, Cal. 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS. 

Agents for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, S. S. Hepworth's Centri 
fugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 
327 Market Street, corner Fremont, 

^ SAN FRANCISCO. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street, : : San Francisco. 

Gold and Sliver Refinery and Assay Office. 

gjtf~ Manufacturers of Bluestone, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot and 

The "Standard" Machine-Loaded Shotgun Cartridges, under the 

Chamberhn Patents, 

ARIEL LATHROP, WILLIAM HARNEY, TIMOTHY HOPKINS, 

President. Mgr. and Sec'y. Treasurer. 

GOLDEN 6ATE WOOLEN MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURE 

BLANKETS, CASSIMERES, TWEEDS AND FLANNELS. 
535 Market Street, San Francisco. 

CUNNINGHAM CURTISS, & WELCH, 

WHOLESALE STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS, 

327, 329, 331 SANSOME STREET. 
8. L. Jones. E. D. Jones. 

S. L JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 
207 and 209 California Street. 

ARCHITECTURE. 

AUUUSTUS LAVER (Layer, Mullnny .V lavcr) having returned 
from Europe, has resumed the practice of his profession. 
OOIcea, 93 Flood Building, corner of market and Fourth Sts., 

San Francisco. 

DRESS SHITS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS ! 

j . c o o f :e r, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

24 New Montgomery St., Palace Hotel Building. 



Jan. 18, 1890. 



SAN PB ^NCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



25 



THE PINE STREET FRANCHISE. 

TBBpeoplt nw were naod f<»r the procurement of b 

cable car franchise *»n Pine street, have abandoned their 
charter ami aske.l to be relieved from us obligations. There 
never wu« any donbl from the tirnt thai something >>f the kind 
would happen. Tin- ostensible promoters of the scheme never 
bad the remotest Idea of carrj ing it oat They were simply used 

. I «-ir other people whose bona fides were unquestionable. 

That may seem t«» some thoughtless minds a very unjustifiable 

proceeding, bnt that is a point in regard to which a great deal can 

i. The truth is that there is not B necessity for a road on 

Itreet al all. it could begin nowhere, and must needs end 
at the same place. It could not pet an outlet to the ferries nor 
pas? through the cemetery at Central avenue. It was not de- 
aired by the people on Pine street, and its effect must have been 
to reduce the revenue and depreciate the stock of the Colifornia 
and Sutter street roads, which are fully equal to the necessities of 
the existing traffic, and are not over profitable enterprises. There- 
fore there is a great deal to be said in justification of a line of 
action that shut off competition that would have done nothing 
but harm all round. Even the people who honestly intended to 
bui'd the road are without doubt by this time satisfied that they 
were well let out of an undesirable undertaking. What, how- 
ever, cannot be defended, is the action of the Supervisors. They 
betrayed their trust to the public at all points, and there is not a 
shadow of a doubt that they suffered no financial loss in conse- 
quence. It is not to the purpose that good may come out of 
evil. The intentions of rascals should be remembered. 



LONDON'S ONLY BEAUTY. 



IN many ret>pects London has no advantage over other cities: in 
several points it is even inferior to some, says the Nineteenth 
Century. The good taste shown in the architecture of its palaces 
and public buildings is not unfrequently questionable, to say the 
least. The West End itself contains few mansions that would not 
find their equals in Paris, Vienna or Berlin. The old monuments, 
scattered here and there about the town, are hardly more curious 
than those of most other nations, and sink into complete insignifi- 
cance when we remember those of Rome. The public gardens 
and parks, trim and well-kept as they are, exhibit nothing that 
to a greater or less extent, is not to be found in every wealthy 
capital in Europe. But that which can be seen nowhere but in 
London — that which gives it its stamp and its special beauty — is 
its night and its fog. 



A SOLDIERS' TRAIN. 



GERMANY knows how to turn to practical use her soldiers, and 
in the event of a great continental war it can be seen how 
valuable would the knowledge of train management be to her, for 
she already possesses a railway which is entirely worked by sol- 
diers and their superiors, who are specially trained for the pur- 
pose in the Eisenbahn Regiment. A further extension of military 
lines has now been determined on by the military authorities. It 
is proposed to connect the shot foundry, arsenals, and numerous 
otber workshops connected with them by a line which will enable 
all war-like materials to be rapidly collected and taken from Span- 
dau to Berlin. The line will cross the Spree by a new iron bridge. 

SOME interesting photographs have been sent to Nature by Mr. 
T. Child, who has just returned from Pekin, of two interest- 
ing old astronomical instruments at Pekin Observatory. These 
instruments are the most ancient of the kind in the world, hav- 
ing been made by order of the Emperor Kublai Khan in the year 
1379. They are exquisite pieces of bronze work, and are in a 
splendid condition, although they have been exposed to the 
weather for more than 600 years. They were formerly up on the 
terrace, but were removed down to theirpresent position to make 
way for^he eight instruments that were made by Jesuit Father Ver- 
biest in 1670, during the reign of the Emperor K'ang Hsi, of the 
present dynasty. 

WHEN Sullivan fights Jackson we shall have seen the end of 
pugilism. It had a long and nasty run, and has brought 
the public to the conviction that the only square thing to bet on 
is a chicken fight, because the birds cannot be bribed, and will 
manage the battle according to their own lights. 



The Spring term of the School of Design has commenced and 
offers rare advantages to art students. Its instructors are men of 
high accomplishments and great reputations, includ ng such well- 
known artists as R. D. Yelland, Arthur F. Mathews, Amedee 
Jouillin, Oscar and Lee Lash. The terms are exceedingly moderate, 
full particulars about which can be gained from the accommodating 
Secretary, J. R. Martin, at the school on 430 Pine street. 

The man who takes a pride in his person is always sure to wear a 
good hat, which is of splendid material and in the latest fashion. In 
order to get a hat which combines elegance and cheapness, White, the 
Hatter, of 014 Commercial street, should be patronized. His styles 
are truly elegant. 

Who is Muller? really, don't you know? the chief Optician, to whom all 
folks go. 



■JrMlL 




Binks— I'm plad you have gotten your liver in active service again, and 
have returned to French dinners. 

Jinks— Yes, I was cut out of French dinners for nearly a year. No use 
talkiug, they wear out a liver aud stomach very soon. But the -<Eina 
Mineral Waters with my dinners have brought me around again all right, 
and I cau now eat as heartily as before. 

Dr. David Wooster, the eminent physician of 746 Mission street, writes: 
I have used the Mtua. Miueral Waters in my practice for some time, aud 
cordially recommend it as one of the very best natural mineral waters in 
the market, as a daily drink. For disturbances in the functions of the liver 
and kidneys it is unsurpassed. 

ST. MATTHEW'S HALL, 

San Mateo, California. 



A SCHOOL FOR BOYS! 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR. 



Bill, ALFRED LEE BREWER, M, t„ Hector, 



jySEND FOR CATALOGUE."'®] 

Fresno and Merced County Lands to Rent and for rale. 

75,000 Acres of Wheat and Sngar-Beet Land in the above couuties to 
reut for a term of years. Also, 100,000 acres of fine Kaisin, Fruit, Alfalfa 
and Sugar-Beet Laud, with water for irrigation, for sale in tracts of from 
20 seres to large tracts suitable for colony purpose. For particulars apply 
to E E. PERRIN, 402 Kearuy Street. San Francisco. 







[L PE5Cr\lrfe>N5-3i"-nAT5 
EfC ■ n^N^p-wliH -"JHdv/T'AoST- 



S. F. Newsletter will be sent weekly to any address in the United States 
for $1.25 for 3 months, $2.50 for 6 mouth-, or $5 for 12 mon'hs. The subscrip- 
tionfor the Continent, Great Britain and the Colonies is: 3 mouths, $1 50; 
6 months, ?3; 12 months, $6. All subscriptions are payable in advance, and 
checks aud P. O. O.'s should be made payable to Publisher S. F. News 
Letter, Flood Building, Marketstreet.S, F. 



26 



• SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. IS, 1890. 



OBITUARY. 

THE death of W. T. Garratt, the well-known foundrynian, last 
Tuesday, was most unexpected. Mr. Garratt had been laid 
up with a short illness, hut no serious results were apprehended, 
and deep sympathy is felt for the bereaved wife, who found 
her husband lying dead upon the floor of the bath-room, which 
before he had just entered apparently well. The deceased was a 
remarkable man, gifted with boundless energy and great business 
tact. He was brought up in the iron business, and knew it thor- 
oughly, having woTked in boyhood in his father's foundry, at 
Cincinnati. He came to this coast in 1850, in the whaleship Gor- 
man, and at first went into mining. He subsequently formed a 
partnership with G. W. Shultz, of this city, and after many vi- 
cissitudes, founded the present business, of which he was the 
head. 

IT is our sad duty to vecord the death of the wife of General 
Dimond, which occurred last Tuesday night in this city. Mrs. 
Dimond had for many years been an invalid, and, in the hope 
of obtaining relief, she lived for a long time in the East, under 
medical treatment. On her return to San Francisco her health 
was so vastly improved that hopes were entertained of her re- 
covery and complete restoration to health. Some few weeks ago 
Mrs. Dimond was again taken ill, and which resulted in her 
death. She was a woman of many amiable qualities, kind and 
charitable to all those who were in need of a helping hand, and 
her toss will be severely felt by many who had been assisted by 
her. She leaves three children — Edward R. Dimond and Eleanor 
and Mae Dimond. 

IT is our melancholy duty this week to record the death of 
Stephen Franklin, who for many years had held the im- 
portant office of Secretary to the Bank of California. The de- 
ceased was SO years old, and for some five months past had been 
in feeble health. He came to this coast in 18-19, and engaged in 
the banking business. On the organization of the Bank of Cali- 
fornia, in 18G4, he was appointed its Secretary, which position he 
held till the day of his death. His only surviving child is Mrs. 
Uhlhorn, who resides at 1818 Pine street, at whose house he died. 

THE death of John S. Barrett, of the San Francisco Stock and 
Exchange Board, was heard with deep regret by his many 
friends. The deceased came to California in 1852, and for a time 
practiced law in Sacramento. In 1875 he went into the stock busi- 
ness, and in which, it is said, he accumulated quite a fortune. 
Mr. Barrett was sixty years old, and leaves a wife and ten 
children. He was a man of good impulses and of a generous 
disposition, and was held in high esteem by all who knew him. 

THE death was recorded during the week of Francisco Galindo, 
at his home in Temescal, Oakland, one of the few Spaniards 
who managed to retain their vast possessions after the advent 
of the American. The deceased leaves a large and valuable prop- 
erty, and his landed interests are estimated to be worth at least 
$300,000. Mr. Galindo was first married to the daughter of Salvio 
Paclieco, of Contra Costa, and then to a daughter of M. A. Peralta. 

THE telegraph brings to us the sad intelligence of the death of 
Walker Blaine, the second son of James G. Blaine. Mr. Blaine 
held the oflice of Solictor of the State Department, and is repre- 
sented as being the favorite son of the Secretary of State. The de- 
ceased was but 35 years of age, and had already given promise of 
a brilliant career, which has met with so unfortunate a termina- 
tion. The cause of the death is ascribed to acute pneumonia. 
JAMES F. MILLER, the auditor of the Customs House, died 
last Thursday at the Centennial Hotel, Oakland. The deceased 
was a man of most exemplary habits, and faithful to his duties, 
he having held the office of auditor for 25 years. He came to this 
coast in 1852 from Washington, D. C, with instructions to organ- 
ize the Customs House, which he did in a most efficient manner. 

THE death of John Martin, President of the Board of Port War- 
dens, was not unexpected, as for the past two years be had 
been in poor health. The deceased came to this Coast in 1850, and 
-went into the business of mining. On his return to the city he 
engaged actively in politics, and held many public positions, 
whose duties he always performed faithfully. 

EMLEN PAINTER, who had been in the drug business for sev- 
eral years in this city, died in Spuyten Duyvil, New York 
State, on January 15th. He was President of the American 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

THE death took place on January 15th of Catherine L. Hutchin- 
son, the widow of General C. I. Hutchinson, at the advanced 
age of seventy-four. 



Consumption Surely Cured. 
To the Editor: Please inform your readers that I have apositive remedy 
for above-named disease. By its timely use thousand of hnpelca* cases 
have been permanently cured. I shad be elad to send two bottles of my 
remedy free to auy of your readers who have lousumption, if they will 
send me their Express aud P.O. address. Respeetfully, 

T. A. S LO CCJM, M. C, 181 P earl St., New York. 

t RTlnlSSF* ,n f s 1 e 1 i **' es a »« toughs use Brown's Bronchial Troches. 
lake all ratify g /things, they are imitated. The genuine, are sold only Si 



MOTHERS ! 

The Largest Stock of Boys' Clothing io the Died States, 

All Wear-Resisting, Comfortable and Stylish hitting Garments. 

Material and m ke taken into consideration (strictly first- 
class) our prices will be found at l;_.st 50 per cent, less than 
the same class of goods can be purchased for elsewhere in 
this city. 

BOYS' CLOTHING DEPARTMENT double its former size. 

M. J. Flavin & Co., 

924: TO 928 IMZ^ZEaiCIET STREET, 
Through to 25 Ellis. 



Interior business solicited. Price lists free on application. Orders 
from the interior filled with care and dispatch. Fall and Winter Catalogue 
now ready. Postoffiee box 1996. 

^CANADIAN ANTHRACITE COAlT 

No Smoke! No Soot! Clean, Clear, Cheerful! 

Thirty per cent, more heating power than the bituminous coal sold in the 
ninrket. Can be burued in any furnace, range, stove or grate with a good 
draught. 

No more blackened ceilings No holes burned in carpets. Try it and be 
convinced. 

CANADIAN ANTHRACITE COAL COMPANY. 

Yard, < or. Second and Brannail. 

C^-Telephoue No. 1610. 
J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS.. Agents. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Overman Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors*, held 
ou the 31st day of December, 1889, an assessment (No. CI) of Twentv-five 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at 
the office of the Company, No. 414 California street, San Fraucisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon w hich this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 5th day of February, 1890, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 26tn day of February, 1*90, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

GEO D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 

Office— No. 414 California stre at, San Fraucisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Exchequrr Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby giveu that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the lfith day of December, 18S9, an assessment (No. 28) of Twenty-five 
(25) Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid ou 
The Twenty-first day of January, 1890, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on TUESDAY, the eleventh day of February, 1890, 
to pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses ol sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

CHAS. E. ELLIOT, Secretary. 

Office— Room 79, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fraucisco, 
California. 

assessmenTnotice. 

Silver King Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— J an Fraucisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Pioneer District, Pinal County, Arizona. 

Notice is hereby giveu that at a meeting of the Board of directors, heldou 
the loth day of January, 1890. an assessment (No. 21 of Thirty Cents (30c) per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation payable imme- 
diately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, room 20, Nevada BIock, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The twenty-sixth (26th) day of Feb, nay. 1890, will be delinquent, 
aud advertised for sale at pnblic auctiou; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold ou THURSDAY, the twenty-seventh (2-th) day of March, 
18'JO, to pay delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising aud 
expenses of sale. Bv order of the Board of Directors. 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 2 r >, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

W. H. Patrick, Teacherof the Piano, removed to 428 Geary Street. 



- 



SAN ill INCISI 'i NEWS LETTER. 



27 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 
PACIFli BTBTEN 

Train* Le»v« and are Due to Arrive At 
SAN FRANCISCO: 

liatii From January I. 1890. I arrivic 



7 JO a. 
T:JOa. 
7:80a. 
8:00a. 

8:30 a. 



10 Na. 

•lH»r. 
3:00 P. 
S.SOp. 
i W P. 

4:30 P. 



•4:30 p. 
5:30 P. 
6.00 p. 



7:00 P 
8:00 p. 



IU) w«r 1-. SHcs Hid Sau Jose "12:4fi P. 
jaemnlOA Ke.ldtug. vialtavls 
BacrmmeatD, Aoburo, Colfax. :>.4>r. 

Martinez. Vallejo, Cftllstog* aud 

mum K'^a Bilo ■ 

Express, Fresno, 
Bakerallfdd, VojavG and Ka>t. 
ami Lo> Angelas. 11:15a. 

Nile.-. San Jom.. tHoekton, Ioue. 
Sacraiueuto, Marvi-ville, Oro- 
ville aud Red Bluff 

Hayward* and Nlles. 

Hay wards, Nile> aud St 

Sacrameuto River Steamer:, 

Haywards, NUea aud shu .lose 

Becoud t'la.-* [or ugdeu & East. 

Slocktou aud ftMUCOu; Vallejo, 
Calutoga au.i sauta Rosa. 

Sacrameuto aud Kuigbt's Laud- 
lug via liavis 

Nile;- aud Livermore -- 

Ni les aud Sau Jose 

Havwards aud Niles 

Suiiset Koute. Atlautic Express. 
Sauia Barbara, Los Angeles, 
Denting, El Paso, New Orleans 
aud East 8:45 P. 

Shasta Koute Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysville, Keddiug, Port- 
laud, Puget Souud aud East 7:45 a. 

Ceutral Atlautic Express, Ogden 

aud East. -... 9:45a. 



5:45 v 


2:15 p 


\!:45p 


"6;00a. 


9:45 a. 


10:45 p. 


9:45A 


10:43 a 


•8:45 a 


14:15 p 


7:45 a 



Santa Cruz Division. 



J3:00a.. Huuters Traiu to Sau Jose. .. 17:20 P. 
8:15a. Newark, Ceuterville, San Jose, 
Feltou, Boulder Creek aud 

Santa Cruz 5:50p. 

*2:15p. Ceuterville, San Jose, AlmadeD, 
Feltou, Boulder Creek aud 

Sauta Cruz ... *11:50a. 

4-15 p. Ceuterville, Sau Jose and Los 

Gatos . ._. 9:50a 

Coast Division (Third a d Townsend Streets). 



7:25a. San Jose, Almadeu aud Way 

Stations 

8:30a. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Pinos, Pa- 
jaro, Sauta Cruz, Monterey, 
Pacific Grove, Salinas, San 
Miguel, Paso Kobles and Sauta 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) & 

priueipal Way Stations 

10:30a. Sau Jose, aud Way Stations.. 
12:01 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations . 

*3:30p. Sau Jose, Tres Pinos, SantaCruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, PacificGrove 
aud priueipal Way Statious . . *10:00 a 
Menlo Park aud Way Stations. . . *7:58 a 
Sau Jose and Way Statious . . . . 9:03 a 
Menlo Park aud Way Statious. .. 6:35 a 
Menlo Park and principal Way 
Stations f7:28p 



2:30 p. 



6:12 P. 
5:02 P. 



3:38 P. 



•4:20 P. 

5 -2.0 P, 

6:30 p. 

fll:45p, 



a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

♦Sundays excepted. -{-Saturdays only. 

{.Sundays only. ^Saturdays excepted. 

**Mondays excepted. 

PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 
For New York via Panama, 
S S. City of New York — Thursday, January 23d, 

at 12 o'clock noon, 
Taking freight aud passengers dire-t for— 
Acapulco, Champerico, San Jose de Guatemala, 
Acajutla, La Libertad, La Uuion, Punta Arenas 
and Pauama. 

For Hongkong via Yokohama. 

City of Peking Wednesday, January 22, 1890, 

at 3 p. m. 

City of Rio de Janeiro — Saturday, Feb. 15, 1890, 

at 3 p. m. 

China Tuesday, March 11, 1890, 

at 3 p. m. 
Round-Trip Tickets to Yokohama and return at 
reduced rates 
For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, coi- 
ner First and Brannan streets. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

Agents. 
Georg e H. Rice, Traffic Manager. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT'S STEEL PENS. 

Gold Medal, Paris, 1878. 
#H^These Pens are "the best in the world." 
SoTeAgent for United States, MR.HY.HOE. 91, 
John Street, N. Y. Sold by all Stationers. 



"My man," said the contractor, " what is 
your name? " '' McGinty, sor." " How would 
you like to go to work digging a well for me? " 
" An' go to the bottom av the hole? Divil a 
bit, sor. We name's agin me. 

— Merchant Traveler. 



THE UNIVERSAL MALADY. 

Why i> all the honse bo dismal? 
Papa's got the grippe. 

Why this look that's so abysmal? 

Papa's got the grippe. 
Why this coughing and this sneezing? 
Why this blowing and this wheezing? 
Why that tone ami manner freezing? 

Papa's got the grippe. 

What's this turmoil and confusion? 

Mama's got the grippe. 
She knows well it's no illusion; 

Mama's got the grippe. 
Back and head and eyes are aching; 
Brain feels heavy, kneey are shaking; 
Don't the children get a raking? 

Mama's got the grippe. 

Why this bowling and this yelling? 

Baby's got the grippe. 
Whew! of all his woes be's telling. 

Baby^s got the grippe. 
What a squirming and a kicking, 
Just as if a pin were sticking 
In his tender liesh and pricking. 

Babys got the grippe. 

Ob, for some relief effective 

From this cursed grippe! 
Oh, for some new fierce invective 

To describe the grippe. 
When you've taken six or seven 
Quinine pills and need eleven 
More, it makes you sigh for heaven, 
Where there is no grippe. 

— Somerville Journal. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE." 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 1889, and 
until further notice, Boats aud Trains will 
leave from aud arrive at the Sau Fraucisco Pas- 
seuger Depot, MARKET-STREET WHARF, as 
follows: 



AN improved sleeping berth for ship's use 
has been patented. The inventor'sjjaim 
was to arrange and suspend a ship's sleep- 
ing berth that its equilibrium is maintained 
under all conditions in order to counteract 
the uneven motion of a ship when at sea, 
and by this means prevent nausea and sea- 
sickness caused by the rolling and pitching 
of the vessel. The principle adopted is 
that the weight of the occupant is counter- 
balanced by means of adjustable weights 
made to run in slots at either end of tbe 
atus combinedwith it is encompassed within 
uprights supporting the berth, the appar- 
atus acting inversely to the motion of the 
vessel. The whole of the berth and appar- 
an iron frame carefully balanced upon two 
substantial columns. By this means the 
lateral motion of the vessel acting upon the 
berth is subdued and controlled, the undu- 
latory motion of the berth being resisted 
by atmospheric pressure from air chambers 
above and below the berth, which is thus 
regulated relatively to the violence of its 
motion. 



THE appointment by Governor Waterman 
of Alexander Badlam to be one of the 
Fort Wardens, in the place of John Martin, 
deceased, is an excellent one in every way. 
Mr. Badlam is a man of considerable execu- 
tive ability, and is well liked in the com- 
munity, and will undoubtedly fill the posi- 
tion with credit. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. S., Hawaiian and Colonial Mails. 

Will leave the Company's Wharf, MissionStreet, 
No. 1, 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 
Sydney, Without Change: 

The Splendid New 3,000-ton Iron Steamer 

Alameda Tuesday, January 14, 1S90, at 4 p. m- 

Or immediately on arrival of the English mails. 

For Honolulu: 

a. S. Australia (8,000 tons), Jan. 31, 1890, at 12 M 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office. 327 Mar- 
ket street. jQHN ^ spRE0KELS & BR0S __ 
General Agents. 



Leave S. F. 


Destination. 


Arrive in S. F. 


g& |8»»^» 


Sundays! *•£ 


7:40 a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 


8:00 A.M. 
6:00 p.m. 


Petal uma 

and 

Santa Rosa. 


10:40a.M|8:50a. M. 

6:10p.M 10:30 A.M 

.! 6:06P.M. 


7:40 a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 


8:00a.m. 


Fulton 
Windsor, 
Healdsburg, 
l.il l mi Springs, 
Cloverdale <& 
Way Stations. 


6:10p. m. 


10:30a. m 
6:05p.m 


7:40a.M. 


8:00 a. M. 


Hoplaud 
and Ukiah. 


6:10 p. M. 


6:05 p.m. 


7:40 a.m. 


S:00a.m. Guerneville. 16:10p.m. 


6:06p.m. 


7:40 a.m. 
5 :00 p. M. 


s . nn , „ I Sonoma and 110:40a.m. 

8.00A.M.| Glen E „ en | 6 . 10pM 


8:50a.m. 
6:05 p. M. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for White Sulphur 
Springs, Sebastopol and Mark West Springs: at 
Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, at Cloverdale for 
the Geysers, at Hopland for Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs, and at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs, Blue Lakes, Willits, Cahto, Capella, 
Potter Valley, Sherwood Valley aud Mendocino 
City. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from. Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, ?1 50, to Sauta Rnsa, $2 25: to 
Healdsburg, $3 40: to Litton Springs, $3.60: to Clo- 
verdale, $4 50: to Guerneville, $3.75: to Sonoma, 
$1.50: to Glen Ellen, $1.80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sunday only- 
To Petaluma, $1; to Santa Rosa, $1 50: to Healds- 
burg, $2.25: to Littou Springs, $2 40; to Cloverdale, 
$3: to Guerneville, $2.50: to Sonoma, $1; to Glen 
Ellen, $1.20. 

From San Francisco for Point Tiburou and San 
Rafael, Week Days— 7:40, 9:20, 11:20 A. M. ; 3:30, 5:00, 
6:15 p.m. Sundays— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. ; 1:30, 5:00, 
6:20 p. M. 

To San Francisco from San Rafael, Week Days— 
6:20, 7:55, 9:80 A. M. ; 12;45, 3:40, 6:05 p. M. Sundays— 
8:10, 9:40 a.m.; 12:15, 3:40, 5:00 p. m. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week 
Days— 6:50, 8:20, 9:55 A. M. ; 1:10, 4:05, 5:30 p. M. 
Sundays— 8:40, 10:05 a.m.; 12:40, 4:05,5:30p.M. 

On Saturdays an extra trip will be made from 
San Francisco to San Rafael, leaving at 1:40 p. m. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

«3»-TICKET OFFICES-A! Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and No. 2 New Montgomery Street. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will 6ail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers MEXICO aud UMATILLA direct 
for VICTORIA, B. C, aud PUGET SOUND ports, 
at 9 A. M. every Friday. 

The steamer UMATILLA, sailing every other 
Friday, at 9 a. m., connects at Port Townsend 
with Steamers IDAHO and ANCON for Alaska. 

Foe PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
the O. R. AND N. CO., every four days. 

Fob SANTA CRUZ, MONTEREY, SaN 
Simeon, Cayucos, Port Harford, San Luis Obis- 
po, Gaviota, Santa Barbara, San Buenaven- 
tura, Hueneme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and 
San Diego, about every second day. 

Fob EUREKA, ARCATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, Tuesday, at 9 a. m.— LOS ANGELES. 

For POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, etc., every 
Monday and ThursdaY, at 4 p. m. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. '214 Montgomery street, 
Near Pine. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Fraucisco. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 
Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST AND BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 o'clock p. M., for YOKO- 
HAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yoko- 
hamawith Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer. 1890. 

Oceanic Tuesday, February 4. 

Gaelic ... . . .Thursday, February 27. 

Belgic Saturday, March 22. 

Oceanic. 'I uesday, April 15. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 
Cabin Plans on exhibition aud Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, or at 
No. 202 Market street{ Union Block) San Francisco. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 
GEO. H. RICE, Traffic Mauager. 



r 



i 28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 18, 1890. 




REFERRING to the " Aggrandizement of the Executive in Ger- 
many," the Economist says: "A process is going on in Germany, 
on which it would be probably unsafe for German journals to 
comment, but which deserves the attention of all who feel any 
interest in European politics. Quite by degrees, but still with 
noticeable rapidity, every personage conspicuous in the Empire 
is retiring into the background, and the single figure of the young 
Emperor — now within a few weeks of thirty-one years of age — 
is, so to speak, filling up the stage. The world outside Germany 
hears nothing of the minor princes, nothing of their Parliaments, 
nothing of their Premiers, one or two of whom are said to be men 
of decided ability. The Generals are scarcely named, except, in- 
deed, when the Emperor supersedes them; the statesmen, Prince 
Bismarck excepted, are never discussed; and of the Parliamentary 
personages, only Herr Reichter and Herr Windthorst flit at inter- 
vals across the scene. The Emperor is the only person who is 
always visible, traveling or visiting subordinate Courts, or mak- 
ing speeches strongly imbued with his own personality. Even 
Prince Bismarck retires in favor of his master, and transacts his 
business in Berlin with the least possible intrusion of bis own 
great place in the Empire. He may be ' lying low ' purposely, 
but be is not nearly so prominent as in the old Emperor's reign. 
The young Emperor is becoming all in all, and it is evident that 
this is his intention." 

New Britain, in the Bismarck archipelago, can hardly be a 
pleasant place of residence for unmarried ladies, for, according to 
a consular report, it is learned that the Papuan inhabitants of the 
island of New Guinea have a curious custom of confining their 
girls in cages inside their houses until they are old enough to be 
married. They are never allowed to leave the house, and are 
taken out of their cages once a day in order to be washed. In 
spite of this, the report adds, they are said to grow up healthy 
and strong. Evidently Papuan parents have not much faith in 
the discretion of their daughters ; but as it is stated that Americans 
have acquired much property and importance in the island, they 
will doubtless soon prove to the inhabitants that the American 
fashion of making daughters practically independent of their 
parents' supervision is nearer to true civilization than keeping 
them secluded, & la Louis XL, in cages. Whether the results will 
sonduce to an improvement in Papuan morals remains to be 
ceen. 

The Court Journal says, Stanley will certainly need a lion's con- 
stitution to stand all the banquets and other ceremonies that are 
in course of being arranged in his honor, in anticipation of bis 
arrival in London. Already upwards of twenty complimentary 
gatherings are being promoted, and there are mention of as many 
again, though some of these will probably fall through. We have 
been told of Mr. Stanley's hair turning white during his recent 
struggles and privations. No importance need be attached to this 
fact, as he will, immediately on his arrival, have the means at 
hand — price, half a crown a bottle — of correcting the error. 

Nothing can give a better idea of the amount of money lying 
around for investment in the "Right, little tight, little island," 
than the immense activity that has been displayed during the 
past year in the promotion of companies, and the extraordinary 
flow of money that has found investment in the various enter- 
prises started. It is stated that the new securities offered in 
London during 1889 reached a total of about 190 millions sterling, 
or 25 millions more than the preceding year. It is probable that 
about one-half of these new companies secured their capital, so 
that 100 millions of John Bull's sterliijg went last year into the 
development of enterprises in all corners of the globe. 

England in 1881 had 19,813 miles, capitalized at $4,325,000,000, 
or $218,000 per mile. The United States in 1888, 156,000 miles, 
capital $9,3G9, 000,000, or $60,000 per mile. England paid in divi- 
dends during the years 18S7 and 1886 an average of 4.22 per cent.; 
in 1888 only 7 per cent, of these roads neglected to pay dividends 
— this includes roads under construction — while $9,000,000 capital 
during that year earned 15 per cent., which year was unusually 
profitable. Altogether, the profits of English roads are larger 
than our own, according to the annual report of the British 
Board of Trade. 

The Paris correspondent of the Times recently declared that 
according to the best information he could obtain, " the prospect 
of prolonged peace has never for fifteen years been so tangible." 
This essay, in which the reasons for this hopeful conclusion are 
given, contains no new information, but it does contain a state- 
ment of very great value, which, though not new, is worth re- 
peating. The work of mobilizing a first-class modern army is 
estimated at £20,000,000. To support the army in its mobilized 
condition would cost about £40,000,000 a month. If the view 



commonly held, that a continental war between any two great 
powers must involve the entrance of the other three into the 
struggle, the first cost of mobilization for Continental Europe 
would be £100,000 000, and the subsequent expenses at the rate of 
£200,000,000 a month. This is only a part of the cost, for several 
of the States not directly concerned would be compelled to in- 
crease their military expenditure. Though the amounts may 
possibly be somewhat exaggerated, they give a fair idea of the 
kind of sums which the next European war will cost. In short, 
a European war means general bankruptcy and a return to the 
conditions of misery which followed the peace of 1815. The 
Times' correspondent is not far out in his conclusion, which 
should be seriously considered, both in England and on the Con- 
tinent. 



FRENCH HOSPITALITY. 



FOREIGNERS in France appear to be welcomed if they spend 
money and do not compete with the natives. Under the new 
views of liberality sanctioned by the Republic the foreigner is in- 
tolerable the moment he enters upon a career of usefulness in 
business. One paper in Paris is clamouring against the Germans 
who do business on the Bourse, and pays Frenchmen no compli- 
ment as masters of finance in saying that the Germans perform 
all the great operations and are monopolizing the market. This 
testiniony to the ability of the Teutons is deemed sufficient ex- 
cuse to demand their expulsion from the Bourse, in which event 
a considerable share of the business now transacted would prob- 
ably be carried on outside. that centre of finance. France is un- 
doubtedly losing its gaiety for the foreigner when the French 
themselves are losing their manners and are ill-tempered. — Court 
Journal. 



CATARRH. 

Catarrhal Deafness— Hay Fever— A New Home Treatment.— Suf- 
ferers are not generally aware that these diseases are contagious, or 
that they are due to the presence of living parasites in the lining mem- 
brane of the nose and Eustachian tubes. Microscopic research, how- 
ever, has proved this to be a fact, and the result of this discovery is 
that a simple remedy has been formulated whereby catarrh, catarrhal 
deafness and hay fever are permanently cured in from one to three 
simple applications made at home by the patient once in two weeks. 
N. B. — This treatment is not a snuff or an ointment; both have been 
discarded by reputable physicians as injurious. A pamphlet ex- 
plaining this new treatment is sent on receipt of stamp by A. H. 
Dixon & Son, 337 and 339 West King street, Toronto, Canada. 

— Christian Standard. 

Sufferers from Catarrhal troubles should carefully read the above. 

The Mexican Lottery. 
City of Mexico, January 9. — The regular monthly drawing of the 
" Lottery of the Beneficencia Publica" took place to-day in the 
Moorish* Pavilion. T!oe following numbers drew the principal prizes: 

23.800 $'10,000 

6.180.. 20.000 

i 290. 10.000 

16 39.". 2 000 

70 950 ' 1,000 

01.098 1.000 

8.978 1.000 

Capital prize sold in City of Mexico; second prize sold in Morelia; 
third prize sold in Portland. Me. ; fourth prize sold in San Francisco. 

It is a pity that we cannot place so high a duty upon this cold 
and damp English weather, as to prevent it ever again visiting us. 
But then this is the time when a bottle of Guinness & Co. 's Extra 
Stout does a person so much good that it almost provides raiment 
as well as food and drink, and makes one almost forget, the climate. 
The well-known firm of H. M. Newhall & Co.. 309-311 Sansome 
street, are the sole agents for this porter, which is known by the bull- 
dog trade mark. It is bottled by Robert Porter it Co. 

Among the many departments at Nathan. Dohrmann & Co., 124 
Sutter street, is an* art repair shop, where ornaments are most skill- 
fully repaired, so that the joint can hardly be perceived by the naked 
eye. This department is indeed a valuable addition to their ware- 
rooms, as those who have been unfortunate in meeting with an acci- 
dent to their articles of virtu can always have the same so deftly 
mended that irs value is not impaired. 

The Baldwin Hotel has undoubtedly a reputation second to none 
in the country. It boasts of a splendid service and accommodations 
which cannot be equaled. Its situation is central, and it is eminently 
adapted to the requirements of those who have to live down town. 

Who carries the optiriaa sway, 

Auil sives the be^t for moderate pay, 

And is the optic chief lo-day? Mcller ! 

The best fitting Shirts in San Francisco can be bought of J. W. 
Carmany & Co., 25 Kearny street. 

A musicale will be given by Mme. C. Zeiss at Irving Hall on 
the 29lu inst. An interesting programme is being prepared. 

No one need be troubled now with a bad skin, when Madame Ra- 
chel's Bloom of Youth for the complexion can be so easily procured. 

Japanese curios of the quaintest kind can be purchased of Marsh 
& Co., under the Palace Hotel. 



Numter 31. 



Vol. Xt. fAH rRANOl* ^ 

News Be 

(Talifornia Ai>bcrtiseir. 

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?:■ ■>«'- ioHV)' 01 •"«:'■■" i-» FrxuteU >. i" <'\fornia,asgccond<lai8Viatt€r. 

SAN FR.4 ' 'SCO, SATURDAY. JANUARY 25, 1890. 



.ABLE OF CONTENTS. 



LlADINff ARTICLE* : PAGE 

Th.- * rober of Commerce 
V ....... 1 

Tex - Treaty .1 

M^rrtav ....■ Elerual? . 2 

TheTra.Uof Chili 2 

After the Sea* 2 

The Snow B !e 2 

An Infant [ndutfli j at Rest - . 2 

Au Ambulance Corps 3 

The Trouble iu Brazil 3 

Stanley and Emiu 3 

The Influenza and the Weather 3 

Silver 3 

Society. ... 4 

Society Manners 5 

Pleas.ro's Wand 6 

Pleasure's Wand (continued) . . 7 

The Masculiue Maid 7 

Society Tippliug 7 

Sparks 8 

The Railroads 9 

Sporting. 10 

The Portuguese Navy 10 

The Receiving Hospital 11 

The Colonel's Omission . .11 



Page 

" Les Relevailles " 11 

The Library Table 12 

Mr. Kendal's Imagination 12 

The Rose Jar 13 

Financial Review 14 

Town Crier 15 

Sunbeams 16 

Scientific and Useful 17 

Real Property 18 

Bourse and Underwriter. 19 

Our Benedicts 20 

Vanities 21 

"Biz" 22 

World, Flesh and Devil 24 

Amontrthe Americans - 25 

A Noble Institution 25 

Au Uufortunate Ghost 25 

Obituary 26 

Ncllvaud We 26 

The Highest Railway 26 

The Crocker Astronomical Expe- 
dition 26 

Au Execution in Tonquin 27 

Frye's Subsidy Scheme 28 

Comments on Foreign Affairs 28 



THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MEETING. 

THE annual meeting of the Chamber of Commerce the other 
day, was so satisfactory because of the business transacted, 
that the members may well be congratulated upon the result. To 
be sure the attendance was not as large as it might have been, but 
then the weather was severe and the dangers of la grippe im- 
minent. Well-to-do merchants are not so numerous as to cause 
anybody to desire that those we have should take any needless 
risks. The slim attendance the other day was, therefore, meas- 
urably excusable. It is to be hoped that it will be larger next 
time. It does not look well and it is not just to the members who 
do attend punctually, to have to wait more than an hour whilst a 
quorum is being drummed up. The individual members would 
scout the business man who would fail in any such way to 
promptly keep a business appointment. Why should there be 
less exactitude in the matter of assembling to transact the public 
business of the Chamber? There is no reason on earth why there 
should be, and it does not look well nor favorably impress the 
public when there is. In other respects, the meeting was, as we 
have said, a success. The new President was duly installed and 
entered upon a year of office, that we verily believe, promises 
new life and vigor to the Chamber. Ex-Governor Perkins is just 
the man to carry the Chamber successfully over the present criti- 
cal period in its history. It has recently been under fire and has 
received some wounds. It has been voted slow and not in step 
with the march of progress, "which we do not believe to be alto- 
gether true. A Chamber made up of successful commercial men, 
is by nature and interest, a conservative body, and only does its 
duty in exercising moderating and conservative influences. Yet 
it is possible to put down the brakes when they are not needed, 
and to keep them down after they would be better up. There is 
a time for everything. A time to march as well as a time to halt. 
There seems to be a very general concensus of opinion 
that the local Chamber has been halting quite long 
enough, and that the time has fully come when it should enter 
upon a steady and determined forward movement. It is fortu- 
nate in having at such a juncture so active a stepper as George 
C. Perkins to lead it. The utterances of the Chamber the other 
day were all, with one exception, admirable. The answer to the 
New York Chamber on the subject of Chinese exclusion was able, 
dignified, and in every way worthy of the occasion, which is say- 
ing not a little. When the solid merchants of this coast, who 
have the closest commercial relations with China, declare that our 
trade is in no manner of danger by reason of the Exclusion Act, 
their word will be implicitly relied upon by reasonable men every- 
where, and the effect in quieting the alarms of the East cannot 
fail to be good. It is to be regretted that the Chamber did not 
feel justified in promptly indorsing the National Bankruptcy Act 
now before Congress. That failure will prejudice our merchants 
in the East, where such a law is loudly called for. Our merchants 
buy largely in the East, and they cannot afford to have it go 
forth that they are not in favor of a law that will enable a dis- 
honest debtor to be effectually brought to terms in this State. 
They should quickly retrace their steps in regard to this subject. 
In all other respects the late meeting did well. 



TEXT OF THE SAMOAN TREATY. 

THE fall text of the treaty negotiated at Berlin has just now 
for the first time been made public, and diifers very widely 
from the synopsis that was given out at the time. We do not 
know who was responsible for the statements supplied to the as- 
sociated press for publication, but it is clear that more or less of a 
fraud was palmed oil upon the public by somebody. If the facts 
had been made clear as to what had been done and left undone in 
regard to Samoa, whilst the public mind was interested in the 
subject, the general verdict would have been very different from 
what it was, and no such blundering instrument as that which 
now awaits the ratification of the United States Senate could in 
that case have secured its approval. We think the associated 
press is face to face with an obligation which it cannot afford to 
ignore. It telegraphed all over the country a statement of the 
terms of the treaty, from which its more important features were 
carefully and studiously eliminated. Either it received its in- 
formation from a responsible source, or it did not. Either it was 
used by a knave to serve some purpose best known to himself, 
or it knowingly deluded its patrons. It must accept one horn of 
the dilemma or the other, and must suffer in public estimation 
until it explains which. Now that the full text of the treaty is 
to hand, we learn for the first time that it possesses two control- 
ing features of over-shadowing importance, of whose existence we 
had not previously so much as dreamed. 

The supreme power over both whites and natives is vested in 
an official to be appointed jointly by the three treaty powers, who 
is designated " chief justice," and paid $6,000 a year out of the 
revenue of the little island kingdom. It is idle to talk about Mal- 
ietoa or anybody else being king, whilst the representative of the 
treaty power that may be in the ascendant (which is never likely 
to be the United States), wields the unlimited and unparalleled 
power suggested and intended by the document we are now dis- 
cussing. In all the world besides there will not be such another 
autocrat. He will not need to hide himself behind the throne 
whilst wielding greater power than the throne itself. He can 
stand in front of the king and mock him to hia face. He is at 
once the King, Lords, and Commons of England, the Emperor, 
Chancellor and Reichstag of the German Empire, and the Legis- 
lative, Judicial and Executive authority of the United States, for 
the purposes of supreme rule in Samoa. He makes, interprets 
and executes the law, with nobody on the spot to say him nay, 
and subject to recall only when the three powers can unite to 
that end. It requires no great knowledge of the world, or ex- 
perience of human nature, to realize the fact that a one man 
power will surely, under such circumstances be abused, and that 
it will not for long be submitted to by the class of British and 
American adventurers who are accustomed to take refuge in 
these far-off islands. The scheme will fail, and that ignomini- 
ously. It will be well if the attendant circumstances are not 
fruitful of scandal and shame. 

But the still more seriously objectionable feature of the treaty 
is that which finally and irrevocably disposes of every acre of 
land within the entire group. It is an objection of such dimen- 
sions and force that it ought, even at this late hour, to procure 
the rejection of the treaty by the Senate. It should be remem- 
bered at the outset that cupidity to obtain lands without paying 
any substantial consideration therefor, has been at the bottom 
of all the troubles that have afflicted Samoa. When the Berlin ne- 
gotiators first reported, it was said that a land Court to inquire 
into" and pass upon land titles had been provided for. It was 
hoped and believed that the Court would have power to reject any 
and all titles for which no adequate payment had been made and 
which have ever since been held for purely speculative purposes, 
as was done by the British in Fiji. But the text of the treaty dis- 
closes the ugly fact that all land transactions recorded in the dif- 
ferent Consulates prior to 1879 are confirmed and the business of 
the land Court in regard to them is confined simply to the adjust- 
ing of boundaries that overlap. Now what does the confirming 
of those titles involve? We turn to the Samoan official documents 
transmitted to and printed by Congress for an answer. We find 
that the total area of the Samoan group is 670,720 acres. It fur- 
thermore appears that prior to 1879, titles to no less than 692,722 
acres were recorded, or 2-1,002 acres more than the islands consist 
of. Yet the new treaty confirms all those titles en bloc. The Ger- 
mans claimed 135,122 acres, the British 282,600 acres and Ameri- 
cans 276,000. Our commissioners doubtless consented to the ar- 
rangement in the belief that their countrymen were doing very 
well in the partitioning of things. If so, they were grossly and un- 
pardonably mistaken. The fact is, and the printed reports before 
Congress show it, that the Americans assigned their rights to an 
English firm long ago, and except a few business lots in Apia 
Americans do not own a foot of land in all Samoa. By the treaty 
we get nothing, yet we become parties to the confirming of as ras- 
cally a steal as was ever imposed upon a poor, ignorant, and de- 
fenseless race. The Germans excused their acts of war by saying 
at the time that the natives trespassed and pilfered cocoanuts, 
bread fruit, etc. The British Commissioner well replied that in 
view of the land claims '• they had either to trespass and pilfer, or 
die." The perpetuation of that state of things now depends upon 
the U. S. Senate. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1890. 



IS THE MARRIAGE CONTRACT ETERNAL? 

r PHIS question, one in which every man and every woman is 
1 closely concerned, leads us. in our endeavor to find the answer 
thereto, from the firm standing ground of earth, where everything 
is submissive to the senses, into paths misty and supernatural. 
The question is, whether the matrimonial contract entered into 
between a man and a woman in this " vale of tears " holds good 
in the future higher state of existence. The scripture tells us that 
in heaven "there shall be neither marrying nor giving in mar- 
riage," and when we bear in mind the purposes for which the in- 
stitution of marriage exists, we must justly reason that marriage 
and its attendant obligations cease with life. The conditions of 
the future state are obscure and mysterious; to assume, there- 
fore, that the sublunary relation of wedlock is recognized in the 
celestial world, is a bold flight of the imagination. Then the ques- 
tion presents itself whether, if a man's first wife dies, and he 
marries a second, are they both wedded to him eternally? And 
should number two die, and he take unto his bosom a third, will 
he possess all of them equally in perfect tranquility? One of the 
most powerfully intellectual men of the age, viz.. Mr. Gladstone, 
is of the opinion that the marriage tie is eternally indissoluble; 
but then, other profound thinkers tell us the direct opposite, and 
in truth, neither one opinion nor the other can be relied upon, for 
neither are founded on the rock of actual fact, but only on the 
sands of imagination, sentiment or tradition. In fact, it would 
seem that marriage is a human, and not a Divine institution; or 
rather, an institution intended by Providence to meet only the 
necessities of this life, and that, therefore, when we cast off hu- 
manity we cast off all human ties. There is a beautiful theory 
that for every living man there exists one particular woman, who 
is destined to meet him in his path through life, and become one 
with him in flesh and spirit. This is a noble thought, and the 
realization of this beautiful ideal is the chief happiness of life. 
But we shall find comparatively but a few who regard marriage 
as the fusion of two souls into one forever, and that their motives 
for marriage spring from sources far less ethereal than this, the 
frailties of man frequently making this high consummation un- 
attainable. Moreover, we are confronted by the questions, 
whether a civil marriage is valid, or only one performed by a 
clergyman of some religious denomination? Can a man eternally 
marry his deceased wife's sister in Australia? And are those 
nuptial knots so easily and lightly tied in the States of Ohio and 
Indiana to be considered everlasting? There is certainly no more 
beautiful thought in all poetry than this one of (he unity of two 
souls for life, and then, passing through the portals of Death, be- 
ing still one forever. Yet if it is only a tender, unstaple thought, 
given over to the dominion of the ideal, it may still be beneficial 
to ponder it awhile, thereby leading us to think more seriously of 
marriage and its consequences, when perhaps the divorce courts 
would be emptier, men more just, and women happier. 

THE TRADE OF CHILI. 

IT has been held that if there be any one of the South American 
Republics more than another with which the United States 
can surely cultivate an enlarged and profitable trade, it is that of 
Chili, which is well fixed financially, is enterprising and is steadi- 
ly governed. Possessing a progressive spirit, large productive 
capacities, and being very willing and even anxious to do busi- 
ness with whomsoever it can be done with advantage and profit, 
it would seem eminently fitting that the United States should 
make its first bold and aggressive effort for trade enlargement 
with the rich Republic of Chili. That effort should be directed 
from San Francisco, because of our location on the Pacific. The 
Pacific Mail steamers should be paid a subsidy to continue their 
voyage on from Panama to Valparaiso. Indeed, they should be 
induced to cultivate relations all down the Pacific side of this 
continent. Every port should be tapped for the purposes of trade 
and brought into regular and frequent communication with San 
Francisco. That is the way to cultivate commerce. That is the 
way Great Britain has won it. It is the way in which Germany 
has nearly doubled her exports during the last ten years. At 
present England has about all the trade of Chili that is worth 
having, and it is very rapidly increasing under her management 
of it. A Santiago paper shows that the following were the values 
of imports for the years 1887 and 1888: Great Britain, 1887, 
$44,977,972; 1888, $56,898,407. Germany, 1887, $5,071,232; 1888, 
$4,751,990. France, 1887, $3,312,223; 1888, $4,295,055. Peru, 1887, 
$1,050,786; 1888, $2,071,304. United States, 1887, $2,611,384; 1888, 
$2,070,694. The insignificant figure cnt by the United States 
teaches the necessity of a strenuous effort to do better. When 
we turn to the list of imports which go to make up the foregoing 
figures we find that Chili buys a long line of articles that this 
country is abundantly able to supply. That is the promising 
feature of the case. It evidences the fact that there is trade there 
for us, if we will but go after it and cultivate it. The principal 
imports from Great Britain were machinery for railways, mines, 
farms machine shops and printing offices; steam engines for dif- 
ferent purposes; cotton and woolen cloths, ready-made clothing, 
furniture, carpets, coal, paints, tea, wines, liquors, refined sugar, 
earthenware, preserved fruits and dried fish. There is scarcely 
an article in tbat long list but could be supplied from this port. 



AFTER THE SEALS. 

SENATOR PLUMB, of Kansas, thinks the lease of the Alaskan 
seal fisheries is so good a thing that the government ought to 
keep the business in its own hands and operate it for the benefit 
of the public treasury. He would allow nobody to catch seals 
but the natives, and nobody to buy them at first hand but the 
government. He would then have periodical sales of the skins 
by public auction in San Francisco. It is another drift in favor of 
nationalism. The United States government is to become the 
great furrier of the world. No doubt the government could run 
the business after a fashion, just as it could run most, if not all, 
the businesses in which men engage, but that is not the t^rty of 
government, nor the policy of the country. The governmental 
affairs of the United States have hitherto been run on very differ- 
ent lines. Paternalism has been eschewed and the individual en- 
terprise of citizens has been left free to develop the country, and 
a marvelous success it has been. We have embedded deep in our 
system the doctrine that that government governs best which gov- 
erns least. From that wise rule we are not likely to depart in 
regard to the sealskin business. The Secretary of the Treasury 
has done well to extend the time for bidding for the new lease, 
and he would have done better if he would have allowed present 
arrangements to stand for another year, whilst the government 
settles the Behring Sea question. It is now known that a rea- 
sonable adjustment of the difficulty can easily be had. England 
is as much interested as we are in preserving the rookeries from 
which she derives even more profit than we do. The treatment 
of the sealskin is an English trade secret, which greatly inures to 
the profit of that country. With an international guarantee for 
the exclusion of outside marauders, the lease could be competed 
for understandingly. 

THE SNOW BLOCKADE. 

THE unlucky people who were caught in the snowbound trains 
have had a hard time of it, and would have had a harder if it 
had not been for the energetic and well-directed efforts of the 
railroad managers to provide and hasten relief. It is many years 
since a like detention from a similar cause was experienced, but 
what has happened is by no means unparalleled, as the writers of 
the day seem to imagine. During the first two or three years 
after the completion of the railroad, snow blocked the track quite 
frequently in winter, and for a time it was feared that the Central 
and Union Pacific could never become a safe and reliable winter 
route for passengers and mails. But the building of many miles 
of strong and costly snow-sbeds practically overcame the diffi- 
culty, and until this season the trains have been put through with 
remarkable certainty and regularity. The late storm in the Sierras 
has exceeded the experience of recent years, and for once proved 
more than the railroad authorities were able to cope with. In 
1872 the detention was much longer and the hardships endured 
much more severe — as the writer has good cause to remember — 
than anything which can possibly happen now. The trouble was 
then experienced in xhe Rockies in the Union Pacific's territory. 
During the whole of the month of February of that year there 
was a snow blockade, during which the passengers suffered ter- 
ribly. Food fell short, and people were glad to get salt buffalo 
and crackers. The snow, which formed into solid ice as fast as 
it fell, threatened to bury the trains, and would have done so but 
for the stupendous efforts of the railroad men. It was a hard 
time that will never be forgotten to those who experienced it. 
No such prolonged and severe experience is ever likely to be en- 
countered again. 

AN INFANT INDUSTRY AT REST. 

THE California Hosiery Company has closed its mills in Oak- 
land, and wound up its affairs. This action throws about a 
hundred and fifty people out of employment. Labor Commis- 
sioner Tobin is going to hold an inquest to find out the cause of 
the dissolution. It is easy enough to tell what the result of a 
scientific autopsy would be. " Protected to Death " would be the 
epitaph on the tomb of the California Hosiery Mills. The opera- 
tives who shouted for protection to American labor a little over a 
year ago have been choked on duties averaging 67 per cent., and 
they would have choked still faster if the duties had been a hun- 
dred per cent. The militant wool grower is destroying his own 
market with untiring industry. People cannot wear raw wool, 
and as the taxes on the material make the manufacture of woolen 
goods unprofitable, we are rapidly learning to depend on foreign- 
ers for everything of that kind. We have no foreign market for 
wool or woolens, and we are rapidly losing our grip on the home 
market. We imported last year over $70,000,000 worth of wool 
products, an increase of $7,000,000 over the previous year. 
Meanwhile our cotton and leather trades, which have free raw 
materials, were never more prosperous, and our imports in those 
lines are steadily diminishing. Mr. McKenna is a member of the 
Ways and Means Committee of the House, and is helping to get up 
a new tariff bill. The abandoned Oakland hosiery mill is in his 
district. Mr. McKenna ought to do something for it. Perhaps it 
could be used as a factory for Zulu assegais if sufficiently high 
duties were put on those articles to make it worth while. 



Jan. 25, 1890. 



- \\ FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER, 



AN AMBULANCE CORPS. 

THK.Wvi Letter has always Btrenooaaly advocated the estab- 
lishment of an ambulance corps in connection with the City 
Racdvtag Hospital. It has long contended thai Ibe absence of 
eaaary a vehicle fox the transportation of injured people 
grace to the city, and it> stand has been Indorsed by tne 
:i charge of the various hospitals. The manner in 
which those unfortunates who have been either injured by cable 
cars, knocked senseless by impndent ami careless wagon drivers, 
or received hurt in a thousand and one ways among a reckless 
community, are carted to the Receiving Hospital, is brutal. There 
is no other word in the English language, which so fitly describes 
the treatment which a man who has been suddenly taken sick 
upon our pavements meet with. lie is grabbed by a rough pol- 
iceman, who either calls for a hack or an express wagon, and un- 
ceremoniously dumps in "the load " as the patient is euphonious- 
ly termed, ami is then jolted over the streets to the shambles at 
the old City Hall, with a guardian angel in the shape of a burly 
officer, and a club sitting by him, ruminative as to how much 
whiskey the unfortunate had drunk in order to have got in the 
way of the cable cars, or be taken ill. It is ten chances to one 
that if the poor fellow did not lay as still as the traditional mouse 
the officer would soothe him into peacefulness with his "billy." 
But from present appearances it looks as if this disgraceful state 
of affairs will shortly be changed, and it is to be hoped that as the 
Board of Health intend to hold an investigation into the manage- 
ment of the City Receiving Hospital, stirred on to this action by 
Governor Waterman, they will see that one of the reforms needed 
is the doing away with the present alleged ambulance, and the 
formation of an ambulance corps. Dr. J. H. Stallard, the well- 
known President of the San Francisco Polyclinic, who has given 
considerable attention to this subject, says that the new hospital 
over which he presides intends to urge the establishment of an 
ambulance corps. The doctor says in order to make the service 
efficient it will be necessary to have three ambulance wagons or 
one to every 100,000 inhabitants. A capable man, not necessarily 
a physician, would have to be attached to each of these wagons, 
which would be furnished with stretchers, bandages and also in- 
struments necessary for the preliminary treatment of patients. 
Dr. Stallard contends that there is no necessity for a member of 
the ambulance corps being a physician. Any intelligent man who 
attends some twelve lectures, which will be given by the heads 
of this corps, would obtain sufficient knowledge of what is re- 
quired to alleviate the pain of those injured. After having heard 
a course of lectures the men would be furnished with a badge, 
which would entitle him to attend a patient. The doctor argues 
that this would be particularly beneficial to those persons who 
work in foundries and other places where accidents are liable to 
occur, as ten chances to one there would be a member of the am- 
bulance corps in the establishment, who would have some rudi- 
mentary knowledge of the art of healing wounds. In order to 
still more perfect the ambulance system there should be ten beds 
placed in the Polyclinic Hospital with attending physicians, for 
the use of such unfortunates, or in some other convenient place. 
The doctor insists that in order to make the ambulance corps a 
success the appointments should not be dependent upon the will 
of the Board of Supervisors or upon politics. In conclusion Dr. 
Stallard says that the Polyclinic is prepared to receive such 
patients, as it has both drugs and doctors, the only thing wanting 
being the beds. 

THE TROUBLE IN BRAZIL. 

THE meagre scraps of news that are allowed to leak out of Rio 
de Janeiro suffice to indicate that there is trouble brewing in 
Brazil. The doubts which well-informed people continue to ex- 
press as to the stability of the so-called republic, are largely based 
on the wide extent of the territory, the want of real community 
of interest between the provinces, the heterogeneous character of 
the population, and the ignorance and semi-barbarism of a large 
portion of it. It is not enough, as every one knows, to get rid of 
a monarch in order to set up a republic. There must be enough 
community of ideas and aims among the people, and enough po- 
litical capacity among the leaders, to re-organize the government 
after the monarch has gone. The indications are that these 
things do not exist in Brazil, and in that case early failure 
or years of internecine strife are to be expected. It should be re- 
membered that it was not any active public sentiment which 
called into existence the present state of affairs. The revolution 
was wrought by the army. It was the troops, and not the people 
that did the work. It was a General in full mutiny against his 
superior officer who gave the old Emperor notice to quit. It is 
this same mutineer who is now at the head of the Government. 
He holds the capital by military force. He issues orders to him- 
self, and is only answerable to himself. No constitutional gov- 
ernment, either monarchical or republican, was ever successfully 
set up by such instrumentality. Human nature must grow to be 
other than it is before a parliamentary republic issues all at once 
from a military revolt, under the auspices of a General who gave 
a sovereign of fifty years' standing only twenty-four hours' 
notice to leave the country, and put him on shipboard as a pris- 
oner, and then rules with a palpable lust of power. 



STANLEY AND EMIN. 

IT is sincerely to be hoped that Emin will, notwithstanding un- 
favorable reports, pull through all right. The great work of 
African civilization has need of his experience and undoubted 
abilities. If he gets well and gets back to Europe there would 
seem to be every prospect of an Anglo-Geriiian row, much like 
that in which Sir Morcll Mackenzie figured. The Berlin news- 
papers have for some time been severely handling Stanley for his 
stories about Emin's vacillation, and threaten him with exposure 
when Emin reaches home. Stanley's statement is that after reach- 
ing Emin, through incredible hardships, he found him surrounded 
by mutinous troops, whom he (Stanley) had to thrash into subor- 
dination, and that for months Emin was unable to make up his 
mind whether to come away with him or stay behind, thus caus- 
ing the whole party great delay and danger. The German theory, 
on the other hand, is that when Stanley reached Emin's territory, 
instead of commanding a real rescuing force, he was at the head 
of a small band of ragamuffins, whose assistance seemed a mock- 
ery, and that Emin was naturally reluctant to abandon a province 
which he had ruled for years, to go off: with such a party. It 
will be seen that in these two opposing views there is room for a 
newspaper controversy of first-class dimensions. The sympathy 
of the world, however, will be with Stanley. To have reached 
Emin with any kind of a force, even with a single follower, was 
the exploit of a ben), and no want of welcome from Emin can 
diminish his glury. It is one of those cases in which both sides 
may be right without discredit to the other. But the newspapers 
will not be likely to let it rest that way. Both men have their 
specially good qualities, but Stanley's dash and daring have won 
him too much success for his glory to be dimmed now. 

THE INFLUENZA AND THE WEATHER. 



WHAT is the matter with our glorious climate ? Will the clerk 
of the weather never again have compassion upon us and 
let up? Since Thanksgiving Day, some eight weeks ago, there 
have only been about two or three days on which there has been 
no rain. Over thirty inches have fallen since then in this city, 
and there are parts of the State in which as much as eighty-four 
inches have poured down. Fancy itl Seven feet of water is a 
mighty deluge, calculated to inspire confidence in the story of 
Noah and his Ark. Nothing like our present experience has ever 
before been witnessed in these parts, and the worst of it all is 
that there are no present signs of an abatement. The thing has 
really become wearisome and monotonous to an extent that not 
only exhausts human patience but endurance also. As might 
naturally enough be expected, pretty nearly the whole city has 
been or is down with colds that, if not carefully nursed, lead to 
bronchitis and pneumonia. As the weather continues unfavor- 
able, it will be the part of wisdom for our people to take increased 
care of themselves. There is no very serious danger in the 
physical trouble now being experienced, if due care be taken, but 
there is very grave danger indeed if anything like neglect be in- 
dulged in. It is folly, nay more, it is madness, to palter with the 
first evidences of a cold at this time. The evidences of the evils 
of neglect are all around us, and should serve as all-sufficient 
warnings. Old men and feeble women who can remain withindoors 
should do so. The other day, in a street car, no fewer than five 
babies were observed in the arms of mothers who appeared to be 
in circumstances of sufficient wealth to have permitted of their 
remaining at home. With greater care the death rate would not 
have advanced as it has. 



SILVER. 

IF the news were true that the Bank of England had determined 
to issue notes, redeemable in silver, to the extent of one-third 
of its reserve fund, it would be the grandest piece of information 
that has yet reached the silver men. It would have to be taken 
as conclusive evidence that England sees her way clear to giving 
silver a lift that could not fail to do much to greatly advance its 
selling price, and to ultimately bring it up to par value in its old 
proportions with gold. It would be the greatest monetary revo- 
lution of our time. It would indicate that England had been 
assured that Germany would follow her example. But, unfortu- 
nately, there is only too much reason to believe that the report is 
without foundation. The Bank of England could not act in the 
manner suggested without obtaining an act of Parliament amend- 
ing its charter.. It cannot issue notes for less than £5, and its 
reserve must consist of gold. It is not likely that an enabling 
act is to be asked for, and it is still more unlikely that it could be 
obtained if it were. So serious a change in the monetary policy 
of the country would have to be made a ministerial question of, 
and that is a risk no government would take without the justifi- 
cation of pressure from without, of which there are no signs at 
present. Besides, if anything of the kind were known to be con- 
templated, silver bullion would quickly respond to the movement 
and experience a rapid advance. As a matter of fact, it has de- 
preciated in the London market during the week, which is con- 
clusive that there is nothing whatever in the report which has 
been telegraphed to this country. There is no doubt but that 
England would like to advance and steady the price of silver, but 
she knows the risks of attempting anything of the kind alone. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1890. 



AND the rain it raineth every day, has become the burden of 
our song, and apparently the end is by no means yet. There 
are some people whom I have met in the world who profess that 
they like to hear the drip, drip, drip of the rain against the win- 
dow panes, declaring that it acts as a sedative to their nerves. To 
all of them I would like to say that were they in San Francisco 
this winter, they would, I think, find the incessant patter of the 
raindrops irritating instead of soothing, for of late it has been 
the only sound that greets one's ears, and one's feelings are wound 
up to such a pitch that I fear, were the author of that well-known 
poem about the beauty of the rain to visit San Francisco at pres- 
ent, he would run the risk of being mobbed. The rain is becom- 
ing just a trifle monotonous, and " Where does it all come from?" 

One of last week's pleasant gleams of brightness was the dance 
at the Occidental on Wednesday night, at which Miss Maud 
Badlam appeared as hostess. The large hall made a beautiful 
ballroom, and the evening was given over exclusively to tripping 
the light fantastic, with an excellent supper as a delightful finale. 
Another was the musical evening at Mrs. John Vance Cheney's, 
which was devoted to the works of Hadyn and Mozart. 

The wedding of Thursday evening of last week was one of 
much interest in the Jewish and French circles of our city. The 
bride was the pretty young daughter of Mr. E. J. Lyons, the 
groom Mr. Albert Haas, a rising young merchant of El Paso, 
Texas. It was most unfortunate that the weather should have 
proved so unpropitious as it did, for the wedding was solemnized 
at home, and the house being too small to comfortably entertain 
all the invited guests, a supper tent had been erected in the gar- 
den, but owing to the deluge which fell that day and evening, all 
idea of using it had to be abandoned. However, as many of the 
expected guests were laid up with colds, there was found to be 
room enough and to spare indoors after all, and the elaborate 
supper was served in the dining-room, where the tables were set 
during the pauses of the dance. 

This week has been the quietest of the present season. Even 
concerts have failed to appear upon the programme, and of several 
opera parties that were arranged to be given not one of them came 
off. It may, however, be called a week of dinners, a number of 
those termed diners intimes having taken place, which form of en- 
tertainment, by the way, Mrs. Hager has very extensively in- 
dulged in this season. The chief events otherwise were the club 
dance at Mrs. Hopkins' and the amateur musicale at Mrs. Dennis 
Donahoe's, to which may be added the matinee at Mrs. Colton's 
this afternoon. It will be the first time that Mrs. Colton has 
played the hostess in quite a long period, of late years she having 
allowed that duty to devolve upon her daughter, Mrs. McLane 
Martin, whose last appearance in that role, if I remember correct- 
ly, was at her musicale for the Boston Quintette during their first 
visit to San Francisco. Mention must also be made of the first 
of a series of receptions, given at Odd Fellows' Hall, on Wednes- 
day evening, by the Veterans of the National Guard of California. 
The decorations of the hall were beautiful and artistic, consisting 
of flags and streamers intermingled with Japanese umbrellas and 
lanterns, fantastically arranged, with the usual grouping of arms, 
helmets and laurels generally seen at all military entertainments. 
Music first, and then addresses of welcome from Col. William C. 
Little and Col. J. H. Dickenson were followed by dancing, the 
floor being under the supervision of Mr. Ed. Greenway, that most 
indefatigable of all floor managers, which was kept up with zeal 
until a late hour. The inclemency of the night and the prevail- 
ing epidemic of colds prevented the attendance of a good many 
who wished to be there, but on the whole, the evening may be 
considered a decided success. 

Next week promises well in every line. In the first place we 
are to have the postponed Ferrer concert on Monday night, when 
we shall have an opportunity of bidding* adieu to several mem- 
bers of that talented and popular family, who are about leaving 
us for the East. On Tuesday evening Miss Gertrude Goewey 
gives a young people's dance. Wednesday is the evening chosen 
by Mine. Zeiss-Dennis for her musicale, which promises to be the 
society event of the concert season ; and also by Mrs. Dr. Brighani 
for her reception and dance at her lovely home on Broadway. 
Friday night will be well filled also. The Bachelors' Club. cotil- 
lion, which at the beginning of the season was set apart for the 
Army and Navy, will be danced at B'nai B'rith Hall. Mme. 
Sanderini will give a concert at Odd Fellows' Hall, and the His- 
torical Carnival will open at the Pavilion. 

One or two events contemplated for the first week in February 
are contingent upon the weather, and how much of a hold the in- 
fluenza has upon us by that time. One thing, however, is certain, 
which is that Mrs. Delmas' long talked-of ball, named for about 
that period, will not take place till after Easter. She finds that 
moving into, and getting settled in her new home on Taylor 
street, will be a more tedious affair than she thought it would be, 
and has therefore very wisely put all present idea of entertaining 
out of her mind until that has become quite an accomplished 
fact. 



To the bridal receptions I mentioned last week, may now be 
added those of Mrs. Jos. Donahoe, Jr. on Wednesdays. Mme. de 
Guigne and Mrs. Hayne (who are the joint hostesses of the Sut- 
ter street castle in the absence of their mother, Mrs. Parrott) are 
now at home on Thursday evenings; and Mrs. McLane Martin 
will receive on Tuesday afternoons in February, in what is still 
known as the Colton mansion, on California street. The man- 
agers of the Historical Carnival, to be given by the Church of the 
Advent, showed decided wisdom in postponing the opening, 
which was named to have taken place last Saturday. It makes 
one shiver to think of the atmosphere of that vast Pavilion in 
such weather as we have had this week, and now if King Pluvius 
will only behave himself and withdraw his visitation for a while, 
the prospects of the entertainment being a success are very good, 
indeed. The next charitable affairs on the carpet are the benefit 
for St. Luke's Hospital, to be given by the Bohemian Amateur 
Opera Bouffe Company, who will sing The Chivies of Normandy, 
and an Art Loan Exhibition, which will be opened in February 
by the ladies of St. Luke's Church, in aid of the church debt. 

The two great topics for talk this week have been the coming 
and departure of Nelly Bly on her rush around the globe, and the 
snow blockade in the mountains. Those who escaped detention 
in the snow-sheds and got here before the big storm are congratu- 
lating themselves on their narrow escape from such a disagreeable 
imprisonment, among them being Mrs. and Miss Eyre, who are 
at home again at the Palace. Miss Inez Shorbe has been spending 
some time in town as the guest of Mrs. Floyd, on First street, and 
Miss Julia Peyton, of Santa Cruz, has been visiting Miss Daisy 
Casserly. Among the arrivals of the week by the route which is 
now the sole way of reaching San Francisco is Mr. George Berton 
and his bride, direct from France, where their wedding took place 
a short time ago. 

Mr. R. B. Brenham, son of the late Captain C. J. Brenham, will 
be married to Annie K., daughter of the Hon. and Mrs. J. I. Dow- 
selt, at Honolulu, next Thursday evening, January 30th. 

Felix. 



Champagne.— The year 1889 has been remarkable as far as the 
champagne trade is concerned. The importations were larger than 
they have ever been before. The increased demand for champagne 
is due in a great measure to the fact that sparkling wines have been 
adopted by the American people as their fashionable drink ; but it is 
also owing, in no small degree, to the superior quality of the wine 
that is now being shipped to this country. The sparkling wines used 
at Mr. Ward McAllister's New Year's Ball were three— Moet it Chan- 
don's Brut Imperial, Louis Koederer's Vin Brut, and Perrier-Jouet 
Special. 

Perrier-Jouet & Co. 




W. B. CHAPMAN, 



SOLE AGENT FOR 
PACIFIC OOAST, 

123 California St. S.F. 



EPERNAY CHAMPAGNE. 

FOR SALE BY ALL FIRST-CLASS 

Wine Merchants and Grocers. 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

Maqdire, Rial & Osbourne Lessees 

TWO WEEKS, TWELVE NIGHTS AND TWO MATINEES. 

FOURTEEN PERFORMANCES, COMMENCING 

MONDAY February 10, 1890 

GRAND ITALIAN OPERA COMPANY, Under the Direction of HENRY 

E. ABBEY and MAURICE GRAU. 

MADAME ADELINA PATTI. 

MADAME EMMA ALBANI. SIGNOR FRANCESCO TAMAGNO. 

Chorus of 80; Orchestra of 60; 24 Danseuses; Military Band of 30 

SCALE OF PRICES : 

Season, IU Performances. Single Night. 

Parquette and Orchestra Circle J 70 00 ? 7 Ou 

Dre-sCircle ™ 00 7 00 

Family Circle— Season Tickets. 14 Performances 42 00 4 00 

Proscenium Boxes, 6 seats each .. 600 00 60 00 

Mezzanine Boxes 350 00 30 00 

General Admission 2 00 

Gallery .- . •„, ., 1 00 

THE SALE OF SEATS BY AUCTION.— Beginning Wednesday, January 
29th, at 12 noon, Proscenium and Mezzanine Boxes will be sold for the 
sea; on at auction, at the Grand Opera House, under the direction of Messrs. 
Ea-tou, Eldndge & Co. 

SEASON SALE.— On Thursday, January 30th, at 9 a.m.. the sale of seats 
for the spason only, of 14 performances, 12 nights and 2 matinees, will be- 
gin at the Music Store of Sherman, Clay & Co.. corner Sutter aud Kearny 
streets, aud continue till Saturday, February 1st, 5 p. M. 

SINGLE NIGHT SALE.— The sale for single nights will commence at 
Sherman & Clav's Music Store, on Monday, February 3d, at 9 a. m 

MARCUS K. HAYEK, Acting Manager. 



Jan. 25, 1890. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



SOCIETY MANNERS. 
[Ry Di Vkrxos.] 



I>- a rt re, the venerable Julia Ward Howe asked the 

' answering it in the 
negative. The reason for this lamentable falling off in Chester- 
Qeldlan ired to be the Fact, satirically stated, that 

obliged to go to their children for points regarding 
; t that the young people were not always re- 
lentors. But, whatever may be the reason, it is not to be 
that so-called polite society too frequently is lacking in the 
essentials of true politeness. Some one has denned the most per- 
irtesy, and the best manners to be the outcome of a good 
While it is not to be gain saved that a villain of the deepest 
dve may have the polish and the graces of a Chesterfield and a 
Beau Brauimel, without true nobility of character, without a 
pure, clean, white soul, there will be lacking that indefinable 
something, that essence of true courtesy which always distin- 
guishes the real from the imitation. Much of all the ill-breeding 
of the present day. perhaps, may be traced to the fact that many 
of our present social lights are the first of their family to tread on 
polished floors, to part brocaded portieres, or to wear, not the 
waiter's, but the gentleman's dress coat. From such is not to be 
expected that ease of manner, that quiet dignity, that air of being 
at home, which is the inheritance of one whose ancestors for 
generations have been accustomed to all that was refined, cultured 
or elegant. 

Another reason for the prevailing lack of courtesy is to be found 
in the intense selfishness of the different members of society. 
When a man is over-impressed with a sense of his own import- 
ance, when he is determined to have a good time at all hazards, 
careless of what inconvenience he may cause others by his selfish 
pursuit of his personal pleasure, what can be the result but a 
series and succession of bad manners ? 

Every lady who gives a party makes the same complaint, " The 
men won't dance." "What makes military affairs so charming so- 
cially? Because the army men, as well as those in the navy, dance, 
dance well, dance early and often. It may be true what some 
civilian, envious of the popularity that a military man always 
enjoys, urges as excuse for his own dereliction, " Those military 
fellows can sleep next day if they want to, while we who are 
slaving away in mercantile life are never able to snatch an extra 
hour's sleep." But whatever is the cause, the men do not meet 
the hopes of their hostess and dance as they should, though they 
betray an eager appreciation of the punch-bowl and an alarming 
readiness to attack the supper table. What is to be said of the 
gluttony of a man, a young man, and one whose undeserved good 
fortune has made him the escort of a pretty girl at supper, when 
he seizes a champagne bottle and places it at his feet, half hidden 
against the folds of the lady's tulle skirts ? Could anything be 
much more disgusting? Yes; when young men come as guests 
to a house where the well-known and staunchly-advocated tem- 
perance principles of the hostess preclude all chances of copious 
potations, and bring their own liquor with them, when they 
drink in their dressing-rooms and leave rows of empty bottles as 
their reproach to their hostess for not having set up a free bar. 
"My rooms look like a junk-shop," exclaimed the indignant 
hostess after one of her parties. Could anything be a grosser in- 
sult? Yes; when the men who have been invited as partners for 
the sweet young girls leave the ball-room and return again reek- 
ing with the fumes of brandy and cigars, and then present them- 
selves to the ladies. Or they get boosy and dreadfully stupid, and 
forget to come back at all, or if they do come, they are foolishly 
hilarious or sleepily familiar. Will any one dispute that drunk- 
enness is wretchedly bad manners ? 

" No, don't introduce him," said a bright young lady at an 
evening party. " He wouldn't ask me to dance, he'd scarcely 
exchange a word with me ; he has no time to lose in his still-hunt 
for a rich girl; he knows all the heiresses in the room; hewillnot 
look for one in my quarter; besides, I have seen his rudeness in 
asking one girl to dance and ignoring another at her elbow at the 
same time; it's the way he does it; spare me the mortification of 
knowing him." Now, when a man is so careless of his conduct 
as to be criticised justly in that style, his manners must be ex- 
ecrable. 

Nor can the gentler sex be absolved from the charge of dis- 
courtesy. They lie about their engagements to escape an unde- 
sirable partner; they slip away with some one they prefer to the 
next name on their list, and in some secluded nook they elude 
the claims of those who have been allowed to put their name 
upon their cards. They, too, pay assiduous court to the punch 
bowl, and are not slow to appreciate the pleasures of the table. 
They are guilty of many an act of rudeness, for which they should 
blush if they have not already lost the power. Why do human 
beings act like animals ? Why do people, whom we know sit 
down every day to at least three full and sumptuous meals, act 
like starvelings when they come in range of a well-spread board? 
Why do guests forget to be ladies and gentlemen ? Why do debu- 
tantes forget that their greatest charm is a retiring manner — not 
a bold self-assertiveness that would shame a girl who has been 
out for more than several seasons. 



What a farce, that word ■• debutante" and all that it now im- 
plies! Were a debutante what was formerly meant by the term, 
some of her too frequent rudenesses might be excused upon the 

score of ine.xprrknrr. Hut the debutante of to-day is a young 
person whose summSr vacations haVe'been spent at fashionable 
watering-places. She is familiar with all the charms and possi- 
bilities of hops and yachting parties ; she knows all about alfresco 
entertainments. In fact, there is very little that this young per- 
son does not know. She is perfectly at home in the dance, at the 
supper table, on the stairs. Finally, she is sent back to school 
for the last time, and thence she emerges as a debutante. 

At her first large party, such a one distinguished herself by a 
piece of rudeness that will live forever in the memory of those 
who were its witnesses. Supper was served; the debutante, with 
her escort had gone dow n stairs, and had seated herself on the in- 
ner side of one of the numerous tables in the supper room. The 
other tables were filling up rapidly. The debutante seemed dis- 
turbed; she spoke anxiously to her escort. Another couple ap- 
peared and seated themselves opposite to the debutante, whose 
agitation at once became painfully conspicuous. » There," ex- 
claimed she, " just look at that! Now, if they don't come soon, 
they'll have no seat at all " — " they " evidently being some friends 
with whom the debutante desired to eat supper. "I told them 
to follow right after us; why don't they come? Oh, there they 
are now, in the door," and standing up, the debutante waved an 
agitated palm to her dilatory friends, who hastened to her. << Why 
didn't you come before? " demanded she in a loud tone of voice, 
» now we can't all sit together. I tried to save seats for you, but 
some one came right in and took them," looking daggers at the 
hapless young couple opposite her. Then there began a great 
shifting of chairs, and much more talk from the debutante, to an 
accompaniment of her own black looks. " I say," said the un- 
known young lady to her partner, who sat looking the personifi- 
cation of polite annoyance, " would you mind our trying to find 
another table? " " Indeed not, I'd much rather go," was his ready 
reply. " Very well then; let us get out of this," said the indig- 
nant maiden, rising with decision. The debutante looked re- 
lieved, her escort appeared profoundly annoyed, and one of the 
last comers began to expostulate, saying : '» Pray don't let us drive 
you away." '« Permit us to leave her in possession," said the un- 
known young lady, retiring with the air of a duchess; and the de- 
butante, the discourteous, uncouth, selfish debutante was alone 
in her glory as the rudest young woman who ever wore tulle and 
a V corsage trimmed with Valenciennes lace. 

G. T. Marsh, under the Palace Hotel, keeps a most artistic line of 
veritable Japanese curios. 



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Ill, 113, 116, 117, 119, 121 POST STREET. 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1890. 




1 we Obey no Wand but Pleasure's." — Tom Moore. 



SELDOM, if ever, have more sincerely appreciative audiences 
assembled at the Bush Street Theatre than those that greeted 
Sidney Rosenfeid's comedy A Possible Case, this week. Both play 
and players have made a hit. The play has more merit than 
many of the comedies now on the road. It is a clever piece of 
literary work. The lines are full of wit and sarcasm and are 
brief and pointed. The plot of A Possible Case is one of the most 
complicated upon which a play is based. It takes a clever man 
to construct such a play and get it in running order without 
bungling up. the incidents. In it Mr. Rosenfeld has shown him- 
self to be one of our coming dramatists. His delicate humor, 
clever satire, and keen appreciation of stage requirements are all 
clearly shown. The character-drawing is good. It is built of 
strong material and an ingenuity has been exercised in the gen- 
eral treatment and construction that calls for serious attention. 
Such directness of purpose and compactness of form are rarely 
seen in plays. Here we have a man married to two wives and a 
woman married to three men, and then both get married believ- 
ing their respective husbands and wives dead. The manner in 
which the dead return hale and hearty is cleverly worked out. 
There is not a hitch in the whole comedy, and the story is told in 
a simple way. Every word and sentence of Otto Brinckerhoff 
and Violet Mendoza, from beginning to end, has a direct revel- 
ance to the final catastrophe, and not only does every sentence 
contribute towards the action, but it serves in addition for the 
development of the character speaking it. A Possible Case has 
strength, novelty, and depth. Miss Helen Russell, as Violet 
Mendoza, displayed a degree of skill and intelligence that was 
fully appreciated, and her delineation of Violet's character was 
remarkable. She possesses youth, rare intelligence, a great per- 
sonal charm, and a sweet voice and expressive countenance, and 
these gifts upon the stage form an all-powerful combination. 
Belle Archer's Gladys was a bright, sparkling, natural piece of 
work. Mr. Kennedy is peculiarly fitted for the role of Otto 
Brinckerhoff, and created much amusement. He is a most de- 
lightful actor. Everything considered, his performance is an ex- 
cellent and artistic piece of work. Charles Dickson, as Allen 
Weeks, could not well be improved on. Edwin Belknap was a 
handsome, manly Dick Hertel. He looked the part of the young 
lover and acted it with good judgment. He is the son of D. P. 
Belknap, the well-known lawyer of this city. Mr. Belknap is an 
actor of much promise, and his rendition of his part in A Possible 
Case is among the best things in that entertainment. Herbert 
Archer is always good in such character parts as Signorde Vidas. 

* * • 

Balfe's well-known opera, Tlie Bohemian Girl, is essentially the 
most melodious of all grand operas, and, like all melodious operas, 
it is often sung. Emma Juch is superb as Arline, and although 
the audience which greeted her Monday night at the Baldwin 
was not a large one, it was appreciative to a degree. Juch is 
wholly different from any other Arline. She has a wonderful 
talent for displaying the nature of the character she portrays. 
This was noticeable in her Marguerite, her Mignon, and more so 
in her Arline. She has all the ways of a bright, merry girl of 
eighteen; she is always pert, joyful and full of life. She sings 
Balfe's pretty ballads with great expression, and never before did 
they sound so full of love and tenderness. Tagliapietra made a 
graceful Count Arnheim, and Hedmont appeared to good advan- 
tage as Thaddeus. His voice was more suited to the lighter arias 
of this role than anything he has as yet appeared in. Knight 
was an excellent Devilshoof, and Miss Macnichol sang the part 
of the Queen very effectively. 

# # # 

Tuesday evening, The Postillion was again sung to a good house, 
and Faust and Mignon were given on Wednesday and Thursday. 
William Tell was not given until Friday, when it was too late for 
mention in these columns. Martha will be sung at to-day's mati- 
nee, and Juch will sing Gilda in Rigoletto this evening. Mme. 
Juch's visit has been greatly appreciated here. She is an artist 
of rare merit. Commencing Monday evening, at the Baldwin 
Theatre, Mr. Bronson Howard's Shenandoah will receive its first 
presentation in this city. The story of Shenandoah is taken from 
events that occurred during the late Civil War in and around 
Washington and the Shenandoah Valley. There is nothing in the 
play to hurt the feelings of the most sensitive Southerner. The 
contesting parties are really represented in the comedy by two 
persons, a man and a woman who are in love; a young Northern 
West Point graduate, who becomes a Colonel in the Shenandoah 
campaign, and a young girl, who never rises to the point of im- 
pressive seriousness as a political figure, but is a very charming 
sweetheart. The villain of the play is a rebel, but Mr. Howard 
shows he was a villain before he was a rebel. The war has noth- 
ing to do with his hatred of the young Colonel. The other Con- 
federate officer in the play is the lover, first of all. There is little 
allusion in his political character except that conveyed by his 



gray uniform. The sale of seats has been the largest ever known 
at the Baldwin. Every seat for the opening night was sold last 
Tuesday night. 

# * * 

The new military melodrama, The Dandy Fifth, by Frank H. 
Gassaway, which had its first production at the Grand Opera 
House this week, is really a clever bit of work. Mr. Gassaway 
has made it very patriotic in places, and thus he is sure of stirring 
the souls of the audience; he has worked out several clever and 
original ideas, and his literary work is well done. The greatest 
fault of the play is that it lacks finish. The first act is really the 
best of the three. It contains an excellent bit of dialogue between 
Captain Dare (William Morris) and Phyllis Hamilton (Eleanor 
Barry). Mr. Gassaway has here shown his capabilities as a 
writer. His work is bright, fresh and witty. The climax to the 
first act is well worked out, and there is a good chance for an ex- 
cellent stage picture, but the actors here are at fault. The scene 
of the second act is laid in a camp of Union soldiers. The exploits 
with "Old Abe," the firing of the volley over his grave, the toss- 
ing of Cyrus Cinch in the blanket were all applauded. They are 
amusing scenes, to say the least, and at all events new to the 
stage. The death of little Taps, the drummer boy, is a real bit of 
pathetic work. It is the most realistic scene in the whole play, 
and there were very few in the audience who did not shed tears 
when the little fellow was borne to his grave in the General's 
cloak. The last act is decidedly weak. Taken as a whole, the 
play contains too much that is sad, and too little to lighten up 
the depressed spirits of the actors. The little romance which 
runs through the piece should be made more pronounced; as it is, 
it seems to be hidden. William Morris played Captain Dare in a 
manner which showed a very thoughtful study of the part. 
Lorimer Johnstone, as Captain Pickens, had the best male part in 
the piece, and he acted it very well, though somewhat stagey. 
George Osbourne, as Adirondack Joe, had a good character part, 
which, it is needless to say, he impersonated perfectly. Harry 
Bell, as Cyrus Cinch, must have enjoyed the tossing in the blan- 
ket. Miss Morris was pleasing and natural in the part of Dora 
Pickens, though somewhat lacking in dramatic force. Eleanor 
Barry was a charming Phyllis, and little Helen Henry, who 
played Taps, did excellently. The Golden Giant next week. 

# # » 

Dion Boucicault's old drama, Jessie Brown, was revived at the 
Alcazar this week, with Julia Stuart in the heroine's role. The 
old play still contains much of interest, and although it would 
not be a success if written for these times, it is amusing and en- 
tertaining. Julia Stuart, as Jessie Brown, has a good appearance, 
and she has acquired a good Scotch accent. Her dramatic work 
is creditable, but not excellent. Buckley was an ideal McGregor, 
and seemed quite at home in his kilts. Leo Cooper impersonated 
the Rajah. His work was better than that of any in the cast. 
Ethel Brandon was a sympathetic Amy Campbell, and Nellie 
Buckley filled the role of Alice with satisfaction. The Lights o' 
London is next week's attraction. 

# # * 

The production of The Bells of Corneville, by the Bohemian Am- 
ateur Opera Company, at the Bijou next Saturday night, promises 
to be one of the social events of the season. It will be for the 
benefit of St. Luke's Hospital, a most worthy charity. The mem- 
bers of the company have been rehearsing the opera very ear- 
nestly for the past six weeks, and as all of them have appeared 
successfully in public before, there is no danger of any failure. 
Miss Florence Tobin, who will appear as Serpolette, is a most 
vivacious young lady, blessed with many talents and a good 
voice. She will be remembered for her successful performance of 
Yum-Yum in The Mikado, and she has appeared as Ko-Ko, and 
as the Judge in A Trial by Jury. Miss Anna M. Wood will sing 
Germaine, Miss Opha Miller, Gertrude, and Miss Bessie Bunner, 
Manette. Mr. F. K. Tobin will appear as Henri, and Mr. Albert 
Tissot and Eugene A. Beauce, who sang in the first production of 
The Little Tycoon at the Grand Opera House, will appear as Gren- 
icheux and the Bailli. Dr. Arthur T. Regensburger, who has 
recently joined the company, will impersonate Gaspard, and Mr. 
R. Y. Cole is to be the Notary. An orchestra of twenty pieces 
from the Orchestral Union will assist, under the leadership of 
Sig. G. Saldierna. 

# » # 

Louis Harrison has had another successful week at the Califor- 
nia, despite the faults of The Pearl of Pekiiu Next week Roland 
Reed will appear in The Woman-Hater, an amusing comedy. 

# # # 

The proposed concert to be given by the musicians of this city, 
to raise a fund for the Karl Formes monument, should be patron- 
ized by all of our people who are lovers of the art of music. 
Formes, in his prime, was considered one of the greatest bassos 
in the world. He acquired a large fortune, but, like many musi- 
cians, loved his art better than gold, and he died a poor man. As 
he is the only great artist buried here, San Francisco ought to feel 
a pride in erecting a monument to his memory. Several of our 
most prominent society ladies have the movement well in hand, 
and this will be a guarantee that the concert will be an admirable 
one. 






Jan 8 



SAN FRANCISCO \K\vs LETTER, 



After ten years of popularity, the Tivoli will close and three 
week? shall have pawd before it re-opens. Uaoager deling in- 
tends decorating the Interior, and giving tfaehonse ■ general over- 
hauling;. The next time the publi< assemble there they will be 
greeted with a new drop curtain, for the present weak effort ol 
■ Hri<lal Party, 11 Is \" be shelved torevermore. The 
tig opera will be Lecooq'a ah Baba t which is spoken of in 

glowing terms. 

* • • 

Peter Robertson, who for the i>u>t seven years has been the 
dramatic critic of the ChronicU, resigned thai position last Mon- 
day an»l will eventually go Bast where he has been engaged for 
active literary work. While Mr. Robertson's work, has been ad- 
mired on the Pacific Coast, it has also been admired in the East, 
and his » Undertones" have made those beyond the Rockies re- 
gard hiru as a genius and a scholar. Mr. Robertson has always 
been regarded as a careful as well as an excellent critic, both of 
music and the drama. At present he holds the honorable posi- 
tion of President of the Bohemian Club, and is one of its earliest 
members. By Mr. Robertson's departure, the Chronicle loses one 
of its most valuable writers and Pacific Coast journalism an ear- 
! nest devotee. Mr. Arthur H. Barendt, who has been with the 
j iTironicle for some three or four years will succeed Mr. Robertson. 
* * • 
Nelson Decker passed through San Francisco last week en 
, route to New York L. R. Stockwell has gone East to get at- 
tractions for the Alcazar. The amateur dramatic clubs of this 

j city will give an entertainment at Irving Hall on February 14th, 
: under the management of Albert Marks. A prize will be given 
to the club doing the best work, which will be judged by mem- 
bers of the local press. 

SOCIETY TIPPLING. 



IT has ever been our aim, as a public journal, to " hold the mir- 
ror up to nature." and when occasion required, deal with the 
glaring evils of the day as a surgeon would use his probe on a 
lurking ill, and cut to cure. To the calm, thinking mind it must 
be apparent that there is a growing tendency among our young 
] people to flippancy of speech, familiarity of manner, and a low- 
ering of the standard of both male and female excellence. Several 
points might be more than touched upon with profit, but we have 
no space at this time to dwell upon them, desiring to say a word 
specially upon the habit of society tippling, which is gaining so 
firm a foothold in our upper circles. It is an open secret that the 
liquor habit, as it is called, exists to a marked degree among the 
classes where one would naturally least expect to find it. Every 
one in society knows of the cases where mothers of families have 
been for years subject to nervous attacks — fainting spells, mental 
prostration, etc. Equally well known are the habits of younger 
matrons, who indulge in periodical sprees, resulting in cris de 
nerfs of an aggravated character. Young girls are not exempt 
from the fashionable vice, for it is related that a prominent phy- 
sician having been called to attend one of our noted belles, who 
was suddenly attacked by hysteria, flatly told the young lady's 
mother that her daughter was under the influence of liquor. And 
still again the story goes that many a night the corridors of a 
leading hotel have re-echoed with the screams and laughter of a 
young girl, now married and gone, who was in the throes of 
(champagne) hysteria. 

Sad, painful and disgraceful as these examples are, it is not 
with them we deal, but the habit of over-indulgence at society en- 
tertainments. Whether it be from lack of mental ability to carry 
on a conversation, a lack of will to aid the hostess in entertaining 
her guests, or a desire to be «« manly," we know not. Possibly 
the heads of the youthful beaux of the period cannot stand 
copious draughts from the flowing bowl. Certain it is the young 
gentlemen find more attraction in the exhilarating sparkle of 
champagne than the bright eyes of the young debutantes, and the 
neglect of the latter in favor of the former has come to be a sub- 
ject of such general remark, it becomes the duty of the press to 
take it up for comment. 

THE MASCULINE MAID. 



THE funny idea of putting maids who wait at the dinner table 
in livery has been adopted, though it is hardly likely to be- 
come generally patronized, says an English weekly. The dress 
is usually of some dark livery cloth, green, brown or blue, as 
heraldic exigency decrees. The skirt is perfectly plain in front, 
with heavy plaits behind. Buttoned up close is a waistcoat of 
the cloth covered with fine crosswise lines of red braid, as on a 
footman's waistcoat. This and the cloth coat that comes down 
over the hips, and is cut away in front, are buttoned with metal 
livery buttons, crested or monogrammed. A high stiff white col- 
lar and cravat, stiff white cuffs, and tiny white cap, like a top- 
knot, complete this hybrid livery costume. Most girls would ob- 
ject to be played the fool with, and would give the necessary 
month's notice. 



M. B. Moraghan, in the California Market, sells the best oysters, 
and also the cheapest. 



BALDWIN THEATRE-OPERA SEASON. 

Mr. Al. KATIt*jt,LoMeeaad Proprietor I Alfred Uouvibk, Acting Mu.iaeer 
Leal Night! EMMA .urn urand English OPERA COMPANY, 
<i u.ur tha Direction uf rims. v.. Looks:) Saturday -Fa ewell Matiuee, 

THE FREISCHUTZI 
Saturday Evening— Farewell Performance. By Public Demand, 

CARMEN I 
[Juoh in .her wonderful Impersonation of Carmen.) Secure seats for tlio 
Farewell Performances. 
Monday, January 271U— Branson Howard's 

SHENANDOAH! 

Scats now on sale. 



NEW BUSH-STREET THEATRE. 

M. B. Leavitt. Lessee and Proprietor | 3. J. Qottlob ... Manager 

<„?f?I'.??. m T ,'£ da5 ' at - A " Assured Success of J. M. HILL'S UNION 
SQUAKE THEATRE COMPANY, in 

A POSSIBLE CASE! 

An Amusing Satirical Comedy, by Sydney Roseufeld. A Company of Ex- 
traordinary Merit. 
Usual Prices— Evenings, 25, 50, 75c, (1; Matinees, 25, 50, 75c. 



NEW CALIFORNIA THEATRE. 

Handsomest Theatre in the World. 
Mr. Al Hayman, Lessee and Proprietor [ Mr. Harry Mann .... 
Evening Prices— 25e, 50c, 75c, J1.00. All Reserved. 
Only Two Nights More. Rice & Dixey's Elaborate Production, 
PEARL OF PEKINI 
Introducing the Famous Comedian, LOUIS HARRISON, and 60 Artists 
Matinee Saturday Only. 
Monday , July 27th— ROLAND REED, in his greatest success, 

THE WOMAN HATER I 
Seats now on sale. 



GRAND OPERA HOUSE. 

Mag [tire. Rial & Osbourne Managers 

Every Evening this Week. Matiuee To-day at 2 P. M. Benefit lid Artillery 
Regiment. First production of Frank H. Gassaway's Original Military 
Comedy-Drama, 

THE DANDY FIFTH! 

Northern Georgia During Sherman's March to the Sea. The Guerrilla's 
Home. The Sharpshooter's Miss. Holding the Fort. The Pride of the 
Fifth The Lost Cause. The Blue and the Gray. 
Itlonday, January 37th— 

THE GOLDEN GIANT! 



ALCAZAR THEATRE. 

Wallenrod & Stockwell Managers 

This (Saturday) Evening, January 25th— Matinee To-day at 2. Received 
with Every Mark of Approval. JULIA STUART and Alcazar Theatre 
Company, in Dion Boucicault's Famous Military Play, 

JESSIE BROWN; or, The Relief of Lucknow I 
Great Battle Effects. New Scenery, and a cast of unusual excellence. 
Best Seats— 25c, 50c and 7 c. 
Monday, January 37th— 
LIGHTS O' LONDON I 

BIJOU OPERA HOUSE. 

SATURDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 1, 1890 

The Bohemian Amateur Bouffe Company 

Will produce, for the Benefit of ST. LUKE'S HOSPITAL, Planquette's 
Charming Opera, 

THE BELLS OF CORNEVILLEI 

The following are in the cast: Mies Florence Tobin, Miss Anna M. Wood 
Miss Opha Miller, Miss Bessie Bunner, Mr. F. K. Tobin, Mr. Albert Tissot, 
Dr. Arthur T. Regensburger, Mr. Eugene A. Beauee, Mr. R. Y. Cole (Pro, 
duced under the direction of Mr. Robert G. Mackay). Orchestra of twenty 
pieces from the Orchestral Union, under the leadership of Sig. G. Saldierna, 

TICKETS— Parquette, Dress Circle and Balcony, One Dollar; Gallery, 
Fifty Cents. For sale at Sherman & Clay's Music Store. 

IRVING HALL, 

139 Post Street January 29tn 

"SOIREE MUSICAL," 

GIVEN BY 

nun nvc :e . c. zeiss, 

ASSISTED BY 

MK. UOO TALBO, MR. KOBT. LLOYD, SENOR ARRILLAGA. 

TICKETS $1-00 

Secured at Sherman & Clay's, on Tuesday and Wednesday. 

^hVOLT OPERA HOUSE. 

Kreling Bros Proprietors and Managers 

Last Two Nights. Tremendous Hit ! 

FURIOSA! 
With its Spectacular Effects, Beautiful Melodies and Funny Situations. 
Grand Chorus aud Orchestra. 

N. B.— Iu order to make necessary alterations aud repairs, this house will 
be closed from Monday, January 27th, until further notice. 

gjj^- Our Popular Prices— 25c and 50c. 

FAMILIES LEAVING THE CITY. 

Furniture, Trunks, Pianos, Pictures, Carpets, stored and taken care of 
Having no rent to pay, we store goods low. Aavances made. Referencea 
dating back 21 years, given. 

H. WINDEL & CO., 310 Stockton Street. 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1890 



THE last dance of the Bachelors' Cotillion, which is to take 
place on February 14th, or St. Valentine's Day, glorious in 
youthful memory, is to be of surpassing brilliancy. The success 
of the club has been surprising, and though there have not been 
wanting croakers, who have prophesied for it death as each sea- 
son has ended, it has yet enough virility in it to insure the 
prophetic remark that the Bachelors' Cotillion will no doubt be in 
existence this time next year, despite the solemn assurance of 
Mr. Edward M. Greenway that this is " the last of it." The club 
would have undoubtedly gone to pieces had it not been for him. 
He has the organizing faculty, and what is more, the ability to 
make a club a success when it is once established. The secret of 
this is probably on account of his financial abilities. There is no 
disguising the fact that with the exception of a very few of our 
young society men, all are miserably poor, and what is worse, 
have so thoroughly imbued themselves with the idea that they 
are so great a necessity, that anything which is suggestive of 
spending a dollar for the entertainment of others is preposterous 
and outrageous. None realize this better than Greenway, except 
some few of our considerate matrons, who, rather than see their 
daughters without escorts at their boxes in the opera, present the 
impecunious man with this rather off-hand invitation: "Be 
at the door of the theatre on Monday night, and I'll 
take you to my box," and the poor, soulless wretch stands 
waiting in the doorway, arrayed in braided top-coat and mus- 
tache, till the grand dame sweeps in with her child, sweeps him 
into her train, and then brushes him into her box. This is the 
beau ideal of our society man. He is an exemplar of a type. To 
put this young man to any large expense would be ruination to 
any club; and yet this youth has a high stomach, though a low 
purse, and a still lower desire to expend any part thereof. It is 
to be questioned whether there is any social club of the high 
standing of the Bachelors' Cotillion where the dues are so phe- 
nomenally small, and the entertainment of such undiluted splen- 
dor. Think of $20 for the season, and six dances! Then it is 
not everybody who pays $20. And then the catering. The sup- 
pers are such as are given in but few private houses, and to this 
supper are generally brought a number of extra people who have 
never contributed a dime, and never would contribute to the 
club's sustenance, and whose appetites are Falstaffian. Even 
those who pay the full fee, $20, get unlimited champagne and a 
ball for a trifle over $3. When this is considered, and also the 
fact that a hungry horde, in addition to the regular paying mem- 
bers, generally attends with cheerful regularity the supper table, 
there must be given to Mr. Greenway a great deal of credit for 
his excellent financial management. 

People may turn up their noses as much as they like at a clas- 
sical education, and say as an acquisition it is useless, and to 
study it in these days is only time thrown away. It is pretty 
sure to be sour grapes when they do. The advamages of know- 
ing at least a little Latin are incalculable. For instance, Will, 
who was educated at Yale, w r as the only one who appreciated the 
ex-Professor's remark, lately, when, in reply to the lamentation 
of a well-known society lady, at the absence of her good husband 
at the Paris Exposition, he said: " You do not care, then, for a 
thoroughly country life." " I don't understand what you mean," 
replied the lady, and every one in the room regarded the ex- 
Professor with suspicious eyes. " I do like the country ever so 
much." " I only thought," answered the ex-Professor, as he 
took off his spectacles and wiped them, " I only thought that as 
you wished to have your husband back in the city, you preferred 
Iius in urbe." 

* * » 

" Who do you think will be the next Senator from Nevada?" 
George asked Dora, for want of something better to say, so as to 
throw stray listeners out of their calculations, for George and 
Dora were sitting on the stairs. •• Why, Frank, of course," said 
Dora. Just then two old dowagers, with wide open ears, came 
along and stood leaning against the banisters. "Ah, yes. I see," 
remarked George, purposely assuming the air of a Harvard 
"prof.," " you are like Alexander the Great." The dowagers, 
with disappointed faces, moved on. •' You don't mean Cameron ?" 
asked Dora, with a deprecating pout. " No. I mean that you 
want new lands to conquer." 

Some one asked Marye the other day why he never played 
billiards. " Eyeglasses get in the way ?" suggested an envious 
gentleman. "No, it's not that," said he, with one of those con- 
descending smiles of his, which gradually turn -from a visible 
sneer to an audible cough, and are known only to his intimate 
friends. " The fact is, when I first arrived from Cambridge, in '69, 
I used to play, but I soon gave it up. You see I grew weary of 
bearing people exclaim after every stroke I made, 'Too much 
English.' " 



Mr. Thomas Williams, better and more unfavorably known as 
Tom Williams, has added fresh honors to a name which he has 
already made illustrious, and still more endeared it to the minds 
of the canaille of this city by a cowardly and brutal attack upon 
the business manager of an evening paper. Mr. Williams cannot 
put forward the excuse, when he goes before a Judge and a jury, 
that he is an inoffensive citizen, who has been maliciously and 
unwantonly attacked and held up to ridicule by the press of this 
ciiy. Mr. Williams has for the past few years led a life which 
has been judiciously characterized as " sensational." He has 
figured upon the race tracks of this State in every garb but that 
of a saint. Only last summer he pummeled a man in Sacramento 
much smaller than himself, because he was called to account for 
some actions for which he did not have a host of admirers. His 
latest role has been that of an admirer of a big-mouthed dramatic 
lady, who has some sort of a reputation in these United States 
and because a paper was lucky enough to say that the mother of 
the big-mouthed young lady did not think it was conducive to 
good morals to live in a flat with this horse-jockeying ranchero 
he, forsooth, proceeded to prove that he was a very proper sort of 
young man to consort with women by battering in the head of 
the business manager of a newspaper, when his back was turned 
and when he had no chance to defend himself. There is only one 
excuse that can be offered for Mr. Tom Williams. It will proba- 
bly have some effect upon the jury, which shall have to deter- 
mine upon the advisability of sending him across the bay— the 
excuse is that he has been often in the society of that thing which 
goes under the name of E. Porter-Ashe. 

APROPOS of the present influenza scare, says a London paper 
it is affirmed to us that a gentleman, some ten years ago' 
caught a thirty-years-old influenza cold. Looking up, in the way 
of business, some legal documents which bore the date of 18-18— 
the year in which England was visited by a severe epidemic of 
this complaint, he had no sooner handled them than he was 
seized with influenza, resulting in his being laid aside for nearly 
a month. Infection had lain dormant during three decades in the 
old deeds, only actively developing upon disturbance. 

Shainwald, Buokbee & Co., Real Estate Agents, make a specialty 
of taking full charge of property for absentee owners. Houses rented 

In- ,o^ ecl f d ' real estate bou 8 ht and sol d «n commission. Office' 
40/-409 Montgomerv street. ' 



MOET & CHANDON 




OHAMPAGITI]. 



"WHITE SEAL," Rich and Dry. 
"BRUT IMPERIAL," 



ACKNOWLEDGED 

THE FINEST 



BRUT "WIH^nE 



IN THE WORLD. 



Sole Agents, 

Sherwood & Sherwood, 

212-214 Market Street, S. F. 

ESTABLISHED 1834. 

GEORGE MORROW & CO., 

DEALBRS IN 

T3iJ±ir j^istid a-zR/^iztsr. 

PRIVATE TRADE SOLICITED. 
39 Clay Street, - - - San Francisco. 

MILLS COLLEGE, 
Alameda 4 on my, 1'al. 

Spring Term opened JANUARY 9, 1S90. For full information address 

C. C. STRATTON, President. 



Jan 



BAN PE wvisco NEWS I ETTER. 



THE KAILKOADS. 



JB. WRIGHT, who la the Division Superintendent oftheCen 
, iral Psoiflo, from Port Cost* to rruekee, deserves great praise 
fox the manner in which ha has handled the blockade in the Sierra 
Kevada. The storm has been anprecedentedly severe, surpassing 
the cre.it one of Some few years ago, when the traffic over the 
mountain! WU disarranged for several 'lays. At the time of 
writing it was thought that the blockade would have been raised 
by Wednesday, or at the latest. Thursday, hut as reports were 
then heinp received "f a snow storm racing at Truekee, the rail- 
road people OOUld not give any very definite information, ami in 
consequence alt Beat-bound trains were canceled till such time as 
there was a break in the weather, and the rotary and steam plow 
Could clear the track. The difficulties that the railroad people had 
to contend with defies description. It can be imagined how deep 
the snow must have fallen when a gang of men had to be em- 
ployed to dig out the rotary and steam plow, which had been 
forced by eight engines into a snow drift some twenty-six feet in 
depth. The number of men that have been pressed into the 
service of digging snow in the Sierra Nevada is from 1,500 to 2,000, 
and their rate of pay is from $1 80 to $2 per day with board. 
Mr. Wright, when seen during the week, said: "It has been a 
most harassing time. Indeed, for the last four days I have not 
been home, and have not taken my boots off. I have been here 
night and day by the train dispatcher, giving orders as to 
what should be done." Some of the anxious travelers in the 
blockaded train seem to have taken some delight in their sur- 
roundings, and among them was young Mr. F. Tallant, of this 
city. He kept up the flagging spirits of his fellow-companions 
in trouble by issuing a daily paper called " The Snow," which he 
wrote out and passed through the Pullman. The advent of this 
little paper created a good deal of merriment, and as Mr. Tallant 
undertook the pleasing duty of writing cheering news as to the 
speedy raising of the blockade, the issue was looked for with 
greater interest than do our citizens for their daily paper. Col. 
Crocker, who left for the East, as was reported last week, has not 
yet managed to get out of California. The train which he was in 
got stalled at Sims, which is some forty-five miles north of Red- 
ding. Last Sunday and Monday this train was in a decidedly bad 
way. The firewood was beginning to give out, and provisions 
were running low. Colonel Crocker, however, supplied such of 
the passengers who were without means from his own private 
store, and men were sent on snow-shoes to pack food to the snow 
bound prisoners. A relief train, laden with wood, was sent to 
the aid of the stalled train, but was stuck in the snow. The track 
between Sims and Redding was represented as a sheet of ice. As- 
sistant Division Superintendent Pratt, who has been doing good 
work trying to keep the track open in the Siskeyou, has had a 
particularly trying time, but despite the fact that he has exposed 
himself to all weathers, he has been keeping well. 

The latest Government returns show that Canada's total rail- 
way mileage in operation is 12,163 miles, representing a capital of 
$727,180,000. Eight years ago, the Dominion Government, pre- 
sumably with a view to promoting railway developments, but in 
reality as a bait for securing votes, adopted a policy of voting a 
subsidy ranging from $3,200 to $6,400 per mile to every new rail- 
way enterprise, thereby securing strength in many of the hitherto 
doubtful counties through which these new roads have been pro- 
jected. Since the policy of subsidizing railways was inaugurated 
by the Dominion Government eight years ago, no less than 101 
companies have received grants in the shape of money or land. 
In all, fifty-eight of the companies have signed contracts for the 

construction of the roads, covering an aggregate distance of 2,252 
miles, the money subsidies, which amount to $9,261,107, and of 
this sum $5,738,455 had been paid up to November last. There 
are thirty-two companies, with a projected mileage of 715 miles, 
which have been granted aid to the extent of $2,892,500, but have 
not yet entered into any contract for the construction of the lines. 
Then, in the northwest, land grants to the amount of 19,787,744 
acres have been voted to eleven companies, having a mileage of 
2,711 miles. More than one-third of these land grants, or 6,880,- 
000 acres, has been allotted to the "Winnepeg and Hudson's Bay 
Railway for a projected distance of 650 miles, of which only forty 
miles have yet been built. 



The bad weather experienced upon the Central Pacific and the 
Oregon and California, has thrown a good deal of business in the 
way of the Atlantic and Pacific and the Sunset routes. If it were 
not for these two roads no mail could be sent out of California, as 
the postal authorities, on finding that the blockade could not be 
raised, dispatched letters East by the Los Angeles trains. 



Mr. Jennings of the World, with a Mr. Hobson, another of that 
paper's wrilters, left the train Monday night on snow-shoes. At 
Colfax he chartered a special engine, which brought him into Sacra- 
mento, where another engine was secured and connection was 
made with the train which was carrying Nellie Bly east, via the 
Atlantic and Pacific, she having left here on a special Tuesday 
morning. 




The Gem of German Table Waters! 



PURE, NATURAL, SPARKLING. 



Its richness iu NATURAL carlmuic gas; its delicious, cleau and pure 
acidulous taste; its mellowness and its readiness to assimilate with milk, 
white aud red wiue, with champagne, with whisky and brandy, renders it 
the 

Most Perfect of Table Waters. 

Ask your Wiue Merchant, Grocer or Druggist for it. 

Charles Meinecke & Co., 

Sole Agents Pacific Coast, 

314 Sacramento St, S, F. 




& 



MEN AND WOMEN. 

GOODYEAR RUBBER CO. 

R. H. PEASE, Jr.,)/ , 

' ' I Agents. 

S. M. RUNYON, \ 
577 and 579 Market St., 

SAN F«AK«'ISCO. 




HIGHLAND BRAND MILK ! 

THIS OIsTIi-X" 

Absolutely Pure Condensed Milk in the Market, 

A PERFECT SUBSTITUTE FOR 
FBESH MILK OK CREAM. 

THE BEST KNOWN FOOD FOR INFANTS. 

It contains no sugar or chemicals, but is simply pure cow's milk, 
and can be used the same as fresh milk for every purpose. 
For sale by all grocers and druggists. 

THE JOHN T. CUTTING CO., Sole Agents, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

MILLBRAE DAIRY, 

THE MODEL DAIRY OF CALIFORNIA. 

F. H. GREEN, Proprietor. C. H. TILTON, Manager. 

PURE COUNTRY MILK AND CREAM 

Produced from healthy cows, wholesome feed, and rich, pastures. Fresh 

from Millbrae, Sau Mateo County, twice daily. Delivery 

to all parts of the city. 

The farm and city departments are open to inspection at all times 

Office and Depof : MISSION AND NINTH STREETS, 

Branches: Second and Mission Streets. Streets. 



O-. W. OX-i^IR/IEC Sc CO., 
653 Market Street, 

FOR 

WALL PAPER, 

WINDOW SHADES, 

And CORNICE POLES. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1880 




PUGILISTIC— Jimmy Carroll, of Brooklyn, and Mike Lucie, 
of Philadelphia, met last Wednesday night at the Golden Gate 
Club for a $1,500 purse. Carroll won handsomely in seven rounds. 
The battle was supposed to be one of middle-weights, but Lucie, 
who was within weight, allowed his opponent to enter the ring 
at 162i pounds, or four and a half pounds into the heavy-weight 
class. " Carroll, contrary to expectations, showed himself to be 
equally as clever as Lucie, who, although he made a game and 
hard fight, was never in it. True enough, in the fifth round, Car- 
roll, being met by a straight left jab in one of his rushes, got 
weak-kneed and almost fell to the floor, but he recovered in a 
second, and was more careful when he resumed fighting. Carroll, 
who is an abstemious man and a conscientious trainer, owes his 
victory to those two qualities. They enabled him to get into such 
condition that the accidental counter that he received had but a 
momentary effect on him. In view of the fact that La Blanche 
bad such a hard time to do up Lucie, it is probable that he will 
put as many obstructions in the way of Carroll fighting him as 
he does in Bempsey's. 

The Directors of the California Athletic Club have wisely invited 
the sporting writers of the dailies to meet them on the 28th inst., 
and discuss the merits of the recent Murphy- Weir fight. In ad- 
dition to their display of incompetency in their reports of the 
Weir-Murphy battle, two or more of these writers have been so 
malicious as to stir up a rumor that Weir laid down for $5,000 
given him by Murphy's friends. The Belfast Spider was manly 
enough to meet such an accusation as best he could, by publishing 
a card in the Chronicle, denying it, and stating further that Mur- 
phy had whipped him fairly. That, however, is not what can 
be called conclusive proof as to the fairness of the fight, but it is 
a point to Weir's credit that he prefers making a manly confes- 
sion that Murphy bested him squarely, than to have whatever 
credit is due the latter, lessened by the suspicion of a fake. Weir 
is well satisfied to-day that he could have won the fight had he 
been in as good condition as his opponent. However, those re- 
porters who have started the selling-out proposition, should have 
the manliness to go before the club directors and prove their 
charges. Such accusations, true or untrue, hurt pugilism. If 
true, the fakirs should be tabooed from all the clubs; if not true, 
they prove an encouragement to fakes, as men who otherwise 
would fight on their merits, lose heart And fake, because they feel 
they will be accused of it anyway. If these writers, then, who 
cry fake and collusion, dare not come forward or, when they 
do, can show no other reason for shouting than to call attention 
to their scribbling, they should be the ones tabooed. 

Fred Bogan, who claims to have bested every bantam in the 
State excepting Dan Mahoney, wants a go at him. 

Peter Jackson is due in New York. He proposes to make a 
short tour in the East, and then come home again for a few 
months' rest. From Parson Davies it is learned that Peter has 
not been in the best of health lately. 

The C. A. C. have dropped all propositions to Sullivan. The 
latter, after promising Major McLaughlin he would meet Jackson 
for a $15,000 purse, now asks $25,000. The impression is he would 
want $35,000 before signing. It will be a good thing to let him 
wait awhile. John exaggerates the great longing we have to see 
him. In the meantime, before John Lawrence comes to reason- 
able terms, there is our own big Joe McAuliffe, who wants an- 
other contest with Jackson. Peter promised Joe a chance as soon 
as he would return from his continental tour, and as Joe has 
$5,000 backing, aside from a purse, Jackson might as well pick 
that up, en attendant. 

Slavin, the victor of Jem Smith, has refused to make a fight 
with McAuliffe, but wants to go Jackson or Sullivan. He is in 
too much of a hurry. Jackson had to wipe out McAuliffe first, 
so let Slavin do before he looks higher. 

Dempsey is better than he was last week, but nevertheless his 
fight with McCarthy has had to be postponed until February. 

Jim Corbett, who is in Portland, talks of his uncontrollable 
desire to fight Joe McAuliffe. What a thrashing Jimmy will get 
when he tries it ! 

Patsy Kerrigan, the Boston lightweight, has arrived here to 
fight Denny Needham. 

ATHLETIC— The Olympic Athletic Club intended to open their 
new grounds on February 22d, but the heavy rains have re- 
tarded the work on the cinder path. If the programme named 
for Washington's Birthday cannot be carried out, the grounds 
will not be opened until May 30th, when the P. C. A. A. A. will 
hold its annual meeting, and on July 4th the O .A. C will hold a 
grand midsummer meeting. 

Athletes, like other people, have for many weeks been victims 
of the weather, and training has been laid aside until some genial 
sunshine shall reach this desolate country. 

A cross country run in the vicinity of MilbraeorSan Mateo, by 
members of the 0. A. C. may take place to-morrow. The doubt 
will be decided by the clerk of the weather. 



BASEBALL.— Baseball affairs are unusually quiet here for this 
time of the year. The rains have prevented the players from 
playing, and the snow-bound trains leave the managers in a state 
of uncertainty as to whether contracts for men they sent East to 
be signed have been returned or not. None of the games arranged 
to be played at Central Park have yet taken place, and from 
present indications it looks as if they will have to be abandoned, 
even should it cease raining. It will take time to put the grounds 
in condition for good ball playing, as they have remained so long 
unused. The Saturday afternoon games to be played at the 
Haight street grounds by the Society clubs will commence as 
soon as the rain stops. A few hours' sun and wind will dry up 
the grounds. The Veteran Firemen and Associated Firemen will 
play a game of baseball at the Haight street grounds, for the bene- 
fit of their treasury, on February 9th, should it not rain on that 
day. Reports come from Stockton that money is being rapidly 
collected for the club next season. The President of the League 
is in receipt of several applications for the position of umpire, both 
here and from the East. Sheridan will doubtless remain here, 
although the salar}' is smaller than that paid umpires in the 
larger leagues. The season is longer and the duties less irksome 
and unpleasant than on the other side of the mountains. If an 
umpire is efficient and popular here, he is employed after the 
local season is over. 

YACHTING. — Commodore McDonough's new yacht was quietly 
launched on the 7tb. inst. Her owner contemplated inviting 
a few of his yachting friends to be present at the launch, but the 
bad weather prevented the plan from being carried out. Experi- 
enced yachtsmen who have seen the new craft pronounce her a 
beauty, and the handsomest yacht that has ever been seen in 
Californian waters. So far she has been seen to great disadvantage, 
presenting a great deal of faceboard, which will disappear when 
her ballast is all put in, and her furniture and equipment is on 
board. Her masts are stepped, rigging set up, work on her saloon 
and state-Tooms is being pushed ahead. It will be six weeks or 
two months before she is ready for her first cruise, depending upon 
the most uncertain condition of the weather. The new craft is 
for the present nameless, her owner having decided to fairly test 
her sailing qualities before the christening ceremony shall take 
place. Lurline has not been replanked yet; the weather has been 
unfit for stripping her. She may have some slight changes made 
in her stern. 

CRICKET. — The present year promises to be an active one 
amongst the supporters of the noble game. Oakland, Ala- 
meda and San Leandro each have a team. The Santa Rosa men 
are expected to take the field early. The men of Grass Valley 
are always enthusiastic when a game of cricket is to be played. 
Mr. Jordan, the captain of the Olympic Club, hopes to get a team 
from the ranks of that institution, and an eleven can always be 
got together in this city. If seven teams should take the field in 
this State, the revival would be welcomed by all lovers of healthy 
and spirited out-door pleasure. 



THE PORTUGUESE NAVY. 



IN view of the possibility of England being forced to come into 
collision with Portugal, it is worth while giving a few facts 
with regard to the Portuguese navy. At the close of last year the 
little kingdom possessed one ironclad, six corvettes, seven screw 
steamers and thirteen gunboats, the largest being the Vasco de 
Gama, which was built at Blackwall, London, in 1875. It is de- 
scribed as having a displacement of 3,480 tons, horse-power of 
3,600, and speed of about thirteen knots. It is plated with 8-inch 
armor, and carries two 2H-ton guns, one 4-ton and two 40-pound- 
ers. The total navy, including torpedo-boats, numbers thirty-five 
steamers, with 136 guns and 19,840 horse-power, manned by some 
3,000 officers and men. 

J^VOTJD OOXjIDS ! 

Wear Comfortable Woolen Underwear. 
M. J. FLAVIN & CO. 

Offer everything in this liue for MEN, YOUTHS. BOYS and CHILDREN iu 

t. I olHIN*. IMir.RHEUt, OVERWEAR, 

Of every description. The largest stock of warm woolen garments, and at 
prices as low as the bame can be purchased for on EARTH. 



Interior business solicited. Price lists free on application. Orders 
from the interior filled with care aud dispatch. Fall and Winter Catalogue 
now ready. Postoffice bos 1996. 

M. J. Flavin & Co., 

924= TO 928 ^AJSIKIIET STBBET, 
Through to 25 Ellis. 



I IS* 

■.' ' ' 

.i'v.: 






■ 91 



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CD 






3 
C 




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Jan. 25, 1890. 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



11 



THE RECEIVING HOSPITAL. 

THK Usamiuer has discovered that ihcre are policemen who arc 
brutes, and police surgeons who nre ditto; tlml it is not pleas- 
ant for a woman to be rattled over pavements of third-qnnlity 
pickerinpito in a prison van. with a Leoheroufl member of the 
Kearny direct ?-^aail as traveling companion; that the Receiving 
Hn«pital is not a boudoir, and the young surgeon hired to prac- 
tice on the patients at nothing a head and find him less url>ane 
than ^ir Moral) Mackenzie in the presence of the Empress Fred- 
erick. This, we believe, is what is called a "sensation." Rut 
why f Would it be sensational to learn that Hades is hot? Would 
it convulse the public with astonishment and indignation to dis- 
cover evidence that Buckley is dishonest? If a sick woman had 
been picked np tenderly by the policeman, laid gently in an am- 
bulance provided with all modern appliances for the alleviation of 
pain, conveyed with respectful care to a clean and airy Receiving 
Hospital, handed over to soft-handed, trained nurses of her own 
sex, put to bed between fresh sheets, and attended by a skilled, 
courteous and assiduous physician, there would have been a sen- 
sation worth talking about. It would have been more than a 
sensation — it would have been a miracle, for it would have been 
a series of effects without any discoverable cause. There is no 
reason why the Receiving Hospital should be other than it is, or 
why anybody should be surprised at its condition. It is as nat- 
ural in its surroundings as a toadstool in a swamp. Everything 
about the old City Hall is foul and rotten, the Receiving Hospital 
along with the rest. Tinkering here and there will not improve 
it. Nothing but radical measures will have any effect. If the 
city wants a satisfactory hospital for the prompt treatment of 
cases of emergency, the only way to get it is to abandon the old 
City Hall, rent suitable quarters outside, cut the institution en- 
tirely loose from the police, and put it into the hands of some 
reputable society, like the Polyclinic. As long as we let police- 
men insult patients, apprentice doctors experiment on them, and 
the putrid atmosphere of the old City Hall envelop them, we can 
have "exposures," if we care for such things, every week. 

THE COLONEL'S OMISSION. 



COLONEL ROBERT G. INGERSOLL has been appearing be- 
fore the New York Bar Association in the rule of moralist. 
He pleads for better treatment for the unappreciated criminal of 
low degree. •' As long as dishonorable success," says Colonel 
Ingersoll, " outranks honest effort; as long as society bows and 
cringes before great thieves, there will be little ones enough to fill 
the jails." An admirable sentiment, admirably expressed. , The 
great orator, perhaps wisely, left it to stand alone, without any 
corroborative examples. If any such examples had been wanted 
they could have been easily furnished. For instance, Colonel 
Ingersoll might have mentioned Stephen W. Dorsey, one of the 
" great thieves," " whose dishonorable success " has outranked 
honest effort to a conspicuous 'degree. Dorsey first stole public 
money through Star Route contracts, and using the capital thus 
acquired as a jimmy, he pried open the safe of the public domain 
and stole some hundreds of thousands of acres of land. At one 
time there seemed a chance of bringing this monumental scoun- 
drel to justice, but the brilliant talents of Colonel Ingersoll pre- 
vented a conviction. The efforts of the great advocate were re- 
warded by an interest in the stolen land to the value, as com- 
monly reported, of fifty thousand dollars a year, and nobody can 
say that the fee was too high. Of course Colonel Ingersoll was 
not personally blameworthy in this matter. He did only what 
any other lawyer would have been glad to do — in fact, he has put 
more conscience into his work than is common in his profession. 
But while he is reforming the relations between criminals and 
society, he might as well begin with the lawyers. 

"LES RELEVAILLES." 

— New Artotype Series.— Plate 31 

THROUGH the courtesy of Messrs. Gump we were enabled on 
December 7th to give an extended notice of the picture which 
represents the ceremony known as the ,( Churching of Women." 
The painter of this picture is Mdlle. Jeanne Rongier, of Paris, 
who has a reputation second to none among the world's great 
artists. Miss Rongier was born in Macon, France, and studied 
for some years with those celebrated masters, M. M. Harpignies 
and Luminals. She has been decorated with medals, and is now 
"Ex." Miss Rongier, it will be remembered, painted that ad- 
mirable picture, " Entering the Convent," which created so much 
stir in art circles some years ago, and which was purchased at a 
very high figure by Mrs. Glaus Spreckels. The picture under dis- 
cussion is one which cannot fail to find admirers, for it is so deli- 
cate in coloring and so full of feeling. The frail and delicate 
young woman, who has come to the church in the care of her 
mother, excites the tenderest sympathies. Hale youth and 
hearty old age, strength and weakness are here portrayed in a 
masterly way. It is a picture which would make an admirable 
present to some religious society, and as we in San Francisco have 
among us several good and devout Catholics, there should not be 
wanting some one to make a gift of it to the new Cathedral 
which is now being built on Van Ness avenue. 



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A Homeopathic Family Medicine Case should be in Every Household. 

Prices, from $6 to $45, including Book. 

BOERICKE & SCHRECK, 

Catalogue mailed free. 234 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

COLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION, 

806 Market Street (I'lielan Building). 

Gas Specialists. Originated the use of Pure Nitrous Oxide Gas for posi 
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in all cases. Thirty-five thousand refereuces. Established 1863. Indorsed 
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DR. CHARLES W. DECKER. 

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BANDMANN, NIELSEN & CO., • - - General Agents 
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n I UnQO don't pay; but send $1 00 at once for magnificent outfit of our 
Great New Stanley Book. If book aud terms not satisfactory we will re- 
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Main St., Richmond, Va. 




A NATURAL AND FRUITY WINE 

EM. MEYER & CO., 



Sole Agents Pacific Coast, 



413 and 415 Pine Street. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1890. 







MR. CLEMENTS MARKHAM'S life of John Davis is the first 
volume of a series devoted to the world's great explorers. If 
the succeeding volumes are as good as this one, the series will de- 
serve a place in every English library. Davis was an enterpris- 
ing and skillful seaman of Elizabethan days, who, besides such 
trifling matters as fighting the Spaniards and helping to open the 
Eastern trade, discovered what has been ever since the chief gate- 
way to the Polar world in Davis Straits, and by doing so swept 
away a whole mass of fictitious geography that had been a greater 
obstacle to exploration in this direction than even the northern 
ice. He was thus the pioneer of a long list of English explorers 
of the Arctic world. He rendered another great service to English 
commerce by his works on navigation and seamanship; for he 
was in the best sense of the word a scientific sailor. After suc- 
cessful voyages to the far North and through Magellan's Straits, 
he at last met his death in a brush with pirates in the Chinese 
seas. The adventurous career of Davis is much more interesting 
reading than are most of the sensational stories of the day. 

The London Spectator thus compares Lord Tennyson and Brown- 
ing: ■• In some respects the two greatest imaginative poets of our 
day are striking contrasts. Browning is careless and impatient 
in execution, Tennyson careful and elaborate. Browning is rough 
and ungainly, Tennyson smooth and stately. Browning trots or 
gallops; Tennyson walks or canters. Browning almost gasps out 
his meaning, omitting half the articles and particles which weave 
speech into a flexible texture; Tennyson touches and retouches 
the form till it is no less perfect, or even more perfect, than the 
thought or emotion to be expressed, so that the artistic work- 
manship sometimes attracts even more attention than the imagin- 
ative substance on which it is expended. Again, Tennyson 
studies either beauties or grace or majesty of form in almost all 
his poems; Browning, we might say, studies the neglect of these 
qualities, or, if that be exaggeration, at least ignores them alto- 
gether, and hews away right and left, like a pioneer in a jungle, 
instead of shaping anxiously and lovingly as a sculptor shapes 
his marble." 

Messrs. Blackwood have arranged for the publication in their 
magazine of a novel founded on events arising from the present 
state of armed tension between the Great European Powers. The 
plot has a foundation on a tragic incident which was scarcely al- 
lowed to pass beyond the knowledge ot the official circles under 
whose notice it fell; and the conditions of life on a fortified fron- 
tier line under a system of suspicion, surveillance and arbitrary 
despotism are full of novel and dramatic situations, which the au- 
thor, from personal knowledge, has been able to turn to full ac- 
count. 

Marshal MacMahon has completed his memoirs, says a writer 
in the London World, but I learn that the work is to be printed 
for private circulation only, and that only a very few copies will 
be issued. The Marshal is understood to have given a very full 
account of his experiences during the wars of 1859 and 1870, and 
he must have a great deal to tell which is both new and of much 
interest and importance. 



Two hundred and thirty trains daily pass the little house at 
MC-dan where Emile Zola pursues his literary labors; to this rural 
retreat Zola fled in 1S78 to escape the annoyance of the host of 
tourists who filled Paris at the time of th,e Exposition. The house 
he occupies was originally a peasant's cabin, and contained but 
one room besides the kitchen. The latter Zola has converted into 
a reception-room, and has added a circular hall and a large study. 

It has been proposed to make a book that would be indestruct- 
ible, by printing in gold or silver letters upon thin leaves of as- 
bestos, the binding to b<!of a thicker sheet of asbestos; neither time 
nor fire could have any effect upon such a volume. 

Two ladies in society are about to add their names to the list 
of authoresses, the Marchioness of Carmarthen and the Hon. Mrs. 
Arthur Henniker, both of whom are bringing out books shortly. 

Archibald Clavering Gunter has had bound for the White Czar, 
in Russia leather, a very handsome copy of " That Frenchman," 
which the Russian censor saw fit. not long ago, to taboo. 



The monograph on Robert Browning which will appear in due 
course in the "Great Writers " series will be written by Mr. Wil- 
liam Sharp. 



The shirt that makes a man feel saintlike and happy is the one 
bought frum J. W. Carmanv & Co., gent's furnishing goods, 25 Kear- 
ny street. 



MR. KENDAL'S IMAGINATION. 

IN a letter to a London friend Mr. Kendal tells a funny story. 
One evening his man produced from the box a pair of trowsers 
indispensable to the character in which he was about to appear. 
It was discovered that through careless packing the trowsers had 
a hideous crease down the front of the leg. Everything that 
could possibly be done at short notice, and with limited ap- 
pliances, was tried to remedy the defect, but with only partial 
success, and Mr. Kendal with a sick heart repaired to the stage. 
On the following morning he was waited upon by one of a long 
series of interviewers, who told him what a great sensation had 
been created amongst the gilded youth in the stalls by observing 
the new fashion in trowsers, and desirous of satisfying pub.ic 
curiosity, the reporter asked Mr. Kendal to tell him whether it 
was now the fashion in England to have a seam down the front 
of the trowsers' leg. Mr. Kendal explained the accidental cir- 
cumstance, and the interviewer went away decidedly crestfallen. 
The gilded youth were evidently dying for something new in 
trowsers seams, and the precedent hoped for proved illusory. 

— London Court Journal. 



APRIL 11, 1901, is now fixed as the "last day of this age;" it 
is not now, as it used to be, the end of the world. The in- 
genious prophet who gives us this comforting assurance bases his 
calculations on the prophecies of Daniel, and he works out his 
calculations in a cryptogram. It would take two or three col- 
umns to explain the matter, or to render it confused. 



This is the time when the harness and carriage furniture needs 
careful looking after, for the winter rains are exceedingly damaging 
to all leather goods; but if a man buys from Main & Winchester, at 
214-220 Battery street, he can be sure that he will receive an article 
which will not be easily tarnished. 



IB^IISriKIS- 



BANK OF CALIFORNIA, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Capital $3,000,000 

WM. ALVORD, President. 
Thomas Beown. Cashier | B. Mdeeat, Jr . . . Assistant Cashier 

AGENT8: 

NEW YORK— Agency of the Bank of California; BOSTON— Tremont 
National Bauk; CHICAGO— Union National Bank; ST. LOUIS— Boatman's 
Saving Bank ; NEW ZEALAND— The Bank of New Zealand. Correspondent 
in London— Messrs. N. M. Rothschild & Sons. Correspondents in India 
China, Japan and Australia, 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City, and Correspondents in all the 
principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast 

Letters of Credit issued, available in all parts of the world. Draw direct 
on New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis, New Orleans, Denver, Salt Lake 
Cincinnati, Portland, O., Los Angeles, London, Dublin, Paris, Berlin, Bremen' 
Hamburg, Frankfort-on-ttae-Main, Antwerp, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Stock- 
holm, Christiana, Locarno, Melbourne, Sydney, Auckland, Hongkong 
Shanghai, Yokohama, Genoa, and all cities in Italv and Switzerland. 

LONDON. PARIS AND AMERICAN BANK (Limited), 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter* Sts. 

Subscribed Capital. $2,500,000 \ Paid Up Capital 92,000,000 

Reserve Fund, $350,000, 

Head Office 58 Old Broad Street, London 

Agents— NEW YORK— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank 
(Ltd. ). No. 10 Wall St. , N Y. PARIS— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 Boule- 
vard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. Com- 
mercial and Travelers' Credits issued. DAVID CAHN, ) ., 

EUGENE MEYER, 1 Managers. 
C. Al tschul, Cashi er. 

THE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000 

Agency at New Yoek ...62 Wall Street 

Agency at Virginia, Nevada. 

London Bankers Union Bank of London (Limited) 

DIRECTORS: 

JAMES L. FLOOD President 

JNO. W. MACK A V, A. E. DAVIS, R. H. FOLLI8, J. F. BIGELOW. 

THE 6ERMAN SAVIN6S AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

No. 526 California Street, San Francisco. 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL AND RESERVE FUND % 1,085,000 00. 

Deposits July 1st, 1889 21.132,120 98. 

Officers— President, L. GOTTIG; Vice-President, EDW. KRUSE ; 
Secoud Vice-President, GEO. H. EGGERS ; Cashier, A. H. R. SCHMIDT ; 
Assistant Cashier, WM. HERRMANN ; Secretary, GEO. TOURNY. Board 
of Directors— L. Gottig, Chas. Meinecke, Edw. Kruse, George H. Eggers, N. 
Van Bergen, E. Meyer, O. Schoemaun, B. A. Becker. Attorneys, Jabboe, 
Harrison and Goodfellow. 

WELLS, FAR60 & COMPANY-BANKING DEPARTMENT. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,694,8C5.04 

DIRECTORS: 
Lloyd Tevis, President: Jno. J. Valentine, Vice-President; Leland Stan- 
ford, Chas. F. Crocker. J. C. Fargo, Oliver Eldridge, Wm. Norris, Geo. E. Gray 
and W. F. Goad. H. Wadswortn, Cashier. 
Receive Deposits, issues Letters of Credit, and transact a General Ban kin 
Business. 



Jan. 85, 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



i;; 




WHAT WOULD YE.— ffefaft Grow Smith. 

What would 

Ye who weep through nil the j-ears; 

What would ye, saddened hearts, 

Who see no shining darts 
Tierce the gray gloom, who will not see for tears? 

What would ye? 

Just for you on all the bills 
The sun is golden, and the golden air, 

Filled with rare sweetness, yields 

The perfume of the fields 
To you that wait — you loved beyond compare. 

What would ye? 

For your weeping there is sent 
To you, unsatisfied, 
A joy to none denied — 
The summer joy. Can ye not find content? 

O bounteous earth? a blessing is let fall 
Upon your children from the tender sky; 

A blessing that is peace. 

And bids their longing cease, 
For theirs is ligbt and love to satisfy. 



THE WORLD'S BATTLE (Unpublished).— Robert Browning. 

Thronging through the cloudrift, whose are they, the faces 
Faint revealed, yet sure divined, the famous ones of old? 

"What/* they smile, "our names, our deeds, so soon erases 
Time upon his tablet where Life's glory lies enrolled! 

"Was it for mere fool's play, make-believe, and mumming, 

So we battled it like men, not, boy-like, sulked and whined? 

Each of us heard clang God's 'Come! 'and each was coming; 
Soldiers all, to forward-face, not sneaks to lag behind! 

"How of the field's fortune? That concerned our Leader! 

Led, we struck our stroke, nor cared for doings left and 
Each as on his sole head, failer or succeeder, [right; 

Lay the blame or lit the praise; no care for cowards: tight." 

Then the cloudrift broadens, spanning earth that's under, 

Wide our world displays its worth, man's strife and strife's 
success 

All the good and beauty, under crowning wonder, 

Till my heart and soul applaud perfection, nothing less. 

A SIERRA SNOWFALL.— Charles Warren Stoddard. 

Blue dome above us, marvelous hive, 

Opaline, crystalline, all alive 

With the white bees of blessed Rita! 

If but these feathery flakes might store 
Honey of Hybla in lucent comb, 
Bee-like; if only the azure dome 
Might harbor and house them more and more, 
So that the seeker easily sees 
Ever the delicate, airy things 
Fluttering with invisible wings — 
Feathery flakes like bevies of bees — 
Would they better us then, I wonder? 
Would they even cover us under 
Canopies of immaculate white? 
Lodge us in little cells asunder — 
Separate cells of honeyed delight ! 



DAWN GLIMPSES.— Charles Lotin Hildreth. 



A faint sweet wind, cool as a woman's palm 
Upon a fevered forehead in the night, 

From far sea-bosomed isles of bloom and balm, 

Floats through the widening arch of orange light, 

Where yet the day-wings droop in slumbrous calm. 

There is a hush like that which falls between 

The measures of some music heard in dreams, 

While thrilling yet, the hungry ear will lean 
To hold the last delicious chord that seems 
To die down endless corridors unseen. 

Like some tall galleon from the lands of gold, 

Fading afar along the azure deep, 
The autumn moon wanes westward, white and cold, 

While o'er her wan and wasted visage creep 
The gleaming veils of morning, fold on fold. 



BjSl jstics. 



BANK OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

„ . „, Incorporated by Royal Charter. 

CAPITAL PAID UP '. ... $2,500,000 

RESERVE FUND 575,000 

Southeast comer California and Sansome Streets. 
Head Office-28 CORNHILL, London. 

Branches— Victoria. British Columbia; Portland, Oregon: Seattle and Tacoma. 
Washington. 

Sub-Branches— New Westminster. Vancouver. Nanalmo and Kamloops, British 
Columbia. 

This Bank transacts a General Banking Business. Accounts opened sub 
lect to Check, and Special Deposits received. Commercial Credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved Bills discounted and ad- 
vances made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates 
U R?S.!. , Heaa Office and Branches, and upon its Agents, as follows: 

TO:W YORK, CHICAGO and CANADA— Bank of Montreal; LIVERPOOL 
—North and South Wales Bank; SCOTLAND— British Linen Company; IRE- 
LAND— Bank of Ireland: MEXICO and SOUTH AMERICA— London Bank 
of Mexico and South America. CHINA aud JAPAN— Chartered Bank of 
India, Australia and China AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND— Bank of 
Austra asm, Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, English, Scottish and 
Australian Chartered Bank and National Bank of Australasia; DEMERARA 
and TRINIDAD (Westlndies)-Colonial Bank. 



THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK, 

N. W. Corner Sansome aud Basil Streets. 

Established 1870. u a. Depositary. 

ZfJo'ifW*" 3 " R) $7,500,00. 

SURPLUS. 600 000 

UNDIVIDED PROFITS 69^00 

8. G. MURPHY. President I E. D. MORGAN Cashier 

JAMES MOPFITT ...Vice-President | GEO. W. KLINE Ass't Cashier 

Directors— Geo. A. Low, N. Van Bergen, Jas. H. Jennings, George C. 
Perkins, James D. Phelaii, John A. Hooper, James M. Donahue, 8. G. Mur- 
phy, James Moffitt. 

Trausacts a general hacking business. Issues Commercial and Travelers' 
Credits. Buys aud Sells Exchange ou London, Dublin, Paris, the principal 
cities of Germany and the United States. Collections made and prompt 
returns rendered at market rates of exchange. 

Deposit Vaults Department, James H. Lynch, Manager. 
SAFES TO RENT AT FROM $5 TO $100 PER ANNUM. 

Families giviug up housekeeping or moving out of town can store their 
silverware aud other valuables in our vaults, tafe from dangers of every 
kind, at reasonable rates. 

THE ANGLO-CAUFORNIAN BANK. Limited. 

N. E. Corner Pine and Sansome Streets. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 1 Paid up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 | Reserve Fund 650,000 

Head Office— 3 Angel Court, London, E. C. 
Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligmau & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The Bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, aud issues letters of credit available throughout the 
world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange 
aud bullion. FRED. F. LOW, f -M a „ orra „ B 

IGN. STEINHART.i Managers. 
P. N. Lilienthal, Cashier. 

LONDON AND SAN FRANCISCO BANK, Limited. 

Capital and Reserve, $2,415,000. 

San Francisco Office, 424 California St. | London Office . ... 73 Lombard St>, E. C. 

Portland Branch, 48 First St. 

Manager, ARTHUR SCRIVENER; Assistant Manager, William Steel. 

LONDON BANKERS— Bank of England and London Joint Stock Bank. 
NEW YORK— Drexel, Morgan &. Co. BOSTON— Third National Bank. 

This Bank is prepared to transact all kinds of General Banking and Ex- 
change Business in London and San Francisco, and between said cities and 
all parts of the world. 

THE NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., 

OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS. Assets, $19,724,638.45. 

President, BENJAMIN P. STEVENS. | Vice-President, JOS. M. GIBBENS. 
HENRY K. FIELD, General Agent, 

324 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, 

SECURITY SAVINGS BANK. 

Guarantee Capital $300,000 

OFFICERS: 

President JEROME LINCOLN I Secretary S. L. ABBOT. Jr. 

Vice-President W. S. JONES I Attorney SIDNEY V. SMITH 

Loans made on Real Estate and other approved securities. 

OFFICE— No. 228 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 

THE CROCKER-WOOLWORTH NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

822 PINE STREET. 
PAID-UP CAPITAL $1,000,000. 

DIRECTORS : 
OHAS. F. CROCKER, | B. H. MILLER, Jk. 

R. C. WOOLWORTH President. 

W. E. BROWN Vice-President. 

WM. H. CROCKER Cashiee. 

HUMBOLDT SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

No. 18 Geary Street, San Francisco. 

Incorporated November 24, 1869. 

ADOLPH C. WEBER President I ERNST BRAND Secretary 

LOANS AT LOW RATES. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1890. 




IN a recent issue of the News Letter, shortly after the decision 
was rendered by the federal court in the case of Francoeur vs. 
Newhouse, we urged upon miners and mine-owners the neces- 
sity of effecting an organization to protect the interests of the in- 
dustry, and to fight the doctrine only lately advanced in relation 
to railroad land grants of 1864. That this advice was not un- 
heeded is evidenced by the fact that a few prominent mining men 
have already defrayed the cost of preparing a complete list of all 
mines situated upon the odd-numbered sections within this grant 
for which United States patents have been issued or applied for. 
The list now in their hands, which is but partially complete, 
shows that 587 patents have been granted. As there has been a 
great deal of activity in quart/, mining during the past few years, 
to complete the list of later applications will require some time. 
In the meanwhile the owners of those already known will be 
notified, and the work of organization will go steadily on. There 
has been no issue of importance before the public in the past, 
where the sentiment of the people has been so unanimous, for 
the reason that in no other branch of business is there so large a 
part of the community either directly or indirectly interested or 
concerned. The foundry men, machine shops and many mer- 
chants of this city will take an active part in the management of 
the new organization, and aid it financially and give it their 
moral support. The commercial world is quick to scent danger 
to trade, and its members recognize that an attack on an industry 
which furnishes employment directly to eighteen or twenty 
thousand men, and indirectly to as many more, is a matter of 
vital importance to themselves. 

?$? 

FURTHERMORE, many of our merchants and capitalists are 
owners or part owners in these mines. A great deal of min- 
ing is being carried on by them unknown to their' friends and 
bankers, so that the action now pending in the Federal Courts 
affects not merely the defendant Newhouse, but the interests of a 
very large portion of this community, and the best portion of it 
at that. The question at issue is simply this: Are the deeds or 
patents issued by the United States to mines in odd sections, 
where mines have been discovered since 1862, valid or not? It 
seems farcical that such an issue can arise at such a late date. 
Congress, in its grant of odd sections, excepted all mineral land 
except coal and iron, and for twenty-five years and more the 
grantees have stood by and allowed the miners to comply with 
the mining laws, have raised no objections when deeds have 
been issued by the Government on payment of the fees of $5 per 
acre required for mineral land, apparently acquiescing in the 
transaction; have seen the miner on the faith of this deed from 
the Government spend many millions of dollars in improvement, 
encouraging him to do so, so that they might increase their busi- 
ness from the results of his energy and enterprise, and then sud- 
denly say to him: ■< This is our land; you're a trespasser, and you 
must pay us what we deem proper or we will eject you." 
??* 

THAT the government has already been paid for the land is ad- 
mitted, but the title is disputed as carrying no rights which 
the corporation is bound to respect. The government, it is 
claimed, granted the land in 1862 and 1864, the grant working 
both ways in prtesenti when it is desired to confiscate a mine and 
non-prresenti when it is desirable to disclaim ownership. In the 
case of individuals, years of acquiescence and a peaceable posses- 
sion would be an effectual estoppel, and if the laws and the 
courts do not estop the attempt to oust the miner who has held a 
quiet and peaceable possession of property for twenty-five years, 
a period five times greater than|that recfuired under the statutes in 
the matter of other real property, there must be something radi- 
cally wrong somewhere. The heads of the great corporation to 
whom these lands were originally granted, cannot hope to estab- 
lish such an unjust doctrine and one so totally devoid of every 
principle in equity. They cannot afford to trifle with an in- 
dustry of such vital importance to the State as mining. It is not 
to be supposed that they are responsible for the animus which 
may control the actions of officials in their employ or blackmail- 
ing schemes of their grantees. The policy which they have lately 
maintained, is calculated to harmonize the many interests 
which tend to further the prosperity and welfare of their corpor- 
ation, and they will undoubtedly see the wisdom of adopting 
some means of settling a dispute which will create a serious an- 
tagonism among a class of people, which must be considered a 
prominent factor in this state. A change of policy in relation to 
mineral lands would be judicious at the present moment and a pub- 
lic declaration to the effect that there is no desire on the part of 
the corporation to deal arbitrarily with the owners of mining 
properties located within its territories. In a question where so 
much is involved on both sides, there is no room for the indul- 
gence of petty official spite; or actions of parties on the outside, 
which may be investigated by a desire for revenge, or inordinate 
greed. 



THE heavy rainfall of the season ensures a year of unbounded 
prosperity in the mining regions of California. A continuous 
supply of water power will enable quartz and placer mines to be 
worked at a light expense. While the rivers may run too high 
during the year to permit of operations being carried on at the 
bars and riffies, a period of low water will enable the fortunate 
prospector to reap a rich harvest of gold washed down from in- 
numerable new ledges, uncovered during the storm. The particu- 
lar branch of mining which should have benefited especially this 
year is hydraulicking. For the past five years this work has 
been stopped in all the principal gravel regions by the Courts. 
The loss to the State in the annual output of gold is heavy. Prior 
to 1880, the product of gold amounted to many millions in excess 
of the present annual yield. It was obtained almost entirely 
from gravel deposits. Quartz ledges were only worked subsequent 
to the decision enjoining the use of the giant. Were the decision 
modified or overturned, it is plain that the present annual produc- 
tion of the metal would be more than doubled, an evolution of 
good from evil, which will in a measure atone for injustice in the 
past to an industrious class of our population. The commission ap- 
pointed by the government to investigate the matter has completed 
its labors, and a report may be expected at any moment. It is to 
be hoped that its members will see their way clear to remove an 
incubus from mining, which has done much to retard the pros- 
perity of the State. 

lit 

THE case of the California Iron and Steel Company vs. Geo. W. 
Gibbs, et at., has not been dismissed from the calendar of the 
Superior Court, as is generally supposed. The trial has simply been 
postponed, pending negociations for a settlement of the difficul- 
ties. When G. W. Gibbs left the witness stand on the morning 
of the last day when the case came up, he did not return in the 
afternoon, and the attorneys for the companies were approached 
by Mr. Wilson, who represented the defendants, and a financial 
settlement was suggested. The proposition was taken under ad- 
visement, and the Company was subsequently advised that in 
view of the fact that the defendants, Geo. W. Gibbs, Egbert Jud- 
son and A. P. Hotaling, the defendants, were all wealthy men, 
and the Company poor, it .would be judicious to settle the mat- 
ter. The suit was eventually adjourned, and arrangements 
are now being carried out, under which a settlement can be ef- 
fected. 

Ml 

THIS course of action is very distasteful to many shareholders, 
who fail to recognize the wisdom of giving up a case which 
has involved an expenditure of much time and money. The cir- 
cumstances are so scandalous that nothing can be urged in ex- 
tenuation to justify any leniency on the part of the Directors. 
It has already been proven that dividends were paid for the pur- 
poses of floating stock at inflated figures, when they had never 
been earned. This in itself is a felony under the laws of the 
State. Six successive dividends of thirty cents per share were 
paid, while iron was being produced at $50 per" ton and sold at 
from $22.50 to $25, according to the sworn statement of the com- 
pany's officials. The stock was boomed as high as $37 to $39 per 
share, and many of the most prominent business men in town 
were caught by the specious statements of the management. 
Charles Webb Howard of the Spring Valley Water Company, was 
one of the heaviest sufferers, having purchased in open market 
over 80,000 shares of the company's stock. Within fifty days 
after the date of the last dividend, an assessment of $5 per share 
was levied, and subsequently two others of $1 per share. In ad- 
dition, this reckless Board of Directors finally attempted to get 
away with the whole property of the company by privately 
mortgaging it for $150,000, of which $89,000 was reported sold, 
taking all the bonds themselves with the exception of one, which 
by some inexplicable means drifted on the outside. This mort- 
gage they are now trying to foreclose, although the property 
owned by the corporation is estimated at $325,000. At the time 
the fifth and sixth dividends were declared, the books of the 
corporation show an indebtedness of $167,000. When number 
five was declared, a resolution is also recorded that Geo. W. Gibbs 
was appointed a committee to negotiate a loan of $50,000 for the 
benefit of the corporation. 

Hi 

THE present Directors are Charles Pace, R. E. Doyle, Wm. 
Murray, John J. Herr (representing Chas. Webb Howard) and 
Andrew Baird. 

Ml 

MAJOR W. H.H. Beauregard, Major Heuer and Major J. W. 
Powell, the commissioners appointed by the Federal Govern- 
ment to investigate the effect of debris from hydraulic mining on 
the navigable streams of the State and the Sacramento in particu- 
lar, have finished their report, which will be made public in a short 
time. Its tenor will probably be a general surprise to both sides, 
the News Letteh being in possession of reliable information that 
the Commission has been convinced that the filling up of the Sac- 
ramento cannot be attributed to an overflow of debris from the 
mines but is entirely due to natural causes. 



Jan- 85, IV90. 



s\\ FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



15 




'Hear the Trier What the *Icvll art thou,* 

'One that will j>l»y the devil, sir. with vou." 



WHY Dr. Healy and the undertaker should not have an ami- 
cable underMamline regarding the County Hospital cadavers, 
without exciting the animosity of some newspapers, I fail to see. 
The doctor makes nothing out of the patients living. His salary 
n just the same if the hospital be full or empty. Naturally, 
as a scientist and medical man of high standing, he is ambitious 
to get even with the remains. Our pet family physicians receive 
a commission from the druggist who makes up their prescriptions. 
If we pay seventy-live cents for a bottle of nastiness, we are mor- 
ally certain that twenty-five cents of that sum is handed over to 
the gentleman who has the health of our family in charge. Here 
the business stops. When the doctor has done his best work, he 
cannot with any delicacy recommend an undertaker. It would 
have an unpleasant air of collusion. His functions cease with 
the signing of the death certificate, the written proof of his handi- 
work. Where his interest ends, Dr. Healy's begins. The live 
patient is not worth a cent to Dr. Healy; the dead one represents 
a certain number of dollars. Go on, Doctor, never mind what the 
profession says. If you cannot, like your brother practitioners, 
make a commission from the druggist, hit the undertaker, and 
hit him hard. 

DR. HARRISON'S opinion of the best method of treating hys- 
teria in women has not met the concurrence of the majority 
of his fellow-practitioners. That person has got himself into a 
bad box, and may whistle for his hundred dollars a month, with- 
out any hope, however, of luring it back. While there are a few 
humane people about the City Hospital and Jail, the majority are 
a hardened lot, who have lost the faculty [of discriminating be- 
tween crime and misfortune. Every one who crosses the thresh- 
old of that pen in a policeman's charge is, in their eyes, a crim- 
inal. If he or she has fainted on the street, whisky is at the 
bottom of it. They view all the ills of humanity through a 
whisky bottle. They fail to understand the possibility of any 
attack arising from other causes than whisky. If a patient were 
brought in whose breath had the odor of new-mown hay, they 
would swear it was whisky. If a man has been run over and 
taken to the hospital for treatment, whisky did it. This halluci- 
nation, arising in part from the fact that the enforced inmates are 
haunted by visions of whisky denied them, is the explanation of 
much of this brutality, which the Examiner has so creditably ex- 
posed. And possibly the character of the female prisoners is 
responsible for Dr. Harrison's theory as to the most effective 
treatment of hysteria in women. 

AN evening paper suggests that an effective check on train rob- 
bery would be the offering of a reward by the express com- 
pany for the body of any brigand who tampered with the treasure 
box. This might work well. It would certainly give a zest to 
transcontinental travel, which it now lacks. Engineers, firemen 
and brakemen, before hauling out of a station, would see that 
their pieces were properly loaded, and would keep a keen look- 
out for game on the way. It would add new peril to the tramps' 
free ride excursions. When the genuine article grew scarce, the 
magnitude of the reward might induce the engineer to slow upon 
sighting a tramp, and as he approached the brake beam, pot him 
on suspicion. The fireman would testify that he was a desperate 
looking character, and that the only chance of saving the treasure 
box was shooting him on the spot, before he got the drop on the 
train men. At three thousand dollars a tramp, those hard-worked 
employe's might soon retire on a competency, and exchange 
train running for railway share speculation. 

THE Life-Saving Service investigation has resolved itself into 
this: If the surf is high the life-boat cannot be launched, 
while in smooth weather she will slip off like a charm. Mariners, 
in view of these facts, should keep away from the vicinity of the 
Life-boat Station, because if the ship goes ashore, they need not 
expect any assistance from that institution. When the sea is 
calm and the winds moderate, they may wreck themselves com- 
fortably anywhere along the beach, and if they make noise 
enough, the life-saving crew will come out and look at them, and 
perhaps launch the boat. The property of this Government is a 
sacred trust, and all risks of rubbing the paint off that serviceable 
craft, the life-boat, must be avoided. To keep that boon to sea- 
going humanity where she might be used at any time, would give 
her crew more trouble than the business is worth. 

WHEN an attorney is tried by a jury of his peers, to wit, the 
Bar Association, he need entertain no apprehension of the 
result. An attorney, in the eyes of his brother attorneys, can do 
no wrong. Wrong, brought to the very fountainhead of law, 
walks off smilingly, proving that palliation, and not justice, is 
the ruling principle of this boastful system. 

IF Nelly Bly had taken the C. P. route, she would have had to 
"bring her broom along," and do some sweeping at the snow- 
sheds. 



OH, clerk who holds the weather's strings, 
Look mercifully down on us, 
And bid at once, without delaj", 

The heavens tease to frown on us. 
Confound it, man, we are not ducks, 

For you can plainly see by us, 
That neither bauds or feet are webbed, 

That we are not amphibious. 
Our streets are made for things with wheels, 

To roll upon the cobbles, man, 
And not for ships, and boats with keels. 

And rafts and scows that wobble, man. 
This is not Venice, not at all, 

Go study your geography; 
Yet gutters once, are now canals, 

Upsetting our topography. 
Of rushing streams we like to tell 

In contemplations metrical, 
The rushing sewer is not — well, 

Is not, indeed, poetical. 
The nose of beauty should not be 

As lurid as a toper snout, 
'Tis all your fault who gives us rain 

Enough to drown a gopher out. 
To bark and wheeze and sniff all day, 

To beat the aspen's quivering — 
'Tis simply throwing life away, 

This coughing and this shivering. 
For mercy's sake, put in the plug, 

We're safe, we're sure of grain enough, 
And let us see your ugly mug 

Cry "cork it up, there's rain enough." 

THE time is approaching when the flying policeman .will be a 
target for the bullets of all good citizens unless the Commis- 
sioners check the esprit de brutaliti now pervading the force. The 
happy hour is nigh when the man with the star, who leans 
against a lamp post, will be set upon and clubbed sorely by 
every one who has the good of the city at heart, on suspicion that 
he is drunk and disorderly. There must be reprisal of some sort, 
and this is the most natural form that it should take. I hope to 
see the day when a band of law-abiding men will parade the 
streets, using a consumptive as a decoy for the brutal policeman. 
They will set their decoy on door steps, and bid him feign slum- 
ber. They will command him to sit on the curb to rest, and then 
when Officer Bludgeon comes along, and draws his club for a 
masterly hit, the regulators will jump him, and indent him. This 
is the crying necessity of the day, and we are bound to have it. 

HELENA came to the front this week as a sensation-breeder. 
Two cowhidings and two shooting scrapes all about the ladies, 
of course, is not a bad record for that remote city. One of the 
former cases was of an aggravated character. A mother, to check 
a young man's attentions to her daughter, lures him to her house, 
and flogs him herself in a bedroom. This way of administering 
corporal punishment would not work well in all cases. The vic- 
tim might turn on the executioner, and removing certain articles 
of clothing reverse her and the situation. The lady and the cow- 
hide is becoming altogether too frequent. While there are some 
wealthy citizens here who find amusement in being thrashed by 
fair ladies, the majority of humanity prefer that the aggrieved 
woman should entrust this task to her male relatives. Of course, 
our chivalric laws never punish a woman for any little exhibition 
of temper, directed into the cowhide channel. They get all the 
sympathy, and the male the sore back. 

THE young person (stout, with a dark mustache) who sells S. 
P. R. R. tickets at the foot of Market street, should mend his 
manners, or prepare himself to join the Examiner's collection of 
bears. There is no excuse for incivility on the part of those serv- 
ants, and this party is making a widely spread, and distinctly 
disagreeable reputation for unnecessary and outrageous rudeness. 
A traveler, unfortunate enough to deal with him, cannot reach in 
the window, pull him out, sit on him, mangle him, and chastise 
him in other ways, when the bell is ringing for the passengers to 
get aboard. No, he must grin and bear the " chin," which is not 
agreeable when he is paying well for his transportation. There 
is an urgent necessity for prompt and wholesome reprimand in 
this case. 

THE managers of those hotels affected by the British tourist 
are suffering severely from the snow blockade. " The remit- 
tances from my friends, you know, are jammed in those beastly 
mountains." This'is what those unfortunate men get every Sat- 
urday night in lieu of currency. But the confidence of the aver- 
age hotel man in the traveling Britisher is eternal. Not even the 
discovery of a leather hat-box filled with bricks will shake it. 
The merchant tailor — blessings on his innocent heart! — is like- 
wise a believer in "the friends at 'ome," and will cut, snip and 
try on, comforted by the assurances of his customer that the 
Regent-street artists cannot hold a candle to him. 

ASA FISK has escaped the grippe up to date. He is too busy 
putting it on his unfortunate clients to meddle with it himself. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1880. 




5UNBEAM5 




W 1 



The Counter Jumper's Carol. 

TITH my trusty shears in hand, 
All the live-long day I stand; 
Every lady's small command 

Me employs. 
When I am not '"'on the mash," 
"With my scissors do I slash, 
Or I hurl the mandate " Cash!" 

At small boys. 
But, when evening shades the vale. 
Then I very seldom fail 
In a borrowed swallow-tail 

To cavort. 
From my proud, distingue air, 
I might be a millionaire; 
In the waltz with damsels fair 

I disport. 
I appear, I'm sure, as well 
As the very richest swell; 
While my status none can tell 

Is a hoax. 
To some faded passe belle 
My affections I will sell; 
Then I'll marry her and dwell 
With her folks. 

" I want something inexpensive— for about a dollar. Those 

vases look nice. How much?" " Vases, miss? Er — yes, miss. 
They're marked sixty-nine cents, miss; but I'll just speak to the 
Hoof walker, and I have no doubt that we can let you have them for 
a dollar, miss." — Harper's Bazar. 

If ever we get the South American republics annexed, we can 

have a revolution or a war of secession every morning before break- 
fast. This might break up the old-soldier monopoly, but it would 
give the monthly magazine industry a great boom. — Puck. 

It is not hard to tell when winter's come, 

Because 'tis then ye plumber plucks his plum ; 
And at ye shining nickel doth he grab. 
Who makes ye muff, ye comforter, and tab. 

Mrs. Slatterly (to her servant) — Come right in here, Mary, and eat 

your supper with the family. Mary — No, thank'ee, muni; I only 
came here to earn my wages— not to be looked down on. — Puck, 

Lapel — What a delightful color Miss Brownlee managed to 
bring back from thecountry. Miss Askleigh — Yes, indeed; you could 
hardly see where her gloves ended if you didn't look at the buttons. 

— The Jury. 

De Snook— I don't see how these female walking-matches ever 

come to an end. De Forest— Why? "Because it's so disagreeable 
for a girl to acknowledge that she's on her last lap." — Time. 

Poetess— I have here a little poem— the only one I ever wrote, 

and Editor (grandly)— Keep it, my dear madam, keep it. 1 

would not deprive you of it for the world. 

Things one may safely depend on : 

An attack of the influenza; 
A call from the tax-collector; 
Seeing the drift of a snowstorm; 
Making echo answer. 

Clara — What in the world induced vou to buy more postage 

stamps? Queenic — Why, I went to the drug store to get some face 
powder, and who should be there but Charlie. 

The following was recently proposed at a shoemakers' banquet : 

" Mav we have all the women in the town to shoe, and all the men to 
boot." (Drunk with much acclamation). 

There is many a slip 'twixt the cup and the lip. 

But we've all had a nip of the new Russian grip. 

— Town Topics. 

NEWS LETTER POSTSCRIPTS. 

Kiralfy says his "spectacles" 

In Boston never "go" 
As in the other cities where 

He takes his burlesque show; 
But let each girl in gauzy tights 

Who gyrates there in glee 
Have spectacles upon her nose, 
And he will quickly see! 
' A funny conceit has just occurred to me.' 



' Whatisthat?" 
1 Why, that the bustle was never really fashionable, even in the hight 
of its popularity." " Why not?" " Because it was a back number," 

"Why are women so seldom employed in postoffices?" "I 

don't know. Why?" " Well, maybe it's because they have to have 
mail clerks there." 

A whisky straight is whisky's trait. 



Robert Ingersoll, the great lawyer and lecturer upon topics which 
are not generally discussed in polite society, is a great admirer of all 
things Californian. That great man said: "California bars fill me 
with supreme delight. Never shall I forget the pleasure I felt when 
I drank a cocktail at the Grand Central Wine Rooms, 16- 18 Third 
street. Never." 



SUNWARDS.— Chamber's Journal. 



Dazzling track of woven beams, 
Stretching to the further verge, 

Where the blue sky in blue sea seems 
Scarce perceptibly to merge, 

Art thou not a lustrous band 

Linking earth to wonderland? 

MR. GLADSTONE, in his wonted philosophical spirit, writing 
to a gentleman relative to spirits — a very seasonable theme — 
informs that individual that Professor Reynolds, experimenting 
on a full-grown rabbit, recently, with whisky twelve months old, 
poured down the throat of the animal a small teaspoonful, with 
the result that the spirit, containing so much fusel oil, killed the 
animal. 



Parisian lady, thorough French and Music Teacher, wishes en" 
gagement as resident or visiting governess, or would chaperon young 
lady; unexceptional city references. Address " Lady," News Letter. 

izL^STXiRj^isroiEj. 



$2,350,000. 




Insurance Company, 
capital $1,000,000, | assets 

D. J. STAPLES, President. 
ALPHETJS BULL, Vice-President. 



I WILLIAM J. BUTTON, Secretary. 
| B. FAYMONVILLE, Ass't Secretary. 



Agents in all prominent localities throughout the United States. 

THE STATE INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE COMPANY 

[ESTABLISHED 1871.] 
FURZE -A-ICsnD ZMZ^-ZRIItsnE. 

CAPITAL STOCK Paid Up $400,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICE 278 AND 220 HANSOME STREET, 

San Francisco, California. 

GEORGE L. BRANDER, CHAS. H. CUSHING, P. J. WHITE, 

President. Secretary. Vice-President. 

Boabd op Directors— D. Callaghan, P. J. White, J. M. Donahue, GEO. 

L. Brauder, E. L. Goldstein, L. Cunningham, M. Kane, Fisher Ames, Dr. 

C. F. Buckley, Dr. Wm. Jones, G. H. Wheatou, T. McMullin, H. H. Watson, 

H. Uimond, P. Bola 

THE SOUTH BRITISH 

FIRE AND MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEW ZEALAND. 

capital si 0.000.u00. 

Unlimited Liability of Shareholders. 

Office— 412 California Street, San Francisco. 

A. S. MURRAY, Manager. 
SAN FRANCISCO CITY DEPARTMENT: 
CONRAD & MAXWELL, Agent 

421 California Street. 

CALIFORNIA INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Organized February, 1861. 

CashCapital 5 600,000 00 

Assets. 1,300,000 00 

Net Surplus as regards Policyholders 820,000 00 

Losses Paid 3,500,000 00 

CITY DEPARTMENT: 

A. C. DONNELL, Manager, 

318 California Street, S. F. 

Department of the Pacific States and Territories. 

THE CITY OF LONDON FIRE INSURANCE CO. 

CAPITAL 510,000,000. | CASH ASSETS IN U. S . . . 5746,186.00 

SCOTTISH UNION AND NATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

CAPITAL 530,000,000 1 CASH ASSETS 516,407,072.46 

420 California Street, San Francisco, Cat. 
W. J. CALLINGHAM General Agent 

BRITISH AND FOREIGN MARINE INS. CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

CAPITAL 56,000,000 

AGENTS: 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

No. 316 California Street. San Francisco. 

AGGRE6ATE ASSETS, $46,000,000- 

London Assurance Corporation of London [Established by Royal 

Charter 1720.] 
Northern Assurance Company of London [Established 1836. ' 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool [Established 1867.] 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hartford, Conn. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 
S. E. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets, Safe Deposit Building. 



J.n. 86, 1 •'."'. 



s\\ PR VNCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



17 



IN a reccni number "f tin- Practitioner Dr. Jamison writes on tin- 
use of sodium ethylate in removing hairy moles on the face, 
rated in this way. The hairs were cut off as closely as 
possible with a very fine pair of scissors, and the mote was then 
painted over with sodium ethylate, a fine glass rod being used. 
When the mole had a Tarnished look the ethylate was gently 
rubbed in with the glass rod, to make it penetrate more deeply into 
the hair follicles. The mole bad quite a black look when the 
operation was over. A hard crust formed over it, which was nearly 
three weeks in becoming detached. When it came off the hairs 
were seen to be destroyed, and the surface of the mole had a 
smooth, somewhat cicatricial appearance, of a much lighter color 
than before; and this favorable condition continued until the mark 
was scarcely noticeable. 

A satisfactory color test for the selection of railway servants 

has been introduced by Mr. H. E. Lediard, of Carlisle, England, 
surgeon to the railway companies of that district. It is always 
best to n.ake a test of this kind realize, as nearly as possible, the 
actual conditions of the work; and Mr. Lediard's device consists 
of a revolving series of colored glasses lighted from behind by a 
flame, and tinted like the lamps of the signal boxes. Purple, 
mauve, green, yellow, blue, and red are the colors chosen, and the 
list includes all that are employed on railways. The effect of fog 
can be produced by smoke or ground glass in front of the colored 
panes. 

Mr. Edison, it is reported, is completing a machine which 

is to stereotype a newspaper by telegraph, says the London Pub- 
lic Opinion. If this invention becomes so much successfully ap- 
plied science, it will be possible to print the Times or the Pall Mall 
Gazette simultaneously in London, Manchester and Edinburgh, or 
in as many towns as the proprietors desire. It goes without say- 
ing that an invention by Edison is pretty certain to go out to the 
end aimed at. But this attempt to stereotype the plates of a news- 
paper by electricity is not a new idea in connection with the 
dream of a simultaneous publication in the big towns of the king- 
dom. 

Sulphur has a threefold action on india-rubber, according 

to the percentage introduced. If the percentage is a small one, 
say 5 per cent., and the mixture is vulcanized, the result is a soft, 
grey, elastic body, which is the common vulcanized rubber. If 
the percentage of sulphur is a medium one, say 25 per cent., the 
result is a semi-hard body of the consistency of leather, which 
also has its uses in the industrial arts. If the percentage of sul- 
phur is a great one, say 50 per cent., the result is a hard, black, 
pliable body, which is vulcanite or ebonite. — English Mechanic. 

The following statistics are published in Russia of trade be- 
tween Russia and China during the first eight months of the year 
1889. The trade shows a considerable decrease, being 2,307,251 
roubles of exports, against 3,362,114 roubles for the same period 
in 1888, and 6,228,559 roubles of imports into Russia, against 8,500,- 
000 roubles for 1888. The principal articles furnished by Russia 
to China are wool, cotton goods, leather and furs. China exports 
to Russia chiefly tea, valued at 4,525,000 roubles, and 51,626 rou- 
bles of burnt sugar. 

Mr. H. A. Chase, of England, has invented an electrical re- 
cording compass, by means of which owners of vessels could tell 
accurately at the end of a voyage what a ship has accomplished. 
The compass consists of two parts — the binnacle and the recorder. 
The binnacle contains a compass modified to suit requirements 
and place in the pilot-house, while the recording and course-di- 
recting apparatus is located aft in the main cabin, the two being 
connected by a wire cable. 

■ A project for the connection of the White Sea and Lake 

Onega, by means of a canal, is under official consideration at St. 
Petersburg. Its length would be 146 miles, and it would cost a 
little over a million sterling. It is one of the few schemes for 
quicker communication in Russia that has no strategetical aim 
connected with it. 

An ingenious inventor is trying to procure capital for run- 
ning an electrical magic lantern for casting or reflecting advertise- 
ments on the dark clouds that often hang low over a city. He 
states he has secured contracts from several large advertisers. 

THE London Court Journal is always supplying Californian 
news to its readers, the following of which is a specimen: 
» Mrs. Stanford, the well-known rich and amiable American lady, 
has made a very pretty present to her danghter-in-law — namely, 
a necklace of large diamonds, of a slight blue tinge, the cost of 
which was close upon twenty-three thousand pounds." 

Fine Arts.— The European collection of fine oil paintings * from 
Paris Salon, Munich Academy of Art and other art centers of 1889 
are now on exhibition and for sale at our Art Room, 581 and 583 Mar- 
ket street. S. & G. Gump. 



IJSTSTJIR-A.^CiE. 



FIRE. J&^JElTlSTtt. 

The Largest Assets of any Company West of New York State. 
Anglo-Nevada Assurance Corporation 

OF SAN FRANCI90O. 
Office, 315 Montgomery Street ami 410 I*lne Street. 



CAPITAL (Fully Paid) $2,000,000 

A3SETS 2,672,849 



LOUIS SLOSS President! 

WM. MACPONALD . Vice President | 



Z.P.CLARK Secretary 

J. B. LEVIrfON. Marine Secretary 



Exhibit October 1st, 1889. 

HOME MUTUAL INSURANCE COMPANY. 

276 Sanso.ne Street 

Losses p'd since organi'u.?3, 011, 525.77 I Reinsurance Reserve ? 265,052.20 

Assets October 1, 1889 . . . 815,748.87 Capital paid up, Gold . . . . 300,000 00 
Surplus for policy holders 801,954.83 | 

Net Surplus, over capital and all liabilities, October 1, 1889 246,902.62 

Fire Losses paid in lf8a ?159,086.70 

Fire Losses unpaid October 1, 1889 11,794.04 

President J. F. HOUGHTON I Secretary . CHARLES R. STORY 

Vice-President. . ..J. L. N. 8HEF ARD I General Agent R. H. MAGILL 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF CALIFORNIA. 

CAPITAL, Paid In Full $ 200,000.00 

ASSETS, December 31, 1888 450,086.70 

LOSSES Paid Since Organization 2,1 01 ,032.71 

JOHN H. WISE, President. 
Chas. A. Laton, Secretary. 

Principal Office 439 California Street, 

(Safe Deposit Building ). San Francisco, Cal. 

TRANSATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, OF HAMBURG. 

Capital $1,500,000.00 

Net Mr plus 408,400.27 

Assets January 1, 1889 1,311,809.84 

Invested in U.S B1 8,352.98 

GEO. MARCUS & CO., 
232 California Street, - - San Francisco, Cal. 

SJ^~ General Agents for the United States and Territories west of the 
Rocky Mountains. 

THAMES AND MERSEY MARINE INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) 

Of Liverpool, London and Manchester. 

Capital Subscribed $10,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 1,000,000 

Reserve Fund (in addition to Capital) 2,125,000 

Total Assets December 31, 1888 8,124,057.80 

WM. GREER HARRISON, Manager, 

305 California Street, San Francisco. 

THE SWISS MARINE ASSURANCE COMPANIES COMBINED. 

SWITZERLAND of Zurich— Capital, 5,000 000 Francs. HELVETIA of St. 
Gall— Capital, 10,000,000 Francs. BALOISE of Basle— Capital, 5,000,000 Francs. 
These three companies are liable jointly and severally for all losses that 
may be sustained. Losses made payable in all the principal seaports of the 
world. In the settlement of all claims under an English policy, these com- 
panies will strictly adhere to the conditions and customs adopted at Lloyds' 
and submit to English jurisdiction. HARRY W. SYZ, Agent, 410 California 
Btreet. 3an Francisco. 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT 

LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO. OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $9,260,000 

Cash Assets 2,764,875 

Cash Assets In United States 1 ,398,546 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., 

GENERAL AGENTS, 

316 California Street, San Francisco. 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London, England [Establs'd 1782.] 
American Fire Insurance Co. of New York [Estab. 1857.] 

BUTLER & BALDAN, Gen'l Agents for the Pacific Coast. 
413 California Street, San Francisco. 



NEVADA WAREHOUSE AND DOCK COMPANY. 

WAREHOUSES AND DOCKS POUT COSTA, California. 

Storage Capacity, 100,000 Tons. Regular Warehouse for San Francisco 
Produce Exchange Call Boar.d. 

These Warehouses are the largest on the Pacific Coast, and are furnished 
with the latest improvements for the rapid handling and storing of Grain. 
A mill attached, supplied with the best and newest machinery for cleaning 
foul and smutty wheat. , 

Money advanced at lowest rates of interest on Grain stored in Warehouses, 
Insurance effected at lowest rates iu first-class Companies, or Grain sold, if 
desired, at current rates. ,.■,„,.,- D , 

Office of the Company, 202 Sansome St., over the Anglo-California Bank. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, I860. 






THE small trade in real estate is beginning to feel the evil effects 
of the prevailing bad weather quite seriously, for some six 
weeks or over the mechanics, laborers and people generally who 
need fair weather for their work, have not been earning wages, 
the aggregate amount of money thus being withheld from circu- 
lation reaching a very large sum, and among the very first of the 
various branches of business to feel its withdrawal has been the 
real estate trade. Small buyers necessarily feel encouraged in 
making their ventures, especially if it be their first one, when a 
condition of general confidence prevails, and when money seems 
to be about freely, whereas they will hold on to their savings 
much more cautiously during supposedly hard times or similar 
unfavorable conditions. It goes, of course, without saying 
that with a return of dry weather the demand for mechanics and 
laborers of all kinds is sure to exceed the supply, and it will take 
but a few weeks at most to bring affairs back to their normal 
condition, and however gloomy matters may look momentarily, 
it does not appear as if anything is likely to be lost except the 
time spent in waiting for the rain to cease. So far as the com- 
plaints of the farming community, and their predictions of dam- 
age and consequent hard times are concerned, it is to be borne in 
mind that the farmer, as a rule, has proved himself peculiarly apt 
in forgetting bis predictions, and that they had but seldom been 
fulfilled. It is quite safe to say that so far the rain has been more 
a source of annoyance than of damage. 

The trade in valuable inside properties has not so far suffered 
from the weather to any great extent. That at least seems to be 
progressing undisturbed by rain or wind. And while the execu- 
tion of contemplated improvements has been delayed, the plan- 
ning and contracting for additional ones has proceeded uninter- 
ruptedly. Thus during the current week several contracts for 
expensive structures were closed, among them being one for a 
$60,000 building on the southwest corner of Powell and Ellis 
streets, a $30,000 one on the corner of Vallejo and Stockton 
streets, a $12,000 building on the east side of Devisadero, north 
of Clay street. J. L. Flood last week contracted for a mausoleum 
in Laurel Hill Cemetery, to cost $66,700. 

Report has it that the Masons contemplate selling their present 
temple, at the corner of Montgomery and Post streets, and to 
locate out near the New City Hall. The present building is not 
roomy enough to accommodate all the Lodges and Commanderies 
in the city, nor has it the convenience which nowadays are looked 
for in a first-class society building. Then, ever since the Post 
street cable road started to run, it has been found almost impos- 
sible to conduct funerals properly from the temple. As to the 
wisdom of the change there can be no doubt. The site of the 
present temple has become valuable enough to bring money suffi- 
cient for the purchase of a new location and leaving quite a sur- 
plus for the erection of the new building, There is a probability 
that it will be located on the corner of Jones and Golden Gate 
avenue. 

The week's regular budget of sales includes some interesting 
sales. They are: 68:9x137:6 on the south side of Bush street, 
137:6 feet west of Montgomery street; 137:6x128:6 on the north- 
east corner of Vallejo and Sansome streets; 25x137:6 on the east 
side of Taylor street, 112 :6 feet south of Ellis ; 43x60 on the south- 
east corner of Battery and Washington streets, improved with a 
new four-story building, $50,000. It is also reported that the 
Tammany Club has purchased the Peck residence, on the west 
line of Stockton street, 137:6 feet north of Sutter, and that the 
Club's quarters will be located there. 

South of Market street there were several heavy transactions. 
They include 25x160 on the north side, of Mission street, 175 feet 
east of Sixth street, $18,000; 25x85 on the north side of Howard 
street, 150 feet west of First; 50x85 on the west side of Eighth 
street, 125 feet north of Bryant; 80x73 on the east corner of Te- 
hama and Fourth streets. 

In the Mission the principal sale embraced 137 ;6x90 on the south- 
southwest corner of Valencia and Fifteenth street and 50x137:6 on 
Valencia street, adjoining a portion of the Woodward Estate. Other 
Mission sales were 30x122:0 on the east side of Howard street, 95 
feet south of Twentieth, and 50x160 on the east side of Valencia 
street, 160 feet south of Nineteenth, $20,000. 

In the Western Addition there were sales of 57:6x100 on the 
northeast corner of Page and Franklin streets; 75x106:3 on the 
east side of Lott, 100 feet south of Hayes, $6,000; 62:6x60 on the 
southeast corner of Sutter and Scott streets; 97:6x137:6 on the 
north side of Broadway, 137:6 feet west of Broderick street; 35- 
xl20 on the north side of Eddy street, 77:6 feet west of Franklin. 
Outside Land Block, No. 80, bounded by Fifteenth and Sixteenth 
avenues, and Lake and Clement streets, sold tor $30,000. 



The festivities which hail the birth of the New Year are now over 
and many a man thinks sadly of his wasted money, and regrets that 
hedid not spend it more carefully, especially as White, the Hatter, 
614 Commercial street, has laid in a splendid line of hats, which are 
in the latest fashion. 




THE COMPLETE CODE. 



Calfgraph Type Writer, 

Most Rapid and Latest Improved, 

Writing Machine Supplies. 
THE SAMUEL HILL COMPANY, 

Geueral Agents, 
39 Xew Montgomery Street 

Sax Francisco. 

K. 



For the use of Agents, Baukers, Brokers, Shippers, etc., etc., and the tele- 
graphing public. 

By W. J. SUTHERLAND. 

Published by EYKE AND SPOTTHWOODE, Her Majesty's Printers 
London, E. C; and E. & J. B. YOUNG & CO., Cooper Union, New York. 
Paris Agkncy— " Journal des Mines," 26 Rue Cambon. 

10 Draper's Gardens, E. C. 
Dear Sib: The " K. K. Code " is the best I have ever used. 

Faithfully yours. F. B. Bebr. 

DTJTTON & PARTRIDGE, 

214 California St., S. F., 

Agents for Pacific Coast. 

MATTHIAS GRAY CO, 

206 Post Street, 

General Agents for the Celebrated 

STEINWAY & SONS' PIANOS ! 

(the best in the world). 
Ernest Gabler Pianos, 

Kranich &. Bach Pianos, 
C. Roenisch Pianos, 

C. D. Pease & Co.'s Pianos. 

PARKE & LACY CO., 

21 and 23 FREMONT STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MINING, WOOD AND IKON WORKING MACHINERY. 

ENGINES, BOILERS, STEAM PUMPS, 
BELTING, OIL8 AND SUPPLIES. 

A. LUSK & CO., 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Packers of the following celebrated brands: 
A. LUSK BEAR BRAND, 

J. LUSK CANNING COMPANY, 

SAN LORENZO PACKING CO 

OCCIDENTAL HOTEL, 

San Francisco. 

-A. (3TTIET HOME, 

CENTRALLY LOCATED, 

FOR THOSE WHO APPRECIATE COMFORT AND ATTENTION. 

WM. B. HOOPER. Manager. 



J3u^ your 
&/l\ *~* LIGHT 

^"FIXTURES 

P DIRECT FROMTHE 
MANUFACTURERS 

rHOMAS DAY & C0.ua 

JuTrERgrT 

SAN FRANCISCO OAlJ 




Jan. 



SAN PR VNCISCO NEWS I.KTTKR. 



19 



THE BOURSE AND UNDERWRITER. 

«. BtkHT) January 26, 1800. 

TUB insurance world i» not particularly brisk Ihla week. State- 
ments have all ban submitted and then is a lull after the 
■torm of Bguring incident to the preparation oi the Coniroisslon- 
port. The dullness, too, i> Intensified by the absence of 
KaMcrn and HoftbWMtern mail, dealing with which forms so 
much of the work of a San Francisco office, San Francisco is 
the renter of a huge territory; the number of agencies importing 
here la enormous. Almost every town in the Pacific Coast States 
has its agent*, ami all write at least once a week to the head 
agency — some of them once a day. And it is no joke, handling 
so great a correspondence, which has alt to be attended to in de- 
tail, and by some one thoroughly competent and reliable. There 
are fine points to be decided on the spur of the moment, when the 
Secretary or General Agent has to place himself in the position of 
the writer, many hundred miles away and decide for him what 
to do. There are people who imagine the insurance business is 
Utterly lacking in complexity. Let them try it. They will 
find themselves as much at sea as though starting to set type. 
The lull has been taken advantage of pretty generally by clerks 
and officials to lie up with la grippe, which is very prevalent 
around California and Sansome streets. 

1 The locals have all filed their statements with the exception of 
he Commercial, Oakland Home and Alta. The State Investment 
bas been quite lucky, having increased both assets and surplus, 
the former being $547,286 against $534,427 in 1888, and the latter 
$3,707 against $3,026. The Company's losses were $155,111 
against $110,337, and its income $251,027 against $240,837, the 
previous year. This is an excellent showing for this Company, 
and the officials deserve congratulation. Had the year been nor- 
mal this Company would have made quite a handsome sum of 
money. 

The Home Mutual has suffered some in surplus and assets, but 
both former and latter are sufficiently large to satisfy the majority 
of people that they are doing business with one of the big insti- 
tutions of the State. This company's assets are now $821,517; 
its surplus, $244,884. Its total income is $389,971, against $371,- 
107 in 1888, of which $345,120 was derived from premiums. The 
losses were $192,375, against $173,178 the previous year. The 
sum. of $36,000 was paid in dividends to stockholders. This com- 
pany's business, directed by President Houghton, Secretary Story 
and General Agent Magill, is in the best possible condition, and 
ought to yield a big profit the coming year. 

The Sun's assets are $515,620, and its surplus $32,637. Last 
year the former stood, $550,856, and the latter $63,872— rather a 
falling off. The company's income was $288,487, against $300,- 
300 the previous year; and the losses were $193,324, against $158,- 
172 in 1888. So the Sun hardly shines so lustrously as it did 
twelve months ago. But its assets are plentiful, and the security 
is about twenty times better than that offered by some of the 
small-fry Eastern companies circulating round this State after 
business. 

It is not yet possible to determine the extent of the Coast loss 
ratio. It is going to be very heavy, though the volume of prem- 
iums has been unusually large. 

Local companies are very indignant over the arrival of two 
emissaries of the Ohio Insurance Commissioner, detailed by that 
functionary to examine into the condition of our Caiifornian 
companies, at the rate of $75 a day. The names of the emissaries 
are B. F. Reinmund and D. E. Bushnell, and they have already 
examined the Sun and the California. They have rather a nice 
thing of it, for their duties are really nothing to speak of, consist- 
ing in looking over the securities and examining the statements 
of the companies. They perform exactly the same functions that 
Commissioner Wadsworth, and a certificate from him would be 
equally as good as one from them. The companies have to sub- 
mit; if they refuse the Commissioner simply cancels their certifi- 
cate. The examiners claim they keep all the money paid them by 
the companies, but of course this is nonsense. Each of the locals 
entered in Ohio will have to pay these men a total of about $450 
to $500 each. Outside talk about the necessity of examining locals 
after so many severe losses, is that these gentlemen justify their 
descent on the ground that George A. Knight, ex-Insurance Com- 
missioner of this State, examined the Citizen's and Amazon, and 
charged them $500 each for half a day's work. There is nothing 
for this sort of thing but submission. 

Secretary C. P. Stringer, of the South British Insurance Com- 
pany, leaves on Tuesday next to take the position of Assistant 
Manager of the Company's branch at Capetown, Cape of Good 
Hope. Mr. Stringer, though a young man, is among the most 
competent underwriters in the city, and by his quiet and unas- 
suming manners and invariable courtesy has won many friends. 
During Mr. Stringer's connection with the Company its business 
has grown amazingly, and bids fair to equal the business of some 
of the other big foreign companies. 

Marine business so far this year has been exceedingly bad. The 
coast trade has apparently dwindled to nothing. There are now 
about eighty craft, from schooner to ship, up the Oakland creek, 
and they are packed so tight that the consequences in case of fire 
would be terribly disastrous. 



Msnnger Still-nan. of the Compact, has been visiting the local 
agents at Sacramento. He appears to have not had a superfluity 
ol success with them, as they gave him to understand that they 
were In the insurance business for coin. The company or agent 
paying highest commission or salary got the risks. 

The Crocker-Woolworth National Bank, according to its annual 
report, had an excellent year in 1880. The net earnings were 
$128,467, which, with profit and loss credit of December 31, 1888, 
make a total of $220,458; $75,000 has been carried to surplus and 
$.so,oiin paid in dividends, leaving a profit and loss credit Decem- 
ber31, 1889, of $65,458. The real profits of the institution since 
organization as a national bank are $385,458. Such figures speak 
volumes for the financial ability of President Woohvorth and 
Cashier W. H. Crocker. 

The California Savings Bank of San Diego has just been incor- 
porated, with a capital stock of $250,000. 

The First National Bank of Stockton has reelected its old board 
of directors and general officers. 

The California Insurance Company paid a dividend of three per 
cent, for the quarter ending December 31st on Monday last. 

Al. Geberding ought to make an excellent Bank Commissioner, 
and Mr. Thompson an executive officer, for the new savings 
bank. 

At the annual meeting of the San Francisco Gas Company 
statements were read showing a profitable year. The old board 
of directors was reelected. Secretary. 



S. F. News Letter will be seiitweekly to auyaddress in the United States 
for $1.25 for 3 mouths, $2.50 for 6 months, or $5 for 12 months. The subscrip- 
tion for the Continent, Great Britain and the Colonies is: 3 mouths, $1.50; 
6 months, $3; 12 months, $6. All subscriptions are payable in advance, and 
checks and P. O. O.'s should be made payable to Publisher S. F. News 
Letter, Flood Building, Marketstreet, S. F. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

People's Home Savings Bank, 
805 Market Street, corner of Fourth Street. 
For the half year ending December 31 , 1889, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five and fifty-two hundredths (5.52) on term deposits, and four 
and sixty hundredths (4.60) on ordinary deposits, for the entire term of de- 
posit, and free of all taxes, payable on and after January 2, 1890. 
P. S. PORN, Acting Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The California Savings and Loan Society, 
Corner of Powell and Eddy Streets. 
For the half year ending Pecember 31, 1889, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of five and fifty eight hundredths (5 58-100) per cent, per annum on 
Term Deposits, and four and sixty-five hundredths (4 65 100) per eeut. per 
annum ou Ordinary Deposits, free of tax, and payable on and after TH URS- 
DAY, January 2, 1890. 

VERNON CAMPBELL, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society, 

619 Clay Street. 

For tne half year ending Pecember 31, 1889, a dividend has been declared 

at the rate of five and one-tenth (5 1-10) per cent, per annum, ou all deposits, 

free of taxes, and payable on and after THURSDAY, January 2, 1890. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Office of the Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 
N. E. Corner Montgomery and Post Sts., 

San Francisco, January 2, 1890. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Pirectors of this Society, held this 
day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of 1% per cent, per annum on 
all deposits for the six months ending Pecember 31, lb89, free from all taxes, 
and pavable from and after this date. 

R. J. TOBIN, Secretary. 

"DIVIDEND NOTICE. _ 

Hawaiian Commercial and Sugar Company. 

Dividend No. 24 (Thirty Cents per share) of the Hawaiian Commereia 
a : nd Sugar Company, will be payable at the office of the Company, 32T 
Market street, on and after SATURDAY, February 1, 1890. Transfer books 
will close Saturday, January 25th, 1890, at 12 o'clock m. 

E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Oceanic Steamship Company- 
Dividend No. 57 (one dollar per share) of the Oceanic Steamship Company 
will be payable at the office of the Company, 327 Market street, on and after 
SATURDAY, February 1, 1890. Transfer books will close Saturday, January 
25, 1890, at 12 o'clock m. E. H. SHELPON, Secretary 

ANNUAL MEETING. 

Oceanic Steamship Company. 
The regular annual meeting of stockholders of the Oceanic Steamship 
Company will be held at the office of the Company, 3j7 Market street, San 
Francisco, California, on 

Tuesday, the 21st day of January, 1890, at the hour of 11 o'clock A. M., 
for the purpose of e'eeting a Board of Directors to serve for the ensuing 
year and the transaction of such otber business as may come before the 
meeting. Transfer books will close on Wedne-d«y, January ftth, at 3 o'clock 
P. M , B E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

The annual meeting of stockholders of the Oceanic Steamship Company 
is postponed till WEDNESDAY, January 29, 1890. at 11 o'clock a.h. 

r * E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1S90. 



OUR BENEDICTS. 

ONE of the features of her society, of which San Francisco is 
pardonably proud, is her Benedicts. Be it well understood 
that we do not mean by this all the long list of married men 
who adorn our social life, but the features of society, whether in 
the ballroom, at the festive board, or in club life, those whose 
names are prominent at every entertainment, whose position by 
reason of wealth or cultivation entitle them to special notice in 
an article of this kind. Ranking them, not by age but by wealth, 
Fred Sharon undoubtedly stands first. The old adage runs, " It 
is better to be born lucky than rich," bat in these days of luxury 
and unlimited creature comfort, who will agree with the old saw? 
Wealth is the power that moves the world along, and so to be a 
handsome, happy young millionaire is surely an enviable lot, and 
when to this may be added a handsome wife and lovely son, sure- 
ly Fred fills the role of a well-contented benedict. Young Sharon 
is worthy of the gifts a kind Providence has given him. By na- 
ture essentially a gentleman, his tastes are refined, his manners 
courteous, his mind cultivated. Having no necessity to work for 
his living, he is able to gratify his tastes in the luxurious paths 
of social life to the utmost. A keen judge of fine arts, a lover of 
music, an admirer of the good things of life in general, he is a de- 
lightful member of our best society, and a good type of a true 
American. 

Another rich young benedict whose tastes are of the refined or- 
der, and whose wealth gives him the power to follow them out 
to the fullest extent, is Jack Parrott. Mr. Parrott's craze is mu- 
sic, and he is devoting his time at present to a thorough study of 
the German school, living abroad for the purpose. He has al- 
ready composed one or two works of merit, and local critics are 
unstinted in their praise. .Tack is also a thorough gentleman, and 
one of whom our society feels proud. Another benedict of mark- 
ed musical tastes, who ranks high as a composer of merit, is Joe 
Redding. A benedict who ranks both the former named gentle- 
men in point of years, though still among those called young, is 
Louis Haggin, who is equally with the others a gentleman of re- 
finement and culture. He is of a more reserved mold, though, 
and of a retiring disposition. Having received his education at 
a foreign college, he has ever retained a predilection for the hab- 
its and customs he then imbibed. His beautiful, talented wife 
spends much of her time abroad, and therefore it seems but nat- 
ural his steps should follow in her direction, consequently we do 
not see as much of him socially as his friends would wish. Per- 
haps in no large city of our broad Union are there a greater num- 
ber of what may be termed young society men, who, having mar- 
ried early in life, are shining lights as benedicts, and San Francis- 
co points with pride to Will Crocker as being up to the mark in 
all the requirements of that somewhat exacting role. Devoted, 
indulgent and domestic, what more can one ask of a married man? 

Another young benedict of unexceptionable character is Will 
Tevis. To be sure, both these gentlemen are blessed with charm- 
ing wives. But so are many others who do not, apparently, val- 
ue them and the delight of a home fireside to the extent that either 
of these gentlemen do. Still another happy young benedict of 
society is W. Mayo Newhall, whose aesthetic taste has reveled in 
embellishing a beautiful home, wherein he finds his greatest 
happiness. 

A benedict who, apparently, fills the ideal rule, is the young 
lawyer, Gordon Blanding. Coming of what the Southerners term 
good stock, he has been educated with the principles belonging to 
the class who hold noblesse oblige as a vital one. Studious in hab- 
it, domestic in his tastes, Mr. Blanding is in every sense a model 
husband. Among our young benedicts possibly none have a bet- 
ter record as sush than Crit Thornton, who ever since his mar- 
riage — now many years gone by — has been regarded as a most 
worthy exemplar of the married state. Two young benedicts who 
believe in making the most out of life, that is, having a good 
time, and who have it, are the brothers Scott and Russ Wilson. 
Fortunate in the possession of means lind good health, they en- 
joy this world's benefits as thoroughly as any man in society. A 
benedict of most approved respectability is Louis Parrott. Im- 
maculate in dress and manner. Mr. Parrott glides down the stream 
of life in a calm, domestic way. Always in attendance upon his 
pretty wife, he is cited by the girls as a model of what a husband 
should be. The Bowie family have surely done their duty to so- 
ciety in furnishing excellent husbands for fortunate young ladies, 
and of the number the medical brothers, Hamilton and Robert 
have done ample credit to their house. Both young physicians 
of more than average ability, they are also distinguished in home 
life as thoroughly well bred, polished and domestic. A benedict 
who is one of the youngest in society is Percy Selby, but he re- 
joices in a charming wife, whose savoir vivre is of incalculable bene- 
fit to his youthful inexperience. In their voyage of life, there is 
no danger of quicksands with so adroit a hand to steer. His 
brother, Prentis Selby, is a benedict who is peculiarly fitted for 
the role, having the quiet, settled tastes which go so far toward 
making a happy home. That he appreciates one is shown by his 
having a second time entered the married state. A millionaire 
who is noted for having a like devotion to home and business, 
is Mervyn Donahue, whose success as a railroad man has been 
remarkable in one so young. 



Mr. Frank Newlands is a benedict of the domestic type. A man 
who is universally admitted by the ladies to be without a vice, 
and whose fondness for the married life has been evidenced by 
entering it a second time. His attention to his beautiful wife is 
a matter of note, and as the jovial Captain Cuttle would put it, 
" When found, make a note of it;" we do so, for marital atten- 
tions are not found so very often these days. 

A gentleman who, although tardy in taking matrimony's fet- 
ters upon him, has worn them gracefully and well, is Tiburcio 
Parrott. Mr. Parrott is a living illustration of the oft-heard re- 
mark that no man makes a better husband than one who has 
tired of bachelor existence. Among the older benedicts who pose 
as married men pur ct simple, and not yet entitled to be classed 
as among our bud's papas, are Joe Eastland, L. L. Baker, H. P. 
Bowie and Henry L. Dodge — all gentlemen of unquestioned dig- 
nity and integrity, filling the rote of benedicts as irreproachably 
as they do every other walk of life. Some men achieve greatness, 
others have it thrust upon them. It has long been a mooted 
question under which heading the honors of benedict fell to Tom 
Bell. 

Perhaps the most solidly sedate, if not pompously inclined 
benedict of our society, is William Alvord. A gentleman of 
unimpeachable integrity and moral worth, so correct and virtu- 
ous in all his acts, he has for years been held up as a pattern to 
all men. » Would there were more like him," sigh the neglected 
wives of society. Among the younger generation the duties of 
married life seem to fit very successfully, and its cares to be but 
thistle-down. Two gentlemen who aptly illustrate this are the 
brothers H. H. and R. L. Sherwood, each of whom fills the posi- 
tion of husband to the admiration of all society. Young Ed. 
Eyre, Jr., is wearing with grace and ease his honors as a bene- 
dict. Arthur Page, that veteran usher of all society weddings for 
the past decade, has settled down to the quiet of domestic life in 
the most approved manner. As a well-known belle remarked at 
the last cotillion: '-The Pages all make good husbands, but as 
soon as they become so, they get erased from the book of social 
life." M. Hall McAllister is another young gentleman of known 
domestic worth, whose fireside virtues are the theme of many a 
feminine tongue. His brother-in-law, young Otis, comes in for 
his share of praise also. Charles and Jim Keeney are each model 
young benedicts, Charley outranking his brother in many years 
of wedded bliss. If any one doubts that a gay young man can 
become a settled benedict let them look at Dr. Jim and be con- 
vinced. W. Hinckley Taylor is a young benedict who has thrown 
lustre upon the order by his undeviating attention to home and 
his very pretty wife. 

E. Everett Wise may be classed in the same category, as also 
Basil Heathcote. Joe Donohoe is a young benedict who, although 
one of our society, yet has, since his donning the yoke matrimo- 
nial, lived for the greater part of the time abroad, so that of his 
merits as a benedict one can only speak by hearsay. But all who 
have met the happy young couple declare that Joe is perfect in 
the role. Joseph A. Donohoe pete, is one of our solid benedicts, 
alike pocket, standing and character — man of gentle, kindly 
impulses, broad charities and warm heart. As husband and father 
Mr. Donohoe has ever been held in esteem by friends and ac- 
quaintances. The benedicts who may justly lay claim to being 
two of the best looking men in society, are handsome Phil Lillien- 
thal and distingue Walter Dean. 

Among our benedicts of foreign birth may be named Henry 
Barroilhet, a gentleman of grace and dignity of manner, whose 
courteous bearing and cultivated taste has made him an enviable 
partner through life, Antoine Borel, whose native worth, kind- 
liness of heart, and true love of home, renders him specially fitted 
to be a married man in its highest sense, Mr. de Guigne, whose 
retiring habits and reserved bearing make him better known in 
the domestic circle than elsewhere, and Baron Von Schroeder, 
who, since his marriage with Peter Donahue's daughter, has set- 
tled among us, and may, consequently, claim place among our 
benedicts. W. B. Chapman also comes among our married men 
of foreign birth, as does also Mr. de Laveaga. 

There is an old saying still extant that Scotchmen always make 
good husband, and so far as we know Mr. McGavin has nobly 
sustained the role, tennis being the only rival to the charms of do- 
mestic life in his affections. The rural districts boast of a few 
married men who now and then disport themselves awhile in the 
waters of our swim, among whom are J. A. Robinson, Nat Brit- 
tan, Faxon Atherton and Sidney V. Smith, each and all of them 
shining lights in domestic life. 

Consumption Surely Cured. 
To the Editor: Please iuform your readers that I have a positive remedy 
for above-named disease. By its timely use thousands of hopeless cases 
have been permanently cured. I shall be glad to send two bottles of my 
remedy free to auy of your readers who have consumption, if they will 
seud me their Express aud P. O. address. Respectfully, 

T. A. SLOCUM, M. C, 181 Pearl St., New York. 

What better words of praise can be given than these by Dr. Bab- 
cock, of Wisconsin : " The Best Tonic has given me good satisfaction 
in every case. The indications for which I have prescribed it are 
general debility, loss of appetite, and especially during early periods 
of convalescence." 



Jan 



SAN PR VNCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



2t 




W. GRAND ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE ! 



NOTHI N't; can t>e plainer than the appearance of many of the 
-: French cloth dresses from behind, ami they are simply 
buttoned down ihr hark to some distance below the waist. The 

coalsleevt- l| ■*,-» int<> the arm In tie with a putT consisting of apiece 
of the material cut on the Dross, the two edges put together ami 
gathered. This, with the sleeve, forms A considerable thickness 
through i and reqnirsfl very clever arranging if it is to look 
well. Heine eoniiderably wider in the middle than at the ends, it 
stands well up on the shoulders. A very curious kind of mantle 
is made of figured cloth or brocade. It is, in the first place, a 
jacket with ■ v.-rv lone oval pan on each side, and behind n basque 
of about half Its length, consisting of double Vandykes, two 
above and two below. A double cape cut up in two V's with the 
points upward forms -'jockeys" over the tops of the sleeves, and 
this, as well as the pan* and Vandykes, is edged with a deep full 
chenille fringe. The colors chielly used for this garment are terra- 
cotta, grey, and electric blue, the pattern being in a dark shade on 
a lighter ground. Sometimes there is fur at the wrists and neck, 
but not always. 

Among the prettiest designs for bouse dresses of bengaline or 
of brocade are the pleated princesse gowns, with bodice and skirt 
in one, yet with pleats set in various ways to get rid of the ex- 
treme plainness of the long princesse breadths. In some instances 
the pleats begin on the shoulders and are tapered to the waist 
line, where a passementerie band is set on in points, and the ef- 
fect is given of a full pointed bodice; of course other breadths are 
added under the pleats at the waist line to give sufficient fullness 
for the skirt. The front of such gowns has sometimes a yoke of 
another fabric, and the fullness is added there with a standing 
frill, then drawn away to the sides to disclose a tablier of the fab- 
ric of the yoke; in such dresses the sleeves match the fabric of 
the yoke and tablier. A tasteful princesse dress of this kind is of 
black satin brocade, with yoke, puffed sleeves, and tablier of fish- 
net, a deep netted fringe completing the tablier at the foot. A 
passementerie of palm leaves of silk cords defines the pleated 
■waist in a point in front and back, and narrower curled cord gimp 
edges the high standing collar of the brocade, and divides the puffs 
of net on the sleeves. 

A handsome evening dress for a young woman is of rose-leaf 
soft royale silk. The round corsage is cut down very low on the 
bust, and filled out with a plastron of pink gauze, puffed horizon- 
tally; it has short puffed sleeves. The skirt is long, but without 
a train, and at its lower edge is a border of white silk passemen- 
terie lace, with shaTp points upturned ; a girdle and Medici collar 
of the sharp-pointed passementerie are on the corsage. For the 
moment, straight skirts without a vestige of tournure predominate., 
though there are still many women who persist in their opposi- 
tion to them. Embroidery continues to be a mark of exclusive 
elegance — that is, special embroidery on the garment. The pointed 
decollete bodices of evening dresses are embroidered, sometimes 
in a single design on the front, repeated on each' half of the back, 
others having a narrow vine or border along all the edges, or sim- 
ply a narrow vine on each side of the eyelet-holes in the back, for 
most are laced at the back. 



The bordered goods proved so popular last fall that they have 
been copied in these cotton stuffs from the Scotch factories, and 
she that chooses may obtain chambrais forty-two inches wide, 
with a nine inch bordering woven along one selvage. A pretty 
thing in this style is a French gray chambrai, divided into half- 
inch spaces by pencil lines of white. These run lengthwise of the 
goods to within a quarter of a yard of the bottom, where they in- 
tersect the border, which is formed of graduated bars of white in 
a design of very small linked rings, in raised weave, to simulate 
embroidery. 



One of the prettiest fashions of the last generation has once 
more made its appearance, and that is grGbe, in the shape of wing 
tips and breasts; and, as it was before, this pretty plumage is used 
principally for muffs and in head-gear. A Parisian house has 
brought out a so-called Swedish muff, which is expected to be 
largely bought for 6trenes, and it is all grtT-be, with the exception 
of a very narrow border of beaver or otter, is lined with a bright 
color, such as cardinal or orange, and has a bunch of ribbons of 
the same tint outside. 

The long Russian velvet coat of black and violet, with its sable 
fur and gold embroidery, now being made for the Princess of 
Wales in Paris, will be a most becoming garment ; and an ordinary 
gown of beige cloth, embroidered with tiny roses de Meaxix, and 
edged with gold braid, with a front and sleeves of pale blue China 
crepe, is at once delicate and lovely, and so is an embroidered 
white brocade with pale green front. 



MARVELOUS BARGAINS 
SEASONABLE DRY GOODS ! 

According to onr regular custom, we begin the New Year with a GRAND 
CLEARANCE SALE OF THE BALANCE OF OUR GREAT WINTER 
STOCK, to make room for heavy consignments of spring goods, uow in 
transit To accomplish this result quickly we have made a STARTLING 
CUT IN PRICES that embraces every article in every department, thus 
afford'ug an uuparalleJed opportunity for purchasers, as our offerings in- 
clude the LATEST STYLES AND NOVELTIES in 

Cloaks, Wraps, New markets, 

Jackets, Jerseys, Shawls, 

Colored Dress doocls, 

Ulack JDress Uooils, 

Silks, Satins, Velvets, 
Luces, ltlbboiis, Trimmings, 

diloves. Handkerchiefs, 

Ueuts' Furnishing Woods, 

Corsets, Hosiery, Underwear. 

House Furnishings, etc 



Note.— All are cordially invited to call and inspect our offerings, and 
thus obtain au idea of ttie IRRESISTIBLE BARGAINS PRESENTED IN 
EVERY DEPARTMENT 




MARKET AND JONES STREETS 
Incorporated 1884. 460 Acres 

TBBES -AJ5TD I=J_.^^ISrTS! 
California Nursery Co., 

Niles, Alameda County California. 

LARGEST STOCK ON THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Fruit Trees, Nut Trees, Wine, Raisin and Table Grapes, Berry Plants. 

SEMI-TROPICAL FRUITS: 

Olives -A large collection of French, Italian and Spanish varieties. 
Oranges and Lemons -Home-grown Trees of all leading sorts; Cali- 
foruia and Florida kinds. 
A Large Stock of White Adriatic Fig, of various sizes and prices. 
ORNAMENTALS. SHADE TREES, EVERGREENS, SHRUBS, ROSES, 
CLIMBING PLANTS. ETC. 
For Complete List, send for our New Catalogue. 

CALIFORNIA NURSERY CO., 

NlLES, ALAMEDA COUNTY, CAL. 

JOHN ROCK, Manager. 



W. GIRVIN & CO., 

AND LEATHER BELTING, 



RUBBER 

HOSE, PACKING, ETC., 
RUBBER CLOTHING, BOOTS, SHOES, ETC. 

DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES. 
2 and 4 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

DR. POSEY 

HAS REMOVED HIS OFFICE TO 

iM GEARY STREET, BETWEEN KEARNY AND DUPONT. 

Eye, Ear, Throat, Nose and Gullet. 

Hours— 10 to 3; Sunday, 10 to 12. 

MME. WALDO-COHEN, 

Teacher of Piano-Forte and Singing, ' 
1215 Clay Street, anS Francisco. 



22 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1890. 




THE volume of business, trade and traffic has been seriously 
circumscribed thus far bv the severe storms of rain and snow 
that have very generally prevailed throughout the State. The 
deep snow- upon the mountains has greatly retarded the mails 
and freight trains, in fact, for days together we have been de- 
prived of all mail connections with the East, and this of itself is 
a serious barrier to all mercantile and financial interests. 

The rainfall to this date now approximates 30 inches for the 
season, and is more than twice that at a corresponding date of 
last year. 

Our trade with Australia may be thus epitomized: Exports 
hence for 1889, $2,231,984; to New Zealand, $167,421 : grand total, 
$2,399,405. The Wheat and Flour shipments were 364,798 ctls. 
and 40,755 bbls. respectively. We also sent to Australia 31,167 
ctls. Oats, value, $33,883, and of Lumber 5,668419 feet, value, 
$179,878. The Salmon shipments to the Colonies for the year 
were 69,713 cs. and 1,653 pkgs., value, $393,551. Of Quicksilver 
122 lUks. were sent. The result showing a total increase for 1889 
over that of 1888 of $350,000. 

The steamer Mariposa, from the Colonies via Honolulu, arrived 
here on the ISth inst., with passengers and Government mails, 
and for cargo 5,693 bags Hawaiian Sugar, 1,804 bchs. Bananas. 
From Auckland, 600 bales Flax, 41 cs. Shearling. 43 pkgs. Felt, 13 
pkgs. Gum, etc. From Sydney, 288 sks. Wool, 1,345 ingots Tin, 
57 bales Shearling, etc. 

Imports during the year past of Groceries were as follows: Of 
Sugar, 317,145,144 lbs., of the value of $15,176,148; of this the 
Hawaiian Islands furnished 249,315,406 lbs. (free of duty), Philip- 
pine Islands, 59,526,200 lbs; .lava, 4,240,474 lbs; Central America, 
3.462,161 lbs. ; China, 601,903 lbs. Coffee imports, 20,272,580 lbs. ; 
total value, $2,943,935. Of this Central America furnished 18.- 
460,560 lbs.; Mexico, 578,007 lbs.; China, 490.791 lbs.; the Indies, 
588,591 lbs.; balance scattering. Of Teas we imported during the 
year 7,489,216 lbs., value $935,718; Japan furnishing 5,800,339 
lbs.; China, 1,598,767 lbs. ; Br. East Indies, 30,110 lbs. Rice im- 
ports in 1889 aggregated 46,637,717 lbs., value $1,086,822. Of this 
China contributed 34,535,276 lbs.; Hawaii, 9,862,700 lbs.; Japan, 
2,214,229 lbs.; British Columbia. 20.000 lbs. ; Italy. 5,512 lbs. The 
total value of the Sugar, Coffee, Tea and Rice, as above stated, in 
the primary markets aggregated $20,142,623. 

The East bound overland freight in December per Southern Pa- 
cific Company aggregated 21,124,310 lbs., and of which San 
Francisco contributed 13,262,100 lbs., the balance divided among 
seven other shipping points. Totals for twelve months, 1888 
and 1889 thus compare: 1886, 456,412,330; 1889, 470,406,780. In- 
crease of shipments in 1S89, 13,994,450 lbs. 

Recent Grain charters include the following: Br. Iron ship 
Linlithgowshire, 1,357 tons, W T heat to Cork, O. K., Havre or Ant- 
werp, £1, 18s.; Br. iron ship Alexandra, 1,351 tons, same voyage, 
prior to arrival, at£l, 15s.; Ship Elizabeth, 1,773 tons, Wheat, 
same voyage, as above, £1, 13s. 

Exports for the period under review include the following: To 
Hilo, per Quickstep, 365 bbls. Flour, 524 bales Hay, 24 M feet 
Lumber. 615,210 lbs. Fertilizer, etc.; value. $20,535. To Santa 
Rosalie, per Compeer, 172 M feet Lumber, 13,406 lbs. Coffee, 497 
bales Hay, 100 cases Kerosene, 4,103 gals. Wine, etc.; value, $10,- 
620. The schr. J. F. Miller, for Central America, carried 102 M 
feet Lumber, 70 M Shingles, 100 cases Powder, 200 cases Oil, etc. ; 
value, $7,360; also for Mexico, 2,000 cases and 44 kgs. Powder; 
value, $34,251. 

Hop exports by sea and rail for the past two years thus com- 
pare: 1888, 7,350,227 lbs.; 1889, 6.967,004 lbs., showing a decrease 
the past year of 383,227 lbs. The spot price at date 7(5 lie per lb. 
for those of 1888 and 1889 respectively. 

Barley shipments by sea from San Francisco and from the State 
at large by rail during the past year, 995,719 ctls. ; for the past 
five years, 4,492,290 ctls. ; value, $5,263,927. 

The steamship Oceanic from the Orient, arrived on the morning 
of the 21st, and had for cargo the following: 2,000 bales Manila 
Hemp, 155 bales Calcutta Gunnies. 1,433 pkgs. Oil, 37,000 mats 
China Rice, 289 pkgs. Spice. 38 pkgs. Silk and 724 pkgs. Japan 
Tea ; also in transit for Eastern cities, 1,612 pkgs. Silk, 2,878 pkgs. 
Tea, etc. 

From Baltimore we have two ships with Cumberland Coal — 
Geo. Stetson, 162 days thence with 2.567 tons, and W. F. Babcock 
134 days thence, with 3,350 tons. 

From Mexico we have the steamer Xewbern from Guymas and 
other ports, |witb 434 Hides, 961 empty Quicksilver flasks, ores 
bullion, etc. 

The Sugar market favors the buyer with a recent decline of }c 
per lb. or more. Coffee is held with increasing firmness. Rice 
favors the seller. The Salmon market is flat with a large stock. 
Coal is in active demand this wet and cold weather, prices steady. 
Several cargoes have recently been sold at a loss. 

W. H.Patrick, Teacher of the Piano, removed to 428 Geary Street. 







Sinks — I'm elad you have gotten your liver in active service again, aud 
have returned to French dinners. 

Jinks— Yes, I was cut nut of French dinners for nearly a year. No use 
talkiup. they wear out a liver aud stomach very soon. But the JKtua 
Miueral Waters with my dinners have brought me around agaiu all right, 
and I can now eat as heartily as before. 

Dr. David Wooster, the eminent physician of 746 Mission street, writes: 
I have used the ^Etna Miueral Waters iu my practice for some time, and 
cordially recommend it a* oue of the very best natural mineral waters in 
the market, as a daily drink. For disturbances in the functions of the liver 
aud kidneys it is unsurpassed. 

ST. MATTHEW'S HALL, 

San Mateo, California. 



A SCHOOL FOR BOYS ! 



TWENTY-FOURTH YEAR. 

REV, ALFRED LEE BREWER, M, A„ Rector. 

j^SEND FOR CATALOGUE.13 

FOR LA GRIPPE OR INFLUENZA! 

Wilson's Vaporizing Inhaler is indorsed by the Medical Profession. 
Office*. 239 Kearny Street, First Floor. 

HENRY C. HYDE, 

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR - AT - LAW. 

MICROSCOPICAL EXAMINER 

OI Handwriting, Inks, Papers, etc.. In the Detection of Forgeries, 

Counterfeits and imitations. 

4I1V4 CALIFORNIA STREET. San Francisco. 



LOUIS R0EDERER CHAMPAGNE. 

The Highest tirade Champagne in the World. 

(WHITE LABEL) 

A MaeniSeent Rich Wine. 

"g-zr^zlshd vnsr sec," 

(BROWN LABEL) 

Perfection of a Dry Wine. 

See that every Bottle bears the private label of 

MACONDRAY &. CO., 

Sole Agents for the Pacific Coast. 




J«n. 28, 1890. 



s\\ RTUNCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



23 



64,000. 



64,000. 



IMPORTANT TO ADVERTISERS ! 



The attention of advertisers is called to the fact that the Weekly "Examiner" has attained the largest 
circulation of any weekly newspaper published upon the Pacific Coast, and exceeds by more than 40,000 copies 
per week that of any other weekly paper published west of Chicago. 

Every copy of the 64,000 circulation of the Weekly " Examiner " is paid for by bona-fide subscribers for one 
year in advance. It is read by the purchasing class of ranchers, agriculturists, dairymen, stock-raisers, fruit- 
growers, lumbermen, miners and business-men generally throughout the States of California, Oregon, Washington, 
Nevada, and the neighboring States and Territories. 

Being, from a news and literary standpoint, not excelled by any first-class newspaper in the world, and being 
besides a strictly family paper, it offers advantages for Pacific Coast advertisers such as no other medium what" 
soever can offer. The number of advertisements in each issue is strictly limited, this also being of very great 
advantage to judicious advertisers. The Weekly " Examiner" is issued every Thursday morning. 

Eates of advertising made known on application to the office. 



Address : 



"THE EXAMINER," 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



SWORN STATEMENTS OF CIRCULATION. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA,) 

£ ss. 
City and County op San Francisco, ) 

E. W. TOWNSEND, being duly sworn, says that he is the Busi- 
ness Manager of " TheExaminer," and is personally familiar with the 
facts set forth in the affidavits following, and knows that the circula- 
tion referred to therein is in every case the bona fide, paid-in-advance, 
yearly subscription to the Weekly " Examiner," the same numbering 
sixty-four thousand or more. E. W. TOWNSEND. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me, 
this 6th day of December, A. D. 1889. 

Henry M. McGill, Notary Public. 

THOMAS J. PLYNN, being duly sworn, says that he has charge 
of the books in which subscriptions to the Weekly " Examiner " are 
recorded, and that such books show a record of sixty-four thousand 
or more subscribers to the Weekly " Examiner." THOS. J. FLYNN. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me, 
this 30th day of November, a. d. 1889. 

Henby M. McGill, Notary Public. 

W. F. BOGART, being duly sworn, says that he has charge of the 
cash accounts of the Weekly " Examiner," and that such accounts 
show-that sixtyrfour thousand or more yearly subscriptions to the 
Weekly " Examiner " have been paid in advance within one year. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me, W. F. BOGART. 

this 30th day of November, A. D. 1889. 

Henby M. McGill, Notary Public. 



TIMOTHY NUNAN, being duly sworn, says that he has charge of 
the galleys of mail addresses of Weekly " Examiner " subscribers, 
and that sixty-four thousand or more of such separate addressesjare 
now used for each weekly edition. TIMOTHY NUNAN. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me, 
this 3d day of December, a. d. 1889. 

Lewis B. Haeeis, Notary Public. 

WALTER H. EAGER, being duly sworn, says that he has charge 
of " The Examiner " presses, and that he each week prints sixty-four 
thousand or more Weekly " Examiners " to fill the order of the dis- 
tributing department. WALTER H. EAGER. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me, 
this 3d day of December, a. d. 1889. 

Lewis B. Haeeis, Notary Public. 

JOSEPH WELLSFORD, being duly sworn, says that he has 
charge of the distribution of the Weekly " Examiner," and that his 
department each week wraps up in separately addressed single 
wrappers sixty-four thousand or more Weekly "Examiners," and 
distributes the same by United States Mail and Wells-Fargo Express. 

JOSEPH WELLSFORD. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me, 
this 3d day of December, a. e. 1889. 

Lewis B. Haeeis, Notary Public. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1890. 




LORD Spencer is about to sell his splendid library at Althorp, 
which consists of 50,000 volumes, and is one of the finest pri- 
vate collections in England. For a long time the rarest books in 
this collection were kept at Spencer House, but lately they were 
all removed to Althorp. The library is a companion one to the 
celebrated Sunderland Library, which used to beat Blenheim, and 
as the two families of Spencer and Churchill are derived from the 
same stock, it is probable that the origin of both libraries were at 
one time in the same hands. One of the gems of the collection is 
the edition of Boccaccio, for which the late Duke of Marlborough 
gave £2,260, but which Lord Spencer subsequently bought from 
the present Duke for the comparatively small sum of £918. 



The Lutheran movement in Bohemia, in favor of erecting a 
monument to John Huss, is giving a great deal of trouble to the 
Imperial Government. The Czecks, angry that the portrait of 
Huss should have been excluded from the National Gallery at 
Prague, are resolved to erect a monument to him ; and they are 
supported by many liberal-minded Catholic?, who desire to honor 
Huss as a great Bohemian worthy. The Cardinal-Archbishop of 
Prague, who is a furious opponent of the project, has issued a 
scathing pastoral letter to his clergy, in which he denounces it 
strongly, and they are commanded to do everything in their power 
to thwart it. 



When the Princess of Wales is at Sandringham her life is a very 
busy one. She attends a good deal to her guests, and a great deal 
to the schools, which are very remarkable, both as regards man- 
agement and results. She has established all kinds of technical 
teaching, and her carving school, and that in which brass and 
metal work is taught, are extremely good. She spends a great 
part of her morning looking after them, and she always presents 
bits of work done by her girls to those ladies of whom she is fond. 
She plays a great deal, and reads largely and widely, and is very 
well informed on many subjects. 

Although Germany and Russia are supposed to be at peace, one 
cannot help noticing that they do not treat each other in a very 
friendly way. Since Germany first commenced driving every 
Russian workman across the frontier back into his own country, 
Russia has begun the same kind of thing. The Russian authori- 
ties prevent Germans who live in Russia sending their children 
into the German schools across the frontier, doing their best to 
make the Germans find Russia an uncomfortable place. 



Krupp's gun factory at Essen is, says London Vanity Fair, del- 
uged with orders. Continental powers seem to think that the 
only British gun factory is Elswick, and in almost every one of 
them the work of the Elswick firm has come to be looked upon 
as quite inferior to that of Krupp. Of the immense orders for 
war material just placed with Krupp, a portion at least would have 
come to England had it not come to be believed that English-made 
guns are less reliable than those made at Essen. 



A Russian man-of-war which recently visited Plymouth con- 
veyed from St. Petersburg a magnificent malachite vase, which is 
a gift from the Czar to Lord Revelstoke, and it is so massive that 
it was found necessary to convey it by road to Membland Hall in 
sections. It is probably the finest malachite ornament in the 
country, although there is a splendid vase at Windsor Castle, 
which the Emperor Nicholas presented to the Queen. 

In consequence of Germany's effortjs to increase the number of 
regiments along the French frontier, the French will probably 
strengthen their garrisons in Alsace-Lorraine by one Army Corps. 
The general tendency now is to push all the troops as far for- 
ward as possible, and many towns in Germany, which have been 
garrisoned almost from time immemorial, have not a single soldier 
in them now. 

Count Scheremtjew, the richest man in all Russia, is about to 
produce Puschkin's play, " Boris Godunow" in his own house, and 
has spent 30,000 roubles on scenery and costumes for the piece. 
Among the chief performers are the Count and Countess them- 
selves, Count Meugden, Princess Wolkouski, and Prince Mests- 
cherski. 



Von Moltke bears this testimony: "Beer is a far more danger- 
ous enemy to Germany than all the armies of France." But the 
French drink nearly as much beer as the Germans. How then? 

The exact date of Prince Eddie's return from India is not ac- 
curately known at Marlborough House, but the Prince expects 
that his eldest son will be in England again in April. 



Colonel North relates that his recent little trip to South Amer- 
ica cost £20,000. 



H. M. NEWHALL & CO., 

Shipping and Commission Merchants 

flos. 309 and 37 7 Sansome Street, San Francisco, California, 
Sole Agents Purimaohos Fire-proof Cement, "indestruct- 
ible and infallible." 
Sole Agents for "Bull Dog" brand of Bass' Ale and Guinness' 

STOUT-Bottled by Robert Porter & Co. 
Sole Agents Johnson's Elephant brand English Portland 

Cement. 
general agents— national assurance co. op ireland •, 
atlas assurance co. of london ; 

boylston insurance co. of boston. 

H. B Williams. A. Cheskbrough. W. H. Dimond. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO. 

SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 
UNION BLOCK, JUNCTION MARKET AND PINE STREETS. 



Agents for— 



Pacific Mail Steamship Company, i 
Pacific Steam Navigation Company, 
The Cunard Royal Mail Steamship | 

Company, " i 

"The California Line of Clippers," 

from New York, | 



" The Hawaiian Line of Packets," 
The China Trade and Insurance Co. 

(L'd.), 
The Baldwin Locomotive Works, 

Steel Kails and Track Material. 



Steam Boiler Incrustations. 

Old Scale Removed, Formation of New Scale Prevented. 

Without the Aid of Chemicals, by the Use of the 
LLEWELLYN FILTER-HEATER AND ONDENSER 1 

vOver 300 in Dally Use on the Pacific Coast.) 

Removes all Impurities from the Water before Entering the Boiler. 
Heats the Water to 212°. Saves from 25 to 50 per cent, in the Amount of 
^Vater Used 

Illustrated and Descriptive Pamphlet Forwarded on Application to 

Llewellyn Steam Condenser Manufacturing Co., 

330 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

J. D. Spreckels & Bros., 
SHIPPING AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

Agents for Spreckels' Line of Hawaiian Packets, S. S. Hepworth's Centri 
f ugal Machines, Reed's Patent Pipe and Boiler Covering. 
327 Market Street, corner Fremont, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 

SELBY SMELTING AND LEAD COMPANY, 

416 Montgomery Street, : : San Francisco. 

Qold and Silver Refinery and Assay Office. 
gtf Manufacturers of Bluestone, Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Shot and 
The •'Standard" Machine-Loaded Shotgun Cartridges, under the 
Chamber/in Patents. 

WILLIAM HARNEY, TIMOTHY HOPKINS, 

Mgr. and Sec'y. Treasurer. 



ARIEL LATHROP, 
President. 

GOLDEN GATE WOOLEN MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURE 

BLANKETS, CASS1MERES, TWEEDS AND FLANNELS. 
635 Market Street, San Francisco. 



CUNNINGHAM CURTISS, &. WELCH, 

WHOLESALE STATIONERS AND BOOKSELLERS, 

327, 329, SSI SANSOME STREET. 



S. L. JONES & CO., 

Auctioneers and Commission Merchants, 
207 and 209 California Street. 



ARCHITECTURE. 



AUOESTUS 1AVJEK (taver, Mnllany A laver) having returned 
from Europe, has resumed the practice of his profession. 
Offices, 93 Flood Building, corner of Market and Fourtli Sts., 

San Francisco. 



DRESS SUITS FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



C O O I? IE E. , 

MERCHANT TAILOR. 

24 New Montgomery St., Palace Hotel Building. 



Jan. 2.-», 1890 



SAN |.'K \\( II8C0 NEWS i.kttki;. 



25 



AMONG THE AMERICANS. 

Til K language of the American la .1. .-i.U-.lly Interesting, whether 
w* t^M Hi' alidad i rUp «..r.l* ..( YankM speech, or the -l>ipl>- 
falutin rn Statu. There is no fear 

(or thij language. The eccentricities which at present bulge and 
warp will in lime subside. Education will imparl a more hur- 
arv— n..i necwaarilj le>? suitable— charaoter to the language. 
Hut will education impart a more mellifluous accent, a sweeter, 
softer voice' an Englishman, however cultivated, is rarely 
Jarred by the Americanisms — they carry their own credentials; 
but he draws the line at the nasal twang, the high, sustained and 
rapid jarring voice, the occasional prolonged drawl. When in 
America 1 had two compliments paid me — in my national char- 
acter— anent this. A group of us were talking in an Kastern 
hotel, and an old gentleman, a Virginian senator, said to me: " I 
reckoned you English directly you opened your mouth. I judged 
it by your accent." "Accent." forsooth! Who, thought I, spoke 
with the accent! Nevertheless, I took it as a compliment. Upon 
another occasion an Englishman whom I had just met mentioned 
that he had mistaken me for an American partly, I believe, be- 
cause I was in the company of one! My companion burst out: 
" Why. goodness gracious! You never heard an American speak 
from his chest like that — and you never will!" Allowing for a 
slight exaggeration on the part of my friendly companion, I may 
say that Jonathan rarely sounds a chest note. But education in 
this matter is looking up. The wealthier, more traveled Ameri- 
cans are afflicted with Anglo-mania. They have got it badly. 
They are modeling their houses, their equipages, their clothes, 
their customs upon those of the English. They imitate our very 
slang expressions in order to become more " English, you know." 
And I am glad to say that some of the more audacious are even 
attempting to speak with English intonation. And that this is 
not a mere » international amenity " on my part, I will leave the 
Wets Fori Sua to speak for its fellow citizens: "In one respect 
the average American woman is far behind her English sister. 
Her voice is not so melodious, and her intonation is less agree- 
able. A crowd of American women, it must be confessed, will 
make a din with their voices which distresses the ear. Here the 
voice is high and harsh; there (in England) it is low and soft, 
soothing and gratifying the ear like sweet music." An American 
lady, belonging to a famous New York family, lately stayed here 
for several months, in order to be Anglicized. She would fre- 
quently say to me, " Do I speak like an English woman? Isn't 
that very English? " and so on. But a few days ago an American 
girl came to me in ecstasies over the charming voices of some 
flower girls in one of our London streets. " Ah," she said, " we 
have nothing like that." — London Temple Bar. 

A NOBLE INSTITUTION. 



ARCHBISHOP RIORDAN has made an appeal to the people of 
this city for aid for the St. Joseph's Home for Incurables, 
which was established in October, 1889, and which is now some 
six thousand dollars in debt, owing to extensive and much needed 
improvements. This worthy institution is under the care of the 
Hospital Sisters of San Francisco, and here are treated persons 
afflicted with incurable diseases, such as paralysis, and rheuma- 
tism, for whom there is no place of refuge in this city or State, as 
all our existing hospitals dismiss such cases when they are de- 
clared hopeless. It is the first building of the kind that was 
established in California, and much good has been done since its 
founding. Persons, irrespective of creed and color are received 
and cared for, and it is to be sincerely hoped that the archbishop's 
pathetic appeal for assistance will be responded to with alacrity 
by our charitable citizens. It is good and noble work and should 
be fostered, for there are none who are so deserving of our help 
as those whose diseases are incurable. 



AN UNFORTUNATE GHOST. 

AVERY curious anecdote comes from a lady connected with 
the Austrian court, says an English society paper. It seems 
that before a death occurs in the Hapsburg family a gray figure 
appears three nights running, walking along a certain passage in 
the palace. The tradition is as well known in Vienna as that of 
the White Lady in Berlin. Some time ago there was a report that 
the gray figure had been seen two nights running in the fatal pas- 
sage. One of the Emperor's equerries, providing himself with a 
pistol, determined to watch on the third night. The figure in due 
course appearing, the equerry fired, and the ghostly visitant shuf- 
fled away, leaving very distinct drops of blood behind him as a 
souvenir of his practical joke. But the strangest part remains to 
be told. Within a week of this affair Prince Rudolf committed 
suicide. 



Kate Field is now running a paper in Washington, D. C, and 
every chance she gets she speaks a good word for San Francisco. In 
speaking about life here, she said the only place where she had ever 
eaten a nice meal was at the Original Swain's Bakery, 213 Sutter 
street. Bravo, Katel You know a good thing when you have tried 
it. 

The most Reliable Optician of the Pacific Coast; C. Muller, 135 Mont 
gomery street, near Bush. 



CATARRH. 
Catarrhal Deafness— Hay Fever— A New Home Treatment.— Suf- 
ferers are not generally aware that these diseases are contagious, or 

Unit i hey are dueto the presenceol living parasites in the lining mem- 
brane ol the nose .Mel Eustachian tubes. Microscopic research, how- 
ever, has proved this to lie a fait, and the result ot this discovery is 
that a simple remedy lias been formulated whereby catarrh, catarrhal 



deafness and hay fever are permanently cured in from one to three 
simple applications made at home by the patient once in two weeks. 
-This treatment is not a snuff or an ointment; both have been 



discarded by reputable physicians as injurious. A pamphlet ex- 

S'aining this new treatment is sent on receipt of stamp by A. H. 
ixon & Son, 337 and 339 West King street, Toronto, Canada. 

— Christian Standard. 
Sufferers from Catarrhal troubles should carefully read the above. 

"'Brown's i;r, .in in, i Troches' are excellent for the relief of 
Hoarseness or Sore Throat. They are exceedingly effective."— Christian 
Wnrld, London, England, 



CANADIAN ANTHRACITE COAL! 

No Smoke! No Soot! Clean, Clear, Cheerful I 

Thirty per cent, more heatiugpower than tbe bituminous coal sold in the 
market. Can be burned in auy furnace, range, stove or grate with a good 
draught, 

No more blackened ceilings. No holes burned in carpets. Trv it and be 
convinced. 

CANADIAN ANTHRACITE COAL COMPANY, 

Yard, Cor. Second and Brannan. 

^►-Telephone No. 1610. 
J. P. SPRECKELS & BROS., Agents. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Crocker Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Quijotoa, Arizona. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 20th day of January, 1890, an assessment (No. 81 of Tea Cents 
(10c) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the 
office of the Company, room 26, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San 
Francisco, California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The fifth (5th) day of March, 1890, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on FRIDAY, the twenty-eighth (28th) day of March, 1890, to 
pay the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

NAT. T. MESSER, Secretary.™ 

Office— Room 26, Nevada Block, No. 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Silver King Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business — J an Francisco, California. Lo- 
cation of works— Pioneer District, Pinal Cimuty, Arizona. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of oirectors, held on 
the 15th day of January, 1890, an assessment (No. 2) of Thirty Cents (30c) per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable imme- 
diately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at the office of the 
Company, room 26, Nevada BIock, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

The twenty-sixth (26th) day of Februay, 1890, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on THURSDAY, the twenty-seventh (27th) day of March, 
18J0, to pay delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and 
expenses of sale. Bv order of tbe Board of Directors. 

AUG. WATERMAN, Secretary. 

Office— Room 25, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Overman Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, California. Loca- 
tion of works— Gold Hill, Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 31st day of December, 1889, an assessment (No. 61) of Twenty-five 
Cents per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately in United States gold coin, to the Secretary, at 
the office of the Company, No. 414 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
The 5th day of February, 1890, will be delinquent, 
and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless payment is made be- 
fore, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 2fith day of February, 1j*90, to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 
y GEO D. EDWARDS, Secretary. 

Office— No. 414 Cali fornia streat, San Francisco, California. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Occidental Consolidated Mining Company. 

Assessment ■• No. 5 

Amount per Share 25 Cents 

Levied January 2n, 1890 

Delinquent in Office February 25, 1890 

Day of Sale of Delinquent Stock ... .March 24, 1890 

3 ALFRED K. DURBKOW, Secretary. 

Office— Room 69, Nevada Block, No. 30y Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1890. 



NELLY AND WE. 

NELLY BLY had the misfortune to pass by San Francisco on 
the other side, and make her first acquaintance with Califor- 
nia at Oakland. Fortunately there were some patriotic reporters 
on hand to give her an idea of the glories she had missed. " How 
rich your people are!" she sighed, as she looked toward the 
golden city. Mist and smoke curtained the bulk of the town. 
Above the clouds rose the peaks of two or three hills surmounted 
with palaces, looming with vague suggestiveness of mysterious 
splendor through the pulsing air. From one towered an ancient 
castle, battlemented and haughty. Miss Ely looked at this half- 
veiled magnificence, and thought pityingly of the prosy streets of 
New York, with their bandbox Vanderbilt houses and their gim- 
crack St. Patrick's Cathedrals. There was nobody to tell her that 
the palaces on the hills were built of wood, and would be the 
better for a little paint. She failed to discover that the medieval 
castle was a beer saloon. She had no chance to find out what a 
San Francisco street is like after three months' rain. She missed 
the opportunity of visiting the unique packing-cases in which 
San Francisco's school children are boxed up ready for the first 
fire or epidemic that may happen to call for them. She failed to 
enjoy the delight of being banged over the cobbles in the Black 
Maria to the Receiving Hospital to be treated for faintness by an 
emetic and a jab in the back of the neck. She did not see some 
of the principal business blocks of San Francisco occupied by 
frame shanties worth three dollars a cord. She missed the spec- 
tacle of buildings burning down for lack of any way to get water 
on them. Her eyes were never gladdened by the sight of the 
paranthetical limbs of Deacon Fitch. Therefore she said: " How 
rich your people are!" and envied us. Would it not be possible 
to have all distinguished globe-trotters transferred between the 
trains and the steamers by tugs, so that they could write up their 
impressions of San Francisco from the outside? 

THE HIGHEST RAILWAY. 

THE year 1892 will probably be signalized in South America by 
a most interesting event in civil engineering and in interna- 
tional overland commerce, says a Sonth American correspondent. 
This will be nothing less than the completion and opening of the 
Transandean Railroad, forming another railroad line from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific, and the first across the continent of South 
America. It is nineteen years since this work was begun, and it 
is now confidently expected that it will be finished by the begin- 
ning of 1802. The road is to be run from Buenos Ayres to Val- 
paraiso, a distance of 871 miles. There are now 640 miles of it 
finished at the Buenos Ayres end, and eighiy two at the Valpa 
raiso end. Of the remaining 149 miles about one-third is practi- 
cally complete, the rails being laid. The passage of the Andes is 
accomplished at the Cumbre Pass, which is 13,0i5 feet above the 
sea level. The railroad, however, does not reach the summit of 
the pass, but pierces the mountains by means of a tunnel more 
than three miles long, at an elevation of 10,450 feet above the sea. 
This makes it one of the highest, if not the highest, railroad in 
the world. There is nothing in Europe to compare with it. The 
St. Gothard Railroad is 3,788 feet high, and that on Rigi only at- 
tains an elevation of 5,773 feet. The grades are, of course, very 
steep. For a considerable distance tne rise is more than 422 feet 
to the mile, or one foot in every twelve and one-half. On this 
portion of the line a rack-rail is employed, similar to the Hartz 
and other mountain roads. 



THE CROCKER ASTRONOMICAL EXPEDITION. 

COLONEL CROCKER has to be congratulated upon the success 
of the astronomical expedition he sent to Cayenne to take 
observations on the eclipse of the ^un. It was at first reported 
that Messrs. Burnham and Schaeberle were unable to take photo- 
graphs and observe the corona on account of the cloudiness of the 
weather, but fortunately the clouds rolled away, and the observa- 
tions were taken. The death of Father S. J. Perry, who was in 
charge of the English expedition to Cayenne was exceeding un- 
fortunate. Father Perry was well-known in the United States, 
where he had many friends. 

THE Patti season promises to be a most brilliant one, and the 
company which accompany her are all artists. Among them 
may be mentioned Madame Emma Albani and the great tenor, 
Signor Tamagno. Tben there is a chorus of eighty persons, 
twenty-four danseuses and a military band of thirty pieces. 
Marcus Mayer has all the arrangements for the opera well in 
hand, and the sale of seats by auction will commence at noon on 
January 29th, the season sale on January 30th, and the single- 
night sale on February 3d. 

Important to Eastern Travelers. 



The Atlantic and Pacific Railroad, " the great middle route," is 
the popular line to the East at this time of the year, on account of its 
freedom from snow blockades. Call at No. 4 New Montgomery street, 
under Palace Hotel, for full particulars. Through sleepers to St. 
Louis or Chicago. Low rates. W. A. Bissell, General Passenger 

Agent. 



OBITUARY. 

ADDISON C. NILES, who had been a Justice of the Supreme 
Court of California, from 1871 to 1880, died most unexpect- 
edly in this city last Friday evening. The deceased had been 
complaining of a bad cold, but it was never throught that he was 
in any danger. Judge Niies was born in Oswego County, New 
York, sixty years ago. He arrived in California in 1852 and in 
conjunction with Judge McFarland, published a newspaper in 
Nevada County. On the expiration of his term of office, he prac- 
ticed law. Judge Niles leaves one son and a sister, who is the 
wife of the present Supreme Judge. He was a prominent Mason 
and was, at one time, Grand Orator of that order. 

MRS. ANNA WALKER BROWN died in Oakland, at the resi- 
dence of her son, John G. Edwards, editor of the Coast Re- 
view, last Tuesday evening. Mrs. Brown was in her 74th year; 
she came to America with her parents when but 13 years old, and 
the family resided for a number of years in Cincinnati. In that 
city she married Joseph R. Brown. In 1874 they emigrated to 
California and settled in San Diego, where they always lived. 
Mrs. Brown was an active Christian worker, always willing to 
assist a good cause, and was always engaged in doing Christian 
work. A large number of benevolent societies will mourn her 
loss. 

MJ. KEATING, the Superintendent of the Almshouse, died 
. last Thursday morning from an acute attack of pneumonia. 
The deceased was an Englishman, and was 56 years of age. He 
was a well-known politician and had been quite prominent in 
Democratic circles. In 1869 he was appointed to the Superintend- 
ency of the Almshouse, and owing to the excellent manner in 
which he conducted the institution the changes in the administra- 
tion did not effect him. 

WILLIAM VALE died in this city on Jan 21st, at the age of 
47. He was a native of Toronto, Canada. Some thirteen 
years ago he entered the employ of the Bulletin, in the business 
department, and showed such aptitude for that work that he was 
regarded as second to none. A year ago he left that paper and 
went into real estate, in the prosecution of which business he 
was eminently successful. He leaves a widow, but no children. 

WARREN H, MILLS, capitalist and real estate operator, died 
at his residence, 608 Ellis street, last Tuesday, of pneumonia. 
He was a native of New York, and was 60 years of age. Mr. 
Mills came to California in 1860 and amassed a fortune of $250,- 
000 by fortunate ventures in real estate. 

MRS. G. STUART SIMONS, wife of the well-known jeweler, 
died during the week, after a brief illness. The deceased 
was a daughter of Captain S. B. Peterson, and her death will be 
felt by her many friends in this city and Oakland. 

WJ. McDOUGALL, who for fourteen years has been the or- 
. ganist of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Oakland, died last 
Wednesday, after a short illness. The deceased was well-known 
in musical and literary circles, both of this city and in Oakland. 

ADAM FOREPAUGH, the great circus proprietor, died during 
the week at his home in Philadelphia at the age of 68. He 
leaves a widow, a son and $1,000,000. 

WHEN Patti arrives we may look out for a rush on red hair 
dye. Ladies who have allowed their tresses to resume their 
natural color this winter will plunge again into the bleaching 
business, and the woman born to the glory of a foxy pole will be 
queen of the nincompoopesses. 

COL. W.J. SUTHERLAND and party, have returned from a 
trip to the Lick Observatory at Mount Hamilton, and are reg- 
istered at the Palace, 



Go! thou man with the dyspepsia, and have it cured byeating at 
the Maison Riche, corner Geary street and Grant avenue. 

J. F. Cotter's Old Bourbon.— This celebrated Whisky is for sale by all 
druggists and flrst-class grocers. Trade mark — star within a shield. 



Fine Table §^>* 

WINES ^ 



From our Celeb 

ORLEANS VINEYARD 




Producers 
of the 




Champagne 



530 WASHINGTON ST. 

San Francisco 



General Ageneiea 

NEW YORK 

PARI & IIWOM, 917 Broidwij 

PHILADELPHIA 

F. P. MllET i CO, 25 S. tenth Strut 

CHICAGO 
0. JEVHE ft CO.. 110 Madison Strut 

ST. PAUL 
C. JEVSE S CO., 114 E. Third Street 

DETROIT 

G. k R. HcMILI AH, 131 Woodard Arenns 

CINCINNATI 
JOS. R. PEEBLES SONS' CO.. Pike's Bldg. 

honolulu 
himhtoh jomsoh 



Jan. 25, 1890. 



BAN n: INCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



27 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY. 

PACIFIC SYSTEM. 

Tr*mt Umvo and art Due to Arrive at 

SAN FHANCISCO: 

lb*tb| From January J. 1890. I LMMITM 

7 JO a. H»y« ! s * u J "~" 

7.30 a. 3icrimt»,t Ko<Miue. rU l>»vlti 
7 SO*. )s«crminouto, auburn, Colfax. 
S:00a. Martiuei, V&llcju, Cali»lugft and 

Stall Ko>* 6;16 . 

8:30a. Los Augele* Express, Fresno. 
ItakiT.-fiolJ. Mujavi* and Ka&1, 
and I 11:15 a. 

8:30a. Nile*. Sau Jo*e, Stockton, lone, 
Sacramento, Marvsville, Oro- 
villeaud Ked Bluff 5:46 P. 

10:30a. Haywurd* and Nile*. 2:16 P. 

•12-00 X. Havwardf».NHe»aud San Jose. . . "3:45 P. 
•1K»P Sacramento River Steamer* '•6:00 A. 

S:0Qp. llayward?.. Nile* and cfau Jose 9:45 a. 
3:30p. Secoud CIbmj for Ugden *fc East.. 10:46 P. 
4 00 p. Stockton and JMiltou; Vallejo, 

Caiistoga and Santa Rosa. 9:45a. 

4-30 p. Sacramento and Kuight's Land- 
ing via Uavis 10:45 a. 
Nile* and Livermore *8:45 a. 



M:S0p 
•4.30P 

6:30 P. 

6.00 P 



Havward? and Niles.. ... . 

Sunset Koule, Atlantic Express, 
Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, 
Deming.El Paso, New Orleans 
aud East ... - 

7 -00 p. Shasta Route Express, Sacramen- 
to, Marysrille. Redding, Port- 
laud, Puget Souud and East 

8:00 p. Central Atlantic Express, Ogden 
and East. 



Santa Crui Division. 



17:20 p. 



13-OOa. Hunters Train to San Jose. 
S:15a. Newark, Ceuterville, San Jose, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

Santa Cruz 6:50 p. 

•2:15 P. Centerville, San Jose, Almaden, 
Felton, Boulder Creek and 

SantaCruz *11:50a. 

4:15 p. Centerville, San Jose and Los 

Gatos 9:50a, 



Coast Division {Third a d Townsend Street s). 

7:25 a. San Jose, Almaden and Way 

Stations 2:30 p. 

8:30a. San Jose, Gilroy, Tres Piuos, Pa- 
jaro, Santa Cruz, Monterey, 
Pacific Grove, Salinas, San 
Miguel, Paso Robles and Santa 
Margarita (San Luis Obispo) & 

principal Way Stations 6 :12 P. 

10:30a. San Jose, and Way Stations. 5 02p. 

12-01 p. Cemetery, Menlo Park and Way 

Stations 3:38 p. 

•3:30 p. San Jose, Tres Pinos, SantaCruz, 
Salinas, Monterey, PacificGrove 
aud principal Way Stations. ...*10:OOa. 
*4:20p. Menlo Park and Way Stations.. . *7;58a. 

5 J20 p. San Jose and Way Stations . . . . 9 .03 A 

6 -30 p. Menlo Park aud Way Stations ... 6 :35 A. 
+11:45 P. Menlo Park and principal Way 

Statious +7:28 p. 



a. for Morning. p. for Afternoon. 

*8undays excepted. +Saturdays only. 

jSuudays only. ^Saturdays excepted. 

**Mondays excepted. 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY. 

The Company's Steamers will sail 
For New "York via Panama, 

8. S. Acapulco Monday, February 3d, 

at 12 o'clock noon, 

Taking freight aud passengers dire't for— 
Mazatlan, Acapulco, Ocos, Champenco, San Jose 
de Guatemala, Acajutla, La Libertad, Corinto, 
Punta Arenas and Pauama. 

For Hongkong via Yokohama, 

City of Rio de Janeiro — Saturday, Feb. 15, 1890, 
at 3 p. m. 

China Tuesday, March 11, 1890, 

at 3 P. M. 

City op Peking Thursday, April 3d, 

at 3 p. m. 
Round-Trip Tickets to Yokohama and return at 
reduced rates 
For Freight or Passage apply at the Office, cor- 
ner First and Brannan streets. 

WILLIAMS, DIMOND & CO., 

Agents. 
George H. Rice, Traffic Manager. 

Best Roller Made, 

Starr's Choice Extra ! 

Guaranteed Always Highest Quality. 
STARR & CO., 



AN EXECUTION IN TONQUIN. 

iiV du IbnHn publishes a couple of 
columns of a description of tlie execution 
.if the Dol Van, which took place at Hanoi. 
Tlif ceremony was thoroughly theatrical. 
Van was iirst carried through the streets in 
■ heavy wooden cage like a wild beast en 
route to some menagerie, his wrists fet- 
tered and his neck bent under a great 
cangue, the inscription in front of him: — 
" Vnong van Yang, traitor and perjuror." 
The whole place turned out to see him exe- 
cuted. Every European, every woman, — 
hustled for a place, and the trees were 
thronged with natives. At 4:30 a detach- 
ment of militia arrived and surrounded the 
scaffold on which the native sergeant who 
was to strike the fatal blow, had already 
taken his place, dressed in red velvet, and 
carrying a Japanese sword. At five o'clock 
the gendarmes opened the cage, and the 
chieftain, still manacled, mounted the scaf- 
fold with a manly step. The executioner 
loosened his vest, and bound him to the 
upright post, and his handcuffs were re- 
moved. His crime and sentence were read 
out in French, and then interpreted to him 
by an Annamite official, who at that mo- 
ment carried a bullet in him which the 
prisoner had fired in an encounter long 
past. They recognized each other, and the 
interpreter said something in a low tone. 
Van returned a look of hatred and con- 
tempt and bade the executioner strike 
surely. But the signal was not yet given. 
His turban and upper clothing were pulled 
off, leaving his breast naked, and revealing 
scars inflicted both by ball and sabre. A 
compassionate assistant cut off 1 the long 
hair and stroked him as he bent his head 
to the block, and Van lay motionless. The 
executioner stood on the left, a gong rang 
out thrice and before the echoes died away 
the sabre flashed through the air and the 
insurgent's head rolled away to the edge of 
the platform. It was picked up and thrown 
to the mob almost before the glaze of 
death had come over the eyes, and barely 
escaped the disgrace of being seized by a 
pariah dog. 

A PROMINENT citizen was introduced 
to Captain Lees the other day. "What," 
said the introducer, " don't you know Mr. 
Blank?" " I forget your name, but your 
face is quite familiar to me," said the Cap- 
tain, blandly. The citizen blushed. " A 
dubious compliment from a detective," he 
murmured, as he asked the gentlemen to 
give it a name. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND NORTH PACIFIC 
RAILWAY. 

"THE DONAHUE BROAD-GAUGE ROUTE." 

COMMENCING SUNDAY, MARCH 17, 1889, and 
until further notice, Boats aud Trains will 
leave from and arrive at the San Francisco Pas- 
seuger Depot, MARKET-STREET WHARF, as 
follows: 



6 Callifornia St., 



San Francisco. 



OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

Carrying U. 8., Hawaiian and Colonial Mails. 

Will leave the Company's Wharf, Mission Street, 
No. 1, 

For Honolulu, Auckland and 

Sydney, Without Change: 

The Splendid New 3,000-ton Iron Steamer 

Mariposa Saturday, February 8, 1890, at 12 M 

Or immediately on arrival of the English mails. 

For Honolulu: 

S. S. Australia (3,000 tons), Jan. 31, 1890, at 12 m. 

For Freight or Passage apply at Office, 327 Mar- 
ket street. 

JOHN D. SPRECKEL8 & BROS., 
General Agents. 



The Best Instantaneous Photos 



Are taken at the 




838 Market Street, opposite Fourth. 
JONES * lAVtX, Proprietors. 



Leav 


bS. F. 


Destination. 


Arrive in s. F. 


gg* Isundays 


Sundays 


Week 
Days. 


7:40 a.m. 
3:30 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 
5:00 p.m. 


Petaluma 

and 

Santa Rosa. 


10:40 a.m 
6:10p.m 


8:50a. m. 
10:30 a.m 
6:05p.m. 




7:40a.m. 
3:30p.m. 


8:00a.m. 


Fulton 
Windsor, 
Healdsburg, 
ljitton Springs, 
Cloverdale & 
Way Stations. 


6:10p.m. 


10:30a. m 
6:05p.m 


7:40 a.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


Hoplaad 
and Ukiah. 


6:10 P. M. 


6:05 p.m. 


7:40 a.m. 


8:00a.m. 


Guerneville. 


6:10p.m. 


6:05p.m. 


7:40 a.m. 
5:00 p.m. 


8:00 a.m. 


Sonoma and 
Glen Ellen. 


10:40a.m. 
6:10p.M. 


8:50a.m. 
6:05 p. m. 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for White Sulphur 
Springs, Sebastopol and Mark West Springs; at 
Geyserville for Skaggs Springs, at Cloverdale for 
the Geysers, at Hopland for Highland Springs, 
Kelseyville, Soda Bay, Lakeport and Bartlett 
Springs, aud at Ukiah for Vichy Springs, Saratoga 
Springs, Blue Lakes, Willits, Cahto, Capella, 
Potter Valley, Sherwood Valley and Mendocino 
City. 

EXCURSION TICKETS from Saturdays to Mon- 
days—To Petaluma, $1 50, to Santa Rosa, $2 25; to 
Healdsburg, $3 40; to Litton Springs, $3.60; to Clo- 
verdale, $450; to Guerneville, $3.75; to Sonoma, 
$1.50; to Glen Ellen, $1.80. 

EXCURSION TICKETS, good for Sunday only- 
To Petaluma, $1 ; to Santa Rosa, $1 50 ; to Healds- 
burg,^^; to Litton Springs, $2.40; to Cloverdale, 
$3: to Guerneville, $2.50; to Sonoma, $1; to Glen 
Ellen, $1.20. 

From San Francisco for Point Tiburon and San 
Rafael, Week Days— 7:40, 9:20, 11 :20 A. N. ; 3 :30, 5:00, 
6:15 P. M. Sundays— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 a.m. ; 1:30, 5:00, 
6:20 p. M. 

To San Francisco from San Rafael, Week Days— 
6:20,7:55,9:30 a.m.; 12;45, 3:40, 5.05 p. M. Sundays— 
8:10, 9:40a.M.; 12:15, 3:40, 5:00 p. m. 

To San Francisco from Point Tiburon, Week 
Days— 6:50, 8:20, 9:55 A. M.; 1:30, 4:05, 5:30 p. M. 
Sundays— 8:40, 10:05 a.m.; 12:40, 4:05,5:30 p.m. 

On Saturdays an extra trip will be made from 
San Francisco to San Rafael, leaving at 1:40 p. m. 
H. C. WHITING, PETER J. McGLYNN, 

Gen. Manager. Gen. Pass, and Tkt. Agt. 

£gr~TICKET OFFICES— A: Ferry, 222 Montgomery 
Street and No. 2 New Montgomery Street. 

PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO. 

Steamers of this Company will sail from 
BROADWAY WHARF as follows: 

The steamers MEXICO and UMATILLA direct 
for VICTORIA, B. C, and PC GET SOUND ports, 
at 9 a. m. every Friday. 

The steamer UMATILLA, sailing every other 
Friday, at 9 a. m., connects at Port Townsend 
with Steamers IDAHO and ANCON for Alaska. 

Fob PORTLAND, Oregon, in connection with 
the O. R. AND N. CO., every four days. 

FOR SANTA CR CJZ, MONTEREY, San 
Simeon, Caytjcos, Port Harford, San Luis Obis- 
po, Gaviota, Santa Barbara, San Buenaven- 
tura, Hueneme, San Pedro, Los Angeles and 
San Diego, about every second day. 

For EUREKA, ARCATA and HOOKTON, Hum- 
boldt Bay, Tuesday, at 9 a. m.— LOS ANGELES. 

For POINT ARENA, MENDOCINO, etc., every 
Monday and Thursday, at 4 p. m. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 214 Montgomery street, 
Near Pine. 

GOODALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen'l Agents, 
No. 10 Market street, San Francisco. 

OCCIDENTAL AND ORIENTAL S. S. CO. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 
Steamers leave wharf corner FIRST AND BRAN- 
NAN STREETS, at 3 o'clock p. m., for YOKO- 
HAMA AND HONGKONG, connecting at Yoko- 
hama with Steamers for SHANGHAI: 

Steamer. 1890. 

Oceanic Tuesday, February 4. 

Gaelic Thursday, February 27. 

Belgic Saturday, March 22. 

OCEANIC I UFSDAY, April 15. 

ROUND TRIP TICKETS AT REDUCED RATES. 

Cabin Plans on exhibition and Passage Tickets 
for sale at S. P. Company's General Offices, Room 
74, Cor. Fourth and Townsend streets, San Fran- 
cisco. 

For Freight, apply to the Traffic Manager, at the- 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company's Wharf, or at 
No 202 Market street(Union Block) San Francisco. 
T. H. GOODMAN, Gen. Pass. Agt. 

GEO. H. RICE, Traffic Manager. 



28 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Jan. 25, 1890. 




THE motive of England in taking such determined action in 
reference to Portugal's aggressions in southeastern Africa is 
not as well understood hereabouts as it might be. To people not 
posted it seems to be a small matter over which to make so 
great a bother. England and Portugal have long been fast friends 
and allies. Everybody knows how the great Duke of Wellington 
saved Portugal's independence by the Peninsular war against 
Napoleon's forces. From that time to this the friendly relations 
between the two countries have grown more and more intimate, 
and their trade exchanges are large and profitable. Why, then, 
it may be asked, has either of them thought a strip of territory in 
any part of Africa of sufficient importance to justify the endan- 
gering of such a good understanding? To rightly comprehend 
the prize that is involved in dispute, ii is necessary to realize 
something of what is going on in southeastern Africa. The geog- 
raphy of the locality and the developments taking place there- 
abouts are not as well understood in this country as they deserve 
to be. To the extreme north of the Transvaal Republic gold is 
being mined in large quantities, and a state of affairs exists there 
at this moment which is said to rival California and Australia in 
their palmiest days. British subjects are emigrating there in vast 
numbers and building up large interests. The gold leads are all 
heading northeast into Swazieland and Nyassaland, and beyond. 
Tkis region, the center of which may be said to be the valley of 
the Zambesi, is proving to be the key to the large and fertile area 
which covers the greatest mineral discoveries of these times. 
English missionaries have for many years occupied the country, 
and some two or three years ago a British Resident Minister hoist- 
ed the British Hag, and has ever since administered the civil govern- 
ment, until Major Pinto made his appearance the other day at the 
head of an armed force and claimed the country on behalf of 
Portugal. He hauled down the British flag, and forced the na- 
tives to make treaties with him, and committed all the other acts 
that are the primary cause of the present trouble. 

But England's chief interest in the disputed territory has yet to 
be stated. It is the only road left open to her by which she can 
hope to tap the gold fields of South Africa by means of a railroad 
from the coast. Therein consists the essential importance of the 
territory. It lies between the Transvaal and Delagoa Bay. The 
British have done everything in their power to get the iron horse 
into the country by all other possible routes, but have been 
estopped by the objections of the Boers to railroads crossing their 
country. A railroad was pushed up from Cape Town, but had to 
end at Kimberley, a distance of 720 miles. Another was built 
from Port Elizabeth, but could go no further than the Orange 
Free State. A third was built from Port Natal, but had to end at 
the boundary of the Dutch Boer Republic. The only remaining, 
but best route of all, is that from Delagoa Bay, through Nyassa- 
land and the Shire district, and is that which England holds on to 
with such tenacity, and the importance of which Major Pinto has 
had the sagacity to see only when it was too late. The annexed 
skeleton map gives a fair idea of the relative positions of the 
places named. 



SOUTH AFRICA 








As a matter of fact, the whole future progress and development 
of Southern Africa seem to depend upon the disputed country be- 
ing immediately availed of for railroad purposes. That England 
will hold it and build the road, goes without saying. In this 
connection, it may seem strange to many that England consented 
to have her railroad projects ended by the cussednesa of the Boers 
in the two Republics that lie athwart the line of progress. But 
Mr. Gladstone had created a sentiment in favor of letting the 
stubborn Boers have their way, and that sentiment the present 



Government did not care to disturb. Besides, it is only a question 
of time as to British influence again dominating the Transvaal. 
Tue English are now pouring in in such numbers that their su- 
premacy is bound to follow. 

The exchanges to hand from Australia are full of discussions on 
the proposed federation scheme. Public meetings were being held 
in all the Colonies favoring the movement. It looks pretty certain 
that a Dominion will be created, with a single Parliament and Pro- 
vincial Legislatures, very much on the model supplied by Canada. 
There is no reason why Australia should not for many long years 
go on and prosper under such a system. Whether her destiny is 
to form a distinguished member in an Imperial family of federated 
states, with England as the chief, or in good time declare her in- 
dependence and set up for herself as a Republic, time alone can 
determine. But whatever course Australia determines upon, she 
will in the end do well. She commenced well, has avoided the 
extremes observable elsewhere, has laid deep foundations for a 
grand superstructure of national prosperity, and has noble aspira- 
tions that may be expected to lead to great things. 

The Oceanic brings the news from Japan that a responsible min- 
istry has been formed, and a system of constitutional government 
entered upon that must seem strange to the Japanese, unaccus- 
tomed as they are, to such ways. But they are wonderfully quick 
to adapt themselves to whatever turns up and may be expected 
in a few years to be as great adepts in Parliamentary ways as if 
they had been to the manor born. The difference between them 
and their brethren of the Mongolian race in China, in the matter 
of abandoning traditional ways, has been one of the surprises of 
the century, 

Poor Amadeo, Ex-King of Spain, is dead. He went to Madrid 
much against his will, but once there, he did his best to render 
himself popular, please the Spaniards, and rule wisely and welt. 
He showed himself in all sorts of places, though the risk at the 
time was great, and really extorted the respect of the people w r ho 
did not desire him for King. When he became satisfied that he 
could not succeed, he voluntarily abdicated. If any foreigner 
could have won over the Spaniards, he would have done so. 



FRYE'S SUBSIDY SCHEME. 

THE bill introduced by Frye, of Maine, into the Senate, repre- 
sents the steamship interests of the East. The fact that it 
has been fathered by Congressman Morrow and introduced in the 
House, is evidence that it is no less satisfactory to the steamship 
men of the Pacific Coast. It has all the support the Administra- 
tion can give it, and is likely to become a law. The shrewd men 
who have it in charge have no doubt counted heads and ascer- 
tained in advance what is the most they can hope to accomplish. 
Frye's bill must be accepted as the result. It is a sugar-coated 
measure; a thick covering of molasses being necessary to render 
it acceptable to a Congress dominated by an anti-subsidy majority. 
It is framed in such a way as to make it appear that its great 
purposes are the creation of an auxiliary navy and the training 
of officers and men to serve in the regular navy. All that it will 
ever accomplish in thatwayis justsomuch buncombe with which 
to tickle the groundlings. Its real and substantial purpose is 
found in the section which gives a bounty, bonus, subsidy, or 
whatever else political exigencies may demand that it be called, 
to American-built steamers employed in winning foreign 
commerce. The bill will give something over $30,000 
per round trip to each of our steamers engaged in the 
Australian and China trade, and to that extent will give 
San Francisco an advantage in the severe competition for the 
commerce of those countries. That is undoubtedly an advantage 
that will be badly needed early next year, when the new steam- 
ers now being built for the Canadian Pacific are on their destined 
routes. As a consistent and persistent advocate of government 
aid to any and all American steamship lines that can thereby 
compete with foreigners and successfully open up new channels 
of commerce, the News Letter approves of Senator Frye's bill, 
but only because it is the best that can be obtained from the pres- 
ent Congress. Had the circumstances been more propitious, we 
should have liked to have seen a broader policy placed on a more 
lasting basis. A hard-and-fast rule, that gives the same bonus to 
all steamers, upon all routes, and without regard to the business 
to be done, the capacity to do it, and the probabilities of its be- 
coming self-sustaining, cannot be defended, and therefore cannot 
long endure. But to the argument that it is the best that can be 
done at present, there is no answer. It suffices for us, and it will 
suffice for every citizen with whom the progress and prosperity 
of San Francisco are paramount. Our city has too much to hope 
for from winning foreign commerce to captiously object to any 
measure, however defective, that may tend to promote that end. 

PoisON-OAKcired by Steele's GriudeliaLotion. Twenty years 'experience 
has proved this remedy to be &specific. Apply immediately after returning 
from apicuie excursion, aud the dread eruption will be prevented. James 
G. Steele & Co. .635 Market street. 

Reliability over 30 years' standing. Mutter's Optical Depot, 135 Mont- 
gomery, near Bush street. 



ESTABLISHED 1 8U« ] 



Number 32. 



(California .Xdbcrtiscr. 

OCVOTCD TO Tnf LtAOiNQ IsT* RES'S OF CALIFORNIA AND THE PACIFIO COAST. 

-ielor, Frxdkbick Marriott; 
Fk>- 1 J - :»i FrancifCO. Annual Sub' 

-Imdimff Potto :' Canada, $$; Foreign^ $fi. 

Rrairtrrtdaitke Ptutoflceat > :•> > '■/■irnio.a* eccond~cla4t matter. 



SAB FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. FIBBVARY /, 1890. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Lkadikg Article-- : Page 

AnneXaltouol L-'M-tT California 1 

The Hm-> B*ea Ol 1'nllliCB 1 
1 

Exacting the Pound o. Flesh. 2 

The l-aw of the Blvlhc Ca>e 3 

The Naval Grab. . 8 

The tulice Coort Revival. 2 

The Fuueral Habit 3 

Th* Possible Calamity 3 

Tbe Chinese Minister's Corre- 
spondence 8 

Spreckels at \Va*hiugton 3 

Art ud Humbug 3* 

4 

Way 3 of Giving io Charity o 

Plea>ure's Waud f> 

Gotham Gossip 7 

An Cglv Kum<»r. 7 

Sparks 8 

The Railroads 9 



Sporting. 
■■ YV>, air,' 



Mag"» Letter 
Vanities. 



and " No, Ma'am ' 



Page 

Ffnauciat Review 14 

Town Crier 15 

The Library Table 16 

The Rose Jar 17 

Real Proper! v 18 

A Doctor and His Bill 18 

Bourse and Underwriter. 19 

Scientific and Useful 20 

World, Flesh and Devil 21 

"Biz" 22 

Sunbeams 24 

Our Burlesque Postal System. 25 

The Future of the Almshouse ... 25 
street Views of San Francisco.... 25 
Whom the Gods Would Destroy.. 25 
Admiral Kimberly's Reception,. 26 

Obituary 27 

Love aud La Grippe. 27 

Eccentric Mr. Gounod 27 

Commeuts on Foreign Affairs. . . 28 
Suggestive Failure of a News- 
paper. 25 

The Effect of tbe Rain 26 

To Daphne. 26 



ANNEXATION OF LOWER CALIFORNIA. 



OVER a year ago the News Letter called attention to the bad ef- 
fects likely to flow from the inconsiderate movement to an- 
nex Lower California, and expressed the hope that the matter 
would be allowed to drop. Unfortunately that advice is not being 
heeded. Congressman Vandever manages to keep the project be- 
fore the public in a way that is proving very exasperating to the 
Government and people of Mexico, who are very naturally sensi- 
tive on the subject of the absorption of their territory by this 
country. They long felt exceedingly bitter in regard to the loss 
of Te^as, California, Arizona and New Mexico, and although the 
soreness has during late years considerably abated, it is still a 
tender subject, in regard to which we are profoundly distrusted. 
In view of the important commercial relations that are growing 
up between the two countries, it is tbe worst conceivable policy 
to rip open the old sore anew. Senor Mariscal, the Mexican 
Minister of Foreign Affairs, has been compelled by the pressure 
of public opinion in his own country, to send to Washington a 
very earnest, but at the same time dignified protest against the 
continuance of this annexation agitation. It is proving exceed- 
ingly embarrassing to tbe existing administration, which has in 
many ways shown great good-feeling towards the United States, 
and certainly merits a better return than to be brought into 
odium at home through action taken on this side of the border. 
Senor Mariscal intimates that if the agitation is continued, the 
policy by which President Diaz has persistently endeavored to 
draw the two countries closer together in the bonds of mutual in- 
terest and good-will, must be abandoned, and that at a time when 
a large measure of success has been attained. The recent publi- 
cation of that communication, which is addressed to Minister 
Romero, ought to call out such a prompt and decided response 
from our better class of public men as will at once set at rest the 
not unnatural alarms of the Mexican people. No responsible 
authority and no considerable number of our citizens have the 
slightest desire to disturb the boundary lines which at present di- 
vide our territory from theirs, and it is due to our neighbors, as 
well as to a friendly government, that that fact should be made 
known in a way that will leave no further room for doubt or un- 
easy feelings of any kind. Congressman Vandever represents 
nobody but himself and a handful of interested land speculators 
at San Diego. His crazy notion is to so extend our southern 
boundary as to render it easy to divide the State of California, 
and thereafter secure his own election to the United States Senate. 
But it is very certain that four-fifths of the people of California 
are strongly opposed to any such scheme, and would speedily 
make themselves both heard and felt if there was the slightest 
possibility of Vandever getting his way. He talks about a friendly 
purchase of Lower California, but he ought to know that tbe exist- 
ing Constitution of Mexico provides that any Minister proposing 
to part with any portion of tbe national domain is guilty of 
treason. The United States has no special use for Lower Cali- 
fornia, does not covet it, and could not without war obtain it, if 
it were wanted never so badly. The agitation on the subject is 
mischievous from every point of view, and ought to be sat down 
upon heavily by all right-thinking people, and especially by both 
Congress and the Administration. 



THE BUSY BEES OF POLITICS. 

THIS year of grace la to bo a busy year in local politics. The 
wire-pulliTs and slate-makers arc already at* industriously eti 
gaged U BO many busy bees. How thing9 are being 0X6(3 in 
advance tho public ia not very likely to be informed precisely; 
that is the politician's business— ?not the public's. When tbe 
fixing is done to the wire-puller's satisfaction, then we may all 
take a hand in what follows; that is to say, we may do the vot- 
ing. We shall have had no part or lot in naming the candidates, 
but we will all go to tin- polls and vote for them with as much 
enthusiasm as if we had, and thereafter be ready to conscien- 
tiously swear that ours is a government by, through and for the 
people, .lust now the great majority of us know little and care 
less about what is going on around us in regard to these matters. 
The demands of business ami the cares of life are too great to 
permit the average citizen to watch politics for nine months at a 
stretch, but unless he does, all the real power he exercises in tbe 
way of influencing the course of public affairs is confined to the 
simple act of ratifying the selfish and abominable decrees of the 
bosses. Men will be put up for us to vote for who will, if the 
opportunity occurs, sell out the city and bleed the State, and we 
shall be perfectly powerless to help ourselves. The bosses will 
have taken care that we have no choice except between two sets 
of candidates equally bad. The securing of that class of candi- 
dates is the business that is going on right now. It is that which 
is making the politicians so busy at this time. They are tireless 
and sleepless in the pursuit of that purpose. They find bread 
and butter and profit in their occupation. Meanwhile the people 
who pay the taxes are too busy earning them to bother about 
how the steals of the future are being put up. Presently Mr. 
Buckley will be inviting his fellow-citizens of the Democratic 
persuasion to step up to the ward clubs and elect delegates to the 
nominating conventions; but he knows full well that only citi- 
zens of a certain class will accept his invitation. The Tigers of 
Telegraph Hill, the Rock-rollers of Tar Flat and the rowdies from 
everywhere will carry the primaries of both political parties, and 
see that nobody else does. The roughs and toughs, always too 
numerous in large cities, will elect the delegates who are to nom- 
inate our candidates, and those delegates will be owned by the 
boss, and they will put up his slate for us all to vote for, and 
things will be so arranged that, no matter who loses, the boss 
will win. We say all this will happen, and it will. It is true that 
if ever there was a time when people ought to rise in open rebel- 
lion against a monstrous state of atfairs, that time is now. There 
should be no more renewals of such Legislatures as the last. But 
what are the people going to do about it ? 

SELECTING JURORS. 



IT is understood that the twelve Superior Judges are about to 
prepare the jury lists for the year. It is an important duty in 
regard to which too much care cannot be exercised. It is really 
astonishing how some very questionable men get on to both petit 
and grand juries. Of course, under our present system they 
could not get there unless assisted by a Superior Judge. Why 
that assistance is ever given to a notoriously unfit person, it 
would be difficult to explain sometimes. We live in an era of 
" pulls," and bad influence makes itself felt in many unsuspected 
quarters. It gets closer, occasionally to an elected judiciary than 
most people like to believe. Nominations must be had or elec- 
tions do not follow. Judges are but men and as such are very 
apt to do the things necessary to the winning the favors of the 
nominating power. In point of fact, the naming of a certain 
number of jurors by the bosses has come to be deemed one of the 
privileges of their position. It is a dangerous privilege to be in 
such hands. It is monstrous that it should be possible for jurors 
to emanate from any such source. We may be very sure that 
when a boss selects his men for jury duty, he does not name 
them because of their love of justice, but because he knows he 
can use them to pervert justice in his i interests. That is a self- 
evident proposition which no man more clearly realizes than the 
judge who feels constrained to put names into the box which, in 
his heart, he knows have no business there. But the trouble 
stares him in the face that he must do as he is told, or be refused 
a renomination. We know 'there are judges who would decline 
such dictation no matter what the cost, but we know others who 
have yielded to it most complacently. Each judge names ten 
grand jurors and he ought to be required to state publicly who 
they are. The daily press should find out and credit each judge 
with the names of his appointees. The public would then know 
whom to blame for the very ominous names that so frequently 
turn up on grand juries. There should be no secret about the 
why and the how of citizens being selected to do jury duty. If 
a judge feels called upon to put the names of boss-ruled creatures 
into the box, the public should know the fact, and the only avail- 
able way by which it can learn it, is by being informed who the 
nominees of each judge are. The wrong-doing judge in that case 
would be likely to lose public favor, but if he deliberately prefers 
the approval of the boss, he has only himself to blame. No paid 
judicial officer should shrink from the avowal of the manner in 
which he exercises a grave public trust. When secret ways are 
producing crooked results, the obvious remedy is to turn on the 
light. If ominous names are found on the grand jury panel, by 
all means, let us know who put them there. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



Feb. 1, 1890. 



EXACTING THE POUND OF FLESH. 

IN the every-day conduct of private business, in the making and 
performing of contracts, both express and implied, the man of 
affairs is generally inclined to be just, reasonable and fair, and is 
ready and willing to be governed by the rules of equity. The 
time has long passed since the " pound of flesh " rule has been 
enforced, regardless of circumstances and conditions. In its place 
has grown up a more humane, liberal and just system, the result 
of the adoption, by the courts of the country, of the principles 
for the recognition of which the courts of equity so long con- 
tended. In the matter of the performance of contracts where 
one party agrees to render service or do certain things within a 
time agreed or at a time certain, a failure to carry out such an 
agreement will be excused, except, perhaps, in cases where time 
is the essential element, if it appear that the performance has 
been delayed or prevented by causes beyond the control of either 
party, or unforeseen at the time the contract was made. In such 
cases the contract may be performed at a later date, and the party 
so performing it will lose none of his rights. It is a rare thing for 
an individual to resist payment for services rendered, upon the 
ground that they had not been performed within the contract 
period, where unusual occurrences, such as heavy storms, etc., 
had prevented the completion of the work at or within the time 
stipulated. If an attempt were made to evade payment upon 
such a ground, the courts would promptly set the seal of their 
disapproval upon such conduct, and would require payment to be 
made. 

If, however, we place the man who, in his private affairs, is 
just, equitable, honest and liberal, in charge of any department 
of the Governmental service, he at once develops a marked and very 
peculiar change of character. He deems it his duty to " protect " 
the Government against every possible evil. He becomes arbi- 
trary, mean, unjust and exacting. On behalf of the Government 
he demands everything, and gives as little as he can. To post- 
pone the payment of just demands, and thereby deprive the 
creditor of the use of his money for a time, to evade the payment 
of the bills of the country where any possible technicality can be 
availed of for that purpose, to force creditors to the courts to ob- 
tain their just dues, to compel the performance of all contracts to 
the letter, regardless of anything and everything — anything to 
show his vigilance in the public service — is his work by day and 
his dream by night. On behalf of the Government he will be 
guilty of a thousand petty, mean, disgraceful tricks, which he 
would be ashamed to practice in his own business matters. To 
such an extent is this practice carried by officials in order to make 
a " record " and to " stand well " with their constituents, that it 
has become the rule rather than the exception, and the competi- 
tion between the political parties in their anxiety to prove their 
worthiness makes matters worse. Many of the acts done in the 
name of the Government are so outrageous that if it were a hu- 
man being, and were indicted for its crimes, it would be convicted 
and would spend all of its days in the penitentiary. 

The latest aspirant for public approval as a » watchdog of the 
treasury " is the Philadelphia storekeeper who was made Post- 
master-General. The mails are carried by contractors, chief among 
whom are the railroad companies. Under these contracts the 
railroads must make schedule time, and for failure to do so the 
Postmaster-General is vested with discretionary power to » make 
deductions " from their pay. This discretion has been most arbi- 
trarily exercised by Wanamaker. In fact, no discretion whatever 
has been exercised. Wherever delay has occurred, no matter from 
what cause, he has made his deductions or imposed his fines. 
Floods, washouts, snow blockades, burned bridges have been no 
excuses for him, and although the service was really performed as 
quickly as human power could do it, the companies have had to 
surfer the loss of the money justly due for services rendered. An 
instance in point is the recent burning of the railroad bridge at 
Cascade, which delayed trains for some, hours. The loss by the 
burning of the bridge was $60,000. On account of the delay thus 
occasioned Wanamaker fined the company $223, although it per- 
formed the full service contracted for. Because of the delay of 
the mails by reason of the present blockade, the railroad com- 
pany is suffering a fine of $226.84 for each train, although it has 
the mails on its cars, and will deliver the same to points of desti- 
nation as soon as the expenditure of money and the exercise of 
brain and muscle can do it. When appealed to to remit fines im- 
posed because of this unavoidable delay, Wanamaker replied that 
11 while he appreciates and commends the strenuous efforts made 
by the company to maintain the mail service, yet no remission 
can be granted." 

This stand taken by Wanamaker contrasts most unfavorably 
with that taken by his Democratic predecessor, Don M. Dickin- 
son, whose answer in a similar case was as follows: " If a railroad 
contractor, using the highest degree of diligence, and at all times 
giving precedence and expedition to the business of carrying the 
mails, as contemplated by law, shall fail without fault, and 
through unavoidable action, or the act of God, to make his sched- 
ule time and his connections, and yet shall give the mileage and 
service contracted for, his pay should not be reduced, and most 
assuredly he should not be fined." 



THE LAW OF THE BLYTHE CASE. 

AVERY erroneous, impression seems to prevail as to the de- 
cision of the Supreme Court. on the point as to what consti- 
tutes the necessary consummation of legal marriage. A mere 
secret agreement between the parties is not in itself sufficient ac- 
cording to the latest and best judgment of the Appellate Court. 
But if the secret agreement be followed by the open and avowed 
assumption of the duties and obligations of married life, the mar- 
riage is complete and binding at law. It is a mistake to suppose 
that a decision has been delivered rendering any formality or cere- 
mony an indispensable necessity. But what the parties must do 
is to live openly together, as married people usually do, mutually 
maintaining towards each other and the world the attitude of 
married life, to the end that people generally may comprehend 
their relationship. A secret marriage contract only becomes bind- 
ing and legal when the parties openly assume its obligations in 
the face of society. Public policy demands that there shall be a 
reasonable way by which society may for itself determine who 
are married people and who are not. The law, as at present in- 
terpreted, holds that when a man and woman live together, 
openly and in the light of day, treating each other as husband 
and wife, the relationship will not be deemed meretricious unless 
the contrary appears. That is the point settled in the latest de- 
cision in the Sharon case. The parties may agree to take each 
other as husband and wife verbally, or in writing, or in any 
other way, and provided such agreement is followed by their pub- 
lic assumption towards each other (so that society may have cog- 
nizance of the fact) of marital obligations, the marriage is com- 
plete for all the purposes of the law. That explains why lawyer 
Highton is with such industry and success piling up the proofs 
of how Alice Edith Blythe performed all the duties incidental to 
married life. 



THE NAVAL GRAB. 



IN our financial history heretofore the appearance of a surplus 
has generally been followed by something closely resembling 
national bankruptcy. Apparently we are to have the experience 
again. If the surplus were $500,000,000 a year instead of about 
forty millions, the schemes that are now hopefully urged at 
Washington would wipe it out. There are half a dozen projects 
on foot with good prospects of success, any one of which would 
turn the national balance into a deficit. Secretary Tracy and the 
Naval Committee of the Senate are doing their part manfully in 
the great work of smashing the Treasury. They are trying to 
commit the Government to a scheme for the expenditure of nearly 
$350,000,000 on a fleet of cruising battle ships of the kind that 
England uses when she wants to make a » naval demonstration " 
as a bluff in a game of diplomacy. There are occasions on which 
a cat might conceivably find use for two tails; a fifth wheel is 
sometimes a valuable appendage to a coach ; there might possibly 
be states of the weather in which there would be some comfort in 
having a stove in Hades, but there is no imaginable contingency 
in which we should find such a navy as that proposed worth its 
cost. For the last ten years we have been warned about the 
danger of our unprotected sea ports, until we have jumped every 
time a brick has fallen on our heads from the top of a new build- 
ing, imagining it to be a German shell. And now it is proposed 
to abandon the construction of coast defense vessels and let our 
sea ports take their chances for fourteen years while we sink our 
money in an ornamental fleet, whose only value will be to furnish 
flag-ships for new Admirals. Of course there are degrees of folly. 
Even that would be better than turning the whole Treasury over 
to the pension grabbers. 

THE POLICE COURT REVIVAL. 

THE Police Court reporters of the dailies have evidently been 
asleep for some weeks. They have allowed the most sensa- 
tional item of the season to escape them. There has been a revi- 
val of religion among the shysters, and not a word has been 
heard about it on the outside. It must be so, and the revival 
must have been a thoroughgoing one at that, for it penetrated the 
indurated shell of Attorney Ben. Napthaly. Mr. Napthaly arose 
in Judge Joachimsen's Court on Tuesday, inspired by the justice 
of his cause and ten dollars' worth of professional enthusiasm, 
to defend a gentleman accused of assault and battery. Before 
the cauldron of his eloquence had fairly begun to sizzle, he was 
reminded in a somewhat heated manner by the gentleman who 
had incurred the assault, that he had accepted ten dollars to ap- 
pear for the prosecution, Mr. Napthaly came down. He banked 
his oratorical fires, and announced sadly that there seemed to be 
nothing to do but to give up both fees and retire from the case. 
Pause a moment, and let the full magnitude of the sacrifice filter 
through your understanding. Twenty dollars given up at a clip 
by a Police Court lawyer. If there is anything in the new code 
of Police Court ethics, inconsistent with raking in all the fees in 
sight, and the more the merrier, the religious revival that caused 
the resolution must have been a stunner. But, on second thought, 
one possibility has been overlooked. Napthaly merely said he 
was going to return the fees. 






SAN FRANCISCO NEW8 LETTER. 



THE FUNERAL HABIT. 

OF Ihr several fashion* of which we are the victims, there is 
n-mp non toUlroelj NUoMp than that of the preseni mode 

of attending funeral*. There is no nation, in this regard, which 
makes Keell to thorooghlj ridiculous as that of the American. 

Respect to the dend is beautiful end fitting, hut when that respect 
is carried at the danger of one's life, the trihute t<> the memory of 
the deceased should take some other form, more sensible and 
equally a* decorou- It El DOl the duly of the Nnvs Letter to 
formulate a ceremony, but it will cheerfully undertake to point 
out the evils of the present system, and supply force to its re- 
marks by gi vine some example? which are familiar to most people 
of this city. William T. (iarratt's funeral took place not long 
since, and being a man of great consequence, his funeral was 
naturally attended by prominent people. The result of that at- 
tendance has been fatal to two men who followed the body of 
their friend to its last resting place— William Vale and M. J. 
Keating. Both laid the foundations for a severe cold, which ter- 
minated only with their deaths. M, J. Keating was a public 
servant, much admired and respected, and to his funeral went 
several leading men. Among them were M. H. de Young, 
Mayor Tond and Surveyor of the Port, Tinnin. Each of these 
three men there caught a cold which developed dangerous symp- 
toms, and each have been within the shadow of the gloomy trees 
which line the banks of the Dark River. Looked at from the 
most charitable of views, our present mode of managing a funeral 
is abominably idiotic. In the first place : gentlemen, the friends of 
the deceased, are given the doubtful honor of acting as pall- 
bearers. The present style of coffin or casket is not light. The 
inner shell is generally of heavy metal, which is fitted into a 
ponderous wooden casket, replete with silverhandles and gorgeous 
trimmings. When the body is in the casket the weight can be 
imagined ! Gentlemen unaccustomed to hard work, carry this 
caaket down the long aisle of a church, out in the open air, heated 
with the unwonted exercise and bareheaded. Is it any wonder 
that they catch a cold? Then a long drive at snail's pace to a 
cemetery, where hats are again doffed, and the body is borne to 
the grave. The assemblage gathers around, and despite the fact 
that a chill wind, freighted with death, is blowing upon them, 
there they stand in this bleak and exposed spot listening to the 
prosy rhetoric of a preacher, who alone is interested in his dis- 
course. What is the inevitable consequence ? A serious sickness. 
There is no exaggeration in this. We have had during the past 
two weeks two deaths from attending a funeral in the manner 
just described, and three prominent men have been so ill 
that their lives have been despaired of. It is to be hoped that 
with these examples staring us in the face, we shall in future be 
guided more by common sense than make ourselves the victims 
of a fashion which has no recommendation other than custom. 

THE POSSIBLE CALAMITY. 



MRS. WOODWORTH, the circus-tent revivalist of Oakland, 
has distanced Old Probabilities as a long-range weather proph- 
et. She predicts that within eighty days San Francisco, Oak- 
land and Alameda will be engulfed by an earthquake and tidal 
wave, and that all the inhabitants of these towns will perish un- 
less they escape to the hills. The spirit of prophecy may have 
missed fire in this instance, but it is interesting to reflect that a 
catastrophe that would dwarf Mrs. Woodworth's is well within 
the limits of possibility. The whole interior of this State was 
once a great lake. It was drained off by the breaking of the dam 
at the*Golden Gate. All that is needed to turn it into a lake agajin 
is to reconstruct the dam. That could be accomplished by an 
earthquake infinitely milder than those we have seen within the 
past few years in Java, New Zealand and Alaska. It could be 
done by the seismic energy displayed in 1811 in the Mississippi 
Valley, and probably by that of 1872 in Inyo County. Suppose 
there should be an upheaval of two or three hundred feet in the 
bottom of the Golden Gate — what would happen? The floods 
that have been coming done the Sacramento and the San Joaquin 
of late would back over the plains. In three months, with such 
weather as we have had since October, the water would average 
six feet deep throughout the central valley. The tallest farmers 
would be standing on their toes and just holding their noses above 
the surface. All the rest would be with McGinty. In another 
month the Sacramento granger would be extinct. In a year the 
water in the streets of the capital would be as high as boarding- 
house charges during a session of the Legislature. In ten years 
the foothill towns would be lake ports, and Major Blakeney would 
be complaining that the surf at Oroville was too rough to launch 
a lifeboat. In the course of time a cataract would be flowing 
over the top of the dam, and then the obstruction would be grad- 
ually worn away, the water would recede, and the valley would 
be ready for a new deal. Perhaps Mrs. Woodworth has received 
private information that something of this kind is going to hap- 
pen. She says that the Lord told her that within eighty days 
there would not be ten righteous people left in San Francisco, 
Oakland and Alameda — at least, on the low ground. We have 
noticed that pious citizens like Mr. Sutro have been investing 
heavily in elevated real estate. They will make a good thing out 
of the catastrophe when it comes. 



THE CHINESE MINISTER'S CORRESPONDENCE. 

AT last we know officially what the Chinese Government has 
had to say about the Exclusion Act. There was some very 
natural curiosity upon the subject because of the publicdecl ara- 
tion of Li Hung Chang that "China would not submit to this vio- 
lation of her treaty rights." Just what he expected to do did not 
appear. President Harrison has now sent to the Senate the cor- 
respondence between the State Department and the Chinese Min- 
ister at Washington, from which it transpires that the latter wrote 
to Secretary Blaine in July last, expressing surprise that the 
United States Supreme Court had sustained the legality of the act. 
" He had not been prepared to learn," he said, " that this country 
was governed in a way whereby the Government could release 
itself from a treaty obligation without consultation with or the 
consent of the other party," and he goes on to express the hope 
that " a way may be found by which the action of Congress can 
be undone." It is a very mild protest compared with what we 
had been told to expect. There is nothing said about refusing to 
submit, and nothing like a threat of any kind is so much as 
hinted. It may be gathered, however, that the Chinese Minister 
entertains the expectation that the act which shortly expires will 
not be renewed by Congress. He has probably been so told by 
not a few public men in Washington, and it is very conceivable 
that there will be a great deal of trouble in getting the sanction 
of Congress to the measure over again. Total exclusion never 
has been deliberately approved by the law-making power. The 
Scott Bill was a fluke, put through because of the exigencies of a 
pending Presidential election. The present act expires, we be- 
lieve, at the end of the present year, and it is not any too soon 
for our representatives to be preparing the way for its re-enact- 
ment. 



SPRECKELS AT "WASHINGTON. 

THAT was a bad break which a daily contemporary made the 
other day when it published a column of literary trash directed 
tor the purpose of defeating the efforts of Mr. Claus Spreckels at 
Washington to promote his own interests and those of this coast 
at the same time. The Ways and Means Committee had the sugar 
duties under consideration, and it was highly proper that so re- 
presentative a man and so unquestionable an authority as Mr. 
Spreckels should be present, and lend all the weight of his influ- 
ence to the prevention of a course of action that would forever de- 
stroy one of the most promising industries of the country. The 
cultivation of beets means a great deal for California, the climate 
and soil of which are peculiarly suited to the purpose. Germany 
and France have demonstrated what great things can be accom- 
plished in the matter of beet sugar producing. They have not 
only overtaken their own wants but are large exporters, and 
thereby a big thing has been accomplished for the cultivators 
of the soil, a class to which any country may well extend a friend- 
lyand helping hand. It was bounties upon the home product 
that gave birth to the industry, and made it a success. Just when 
beet sugar growing was about to be domiciled on the soil of our 
country the Ways and Means Committee, with a strange lack of 
knowledge of what was happening, proposed to either greatly re- 
duce or abolish the sugar duties, and so kill the infant beet sugar 
industry. Mr. Spreckels was the right man in the right place 
when he was at Washington showing the Committee the mistake 
of the action it contemplated. He was, of course, also doing good 
service to California when he was persuading the Appropriations 
Committee to do that which alone will save our trade with Aus- 
tralia. All who understand the material interests of this Coast 
will applaud what Mr. Spreckels has been doing. 

ART AND HUMBUG. 



THERE are plenty of deserving stage people, but the most de- 
serving of them frequently occasion fatigue. This weariness 
is especially marked when they rotate their eyes heavenward and 
begin to discourse about their "art." They are all artists, although 
the art of kicking when the bo,x office receipts and the salary list 
fail to harmonize, is the most uniformly developed among them. 
Here is Miss Ada Rehan — an admirable actress, and an equally 
admirable woman — who has just suffered the grief of her father's 
death. She began playing Rosalind again the night after the 
funeral, and "never," say her admiring friends among the New 
York critics, "did she act the part with more grace and spirit. 
Nobody could have imagined that the smiling face concealed a 
heavy heart." Miss Rehan had a right, of course, to do as she 
pleased, but when the critics praise her " devotion to her art," and 
speak of her prompt resumption of business as a martyrdom to 
duty, they offend. There is no form of art that would have 
suffered from Miss Rehan's absence from the stage for a week. 
Thi